Program descriptions

Master of Science in Nursing

Professor B. Srof, Department chair
Professor R. Stoltzfus, Director of the graduate program in nursing
Professor L. Wheeler
Associate Professors S. Setiawan, J. Srof

Introduction

The master of science in nursing program is designed for the registered nurse who is a graduate of a baccalaureate program in nursing. Courses meet once per week during late afternoon and evening hours. The program is built on a tradition of excellence in nursing education at the undergraduate and graduate levels. A distinctive feature of the program is an emphasis on nursing care in a culturally diverse society. We believe in providing care that values understanding the stories of patients, including those who are marginalized in our society.

The graduate nursing program offers one track of study:  Family Nurse Practitioner.  The program prepares students for the certification exam through the American Association of Nurse Practitioners or the American Nurses Credentialing Center.

Admission information

Admission requirements include the following:

  • GPA of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale (or equivalent) for the last degree earned
  • curriculum vitae
  • bachelor’s degree in nursing from a school accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education or by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission
  • an active RN license in the state where clinical work will be completed
  • three professional references that attest to academic and professional achievements
  • an essay
  • an introductory statistics course with a grade of ‘C’ or higher within the last seven years
  • at least one year of clinical experience working as a registered nurse in the United States
  • a personal interview with the director of the graduate program in nursing

If applicant’s first language is not English, a TOEFL score of at least 100 on the Internet-based or 600 on written-based test or IELTS score of 6.5 is required.

The nursing department reserves the right to adjust the current admission criteria when outcome assessment data demonstrate the need for such changes.

A maximum of 9 credit hours of comparable graduate level coursework from an accredited college or university may be transferred, with the consent of the academic adviser. Comparable is defined as courses that fulfill the requirements for the program to which the student will be enrolled. Courses considered for transfer must have a grade of B (not B-) or higher.

Tuition and fees

  • M.S. in Nursing (per credit hour) $650
    (48 credit hour program)
  • Annual Program Fee:$190

Career opportunities

The family nurse practitioner is a provider of direct healthcare services. Within this role, the family nurse practitioner synthesizes theoretical, scientific, and contemporary clinical knowledge for the assessment and management of both health and illness states.

Clinical information

Family nurse practitioner students are required to complete a minimum of 672 clock hours of clinical work with an approved preceptor.

Master of science in nursing

Family Nurse Practitioner – 48 credit hours

Core curriculum (25 credit hours)

  • Nurs 500, Foundations for Leadership 3
  • Nurs 510, Healthcare Ethics 2
  • Nurs 520, Advanced Pathophysiology 3
  • Nurs 522, Pharmacology for Advanced Nursing 3
  • Nurs 524, Advanced Health Assessment 3
  • Nurs 600, Mental Healthcare for APRNs2
  • Nurs 602, Theoretical & Conceptual Foundations 3
  • Nurs 604, Promoting Health in Vulnerable Populations 3
  • Nurs 606, Research I 3

Family nurse practitioner courses (23 credit hours)

  • Nurs 540, Health and Illness in Pediatrics 6
  • Nurs 542, Health and Illness in Women 6
  • Nurs 544, Health and Illness in Adults 6
  • Nurs 608, Transition to Practice 5

Planning and advising notes

Programs follow a cohort model, with students taking core courses together. The FNP program requires eight semesters of study.

MSN Student learning outcomes

Upon completion of the MSN program, graduates will demonstrate:

  1. A faith that is active, reflective, sensitive, and responsive to the spiritual needs of self and others. (MSN Essential #9)
  2. An understanding of ethical and moral issues that expand the advocacy role of the advanced practice nurse or clinical nurse leader. (MSN Essential #1; DNP Essential #2)
  3. Utilization of knowledge from nursing, natural and social science and the arts in the management of patient health/illness status or management of microsystems of care. (MSN Essential #1; DNP Essential #1)
  4. Interpretation and evaluation of research for the initiation of change, improvement of nursing practice, management of health outcomes, and provision of high-quality health care. (MSN Essential #4; DNP Essential #3)
  5. Utilization of the research process for addressing clinical problems. (MSN Essential #4; DNP Essential #3)
  6. Synthesis of knowledge into a personal leadership style that contributes to health for individual, family, and community. (MSN Essential #8; DNP Essential #6)
  7. Promotion of policy development related to the emerging roles within nursing. (MSN Essential #6; DNP Essential #5)
  8. Assimilation of knowledge and principles of teaching/learning in providing health education and health promotion activities. (MSN Essential #7 & #8; DNP Essential #7)
  9. Contribution to health outcomes through advocacy within the profession, interdisciplinary healthcare teamwork, and the care of individuals, families, and communities. (MSN Essentials #3, #6, & #8; DNP Essential #3)
  10. Application of information and communication technologies and resources in evidence-based care and health education. (MSN Essential #5 & #8; DNP Essential #4)
  11. Taking initiative in providing culturally sensitive care. (MSN Essential #8; DNP Essentials #5, 7, & 8)
  12. Exploration of personal and professional values in light of growing health disparities in the community and world. (MSN Essential #2; DNP Essential #2)
  13. Assimilation of conflict transformation and social justice knowledge that is responsive to diverse needs of the individual, family, and community. (MSN Essential #3 & #8)
  14. Application of advanced knowledge in the discipline to specific and vulnerable populations. (MSN Essential #9; DNP Essential #8)

Graduate nursing courses

NURS 500 Foundations for Leadership 3
Examines the theoretical principles and norms for practice for advanced practice nursing and advanced nursing practice. Content includes scope of practice, taking on the role of leader within the identified role, standards & competencies, public policy, legal issues, therapeutic use of self, and cultural competence.

NURS 510 Healthcare Ethics 2
The student is provided with frameworks for ethical decision-making based on theory and opportunities for the development of reflective moral thinking. The student learns to utilize critical thinking as a basis for ethical reasoning. The dynamics of the healthcare professionals' roles are studied in view of pertinent ethical dilemmas. The student is challenged to examine personal and professional values in the context of growing health care disparities impacting the local and world community.

NURS 520 Advanced Pathophysiology 3
Understanding of normal system-focused advanced physiology is applied to pathologic disease process to form a firm foundation for clinical assessment, decision making and clinical management. Includes in-depth study of cell structure and function as a foundation to understanding physiologic as well as pathophysiologic process. An in-depth examination of normal disease process including analysis of common disease, incidence, etiology, manifestation, and prognosis is included. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on the student's ability to analyze and discuss changes in the normal physiologic function that occurs with the disease process.

NURS 522 Pharmacology for Advanced Nursing 3
Advanced pharmacology for nurses is the focus of this course. Therapeutic agents are compared and contrasted for therapeutic affects, adverse affects, indications for use, and drug interactions. This course provides students with a pharmacological basis for advanced practice as a nurse practitioner working with clients across the life span. This course meets Indiana State Board of Nursing's requirements for application for prescriptive authority.

NURS 524 Advanced Health Assessment 3
Builds on basic assessment skills. Attention is placed on the development of advanced assessment skills, collection of the data and documentation of the findings. The in-depth assessment is performed within the context of the family.

NURS 540 Health & Illness in Pediatrics 6
The focus of this course is on the primary care of infants, children and adolescents for the advanced practice nurse. For each developmental stage, the course examines health promotion, disease prevention, psychosocial issues, sexuality and treatment of select common diseases and problems. The student applies, synthesizes and evaluates content from nursing theory and sciences in the clinical practice setting. Requires clinical experience of 168 hours with an approved preceptor. Students may work with patients from across the lifespan, but the focus of the clinical is pediatric health. Prerequisites: Nurs 500, 520, 522, 524.

NURS 542 Health & Illness in Women 6
The focus of this course is primary care of women throughout the lifespan (adolescence through aging adult). For each developmental stage, the course examines health promotion and disease prevention, psychosocial issues, sexuality, and treatment of select diseases. The student applies, synthesizes and evaluates content from nursing theory and sciences in the clinical practice setting. Requires clinical experience of 168 hours with an approved preceptor. Students may work with patients from across the lifespan, but the focus of the clinical is women's health. Prerequisites: Nurs 500, 520, 522, 524.

NURS 544 Health & Illness in Adults 6
The focus of this course is primary care for adults from early adulthood to the aging adult. Students build on their skills in interviewing and assessment while developing decision making skills in the diagnosis of common adult health conditions, including discussion about the management of adults with chronic health conditions. The student applies, synthesizes and evaluates content from nursing theory and sciences in the clinical practice setting. Requires clinical experience of 168 hours with an approved preceptor. Students may work with patients from across the lifespan, but the focus of the clinical is adult health. Prerequisites: Nurs 500, 520, 522, 524.

NURS 600 Mental Healthcare for APRNs 2
Using evidence-based practice guidelines, students integrate screening, diagnosis, and treatment of mental health conditions for patients across the lifespan. Management approaches are examined including pharmacologic treatment, collaboration, and referral. There are no clinical hours connected with this course.

NURS 602 Theoretical & Conceptual Foundation 3
Theories from nursing, family studies, and related disciplines are examined, critiqued, evaluated, and applied to practice. Attention will be given to the transformational potential of theoretical frameworks within the context of a comprehensive, holistic approach to health care.

NURS 604 Promote Health/Vulnerable People 3
The focus of this course is public health promotion and disease prevention among vulnerable populations in the community. Core content includes: community assessment, health program planning, and evaluation for a select aggregate at risk with a focus on population-based interventions and health outcomes. Knowledge of basic epidemiology, communicable disease surveillance, survey data, and cultural assessment contribute to a thorough knowledge of the community and population at risk. Attention will be given to themes of cultural diversity, health disparities, and social determinants of health.

NURS 606 Research I 3
Prepares practitioners for utilization of knowledge to provide high quality health care, initiate change, and improve nursing practice. The focus is the understanding of scientific inquiry, knowledge generation, utilization and dissemination in nursing and healthcare. Scholarly literature review, ethical considerations and research critique are emphasized.

NURS 608 Transition to Practice 5
Focus is on transition to practice. Issues include the professional role, legal issues, practice regulation, preparation for certification exam, negotiating practice agreements, financing healthcare, and fiscal stewardship and management. The student applies, synthesizes and evaluates content from nursing theory and sciences in the clinical practice setting. Requires clinical experience of 168 hours with an approved preceptor. Content will include an overall review of the program as well as focused didactic based on student self-assessment of need and content indicated by the outcomes of the predictor exit exam. Prerequisites: Nurs 500, 520, 522, 524, 540, 542, 544.

NURS 698 Final Project Research & Writing 1
Registration for this course gives students access to library and computer resources while finishing research and writing for the final project. Should be taken only after all other requirements have been satisfied. Can be repeated.

Doctor of Nursing Practice

Professor B. Srof, Department chair
Professor R. Stoltzfus, Director of the graduate program in Nursing, Co-Director of DNP Program
Professor L. Wheeler
Associate Professors J. Shown

Introduction

The doctor of nursing practice program is designed for the master’s prepared registered nurse who is a graduate of a master of science nursing program. This is an asynchronous, online program offered in partnership with Eastern Mennonite University (EMU). The program is built on a tradition of excellence in nursing education at the undergraduate and graduate levels at GC and EMU.  A distinctive feature of the program is an emphasis on stewardship of limited healthcare resources. Graduates of this program are well-prepared to be change agents in their place of employment.

Admission information

Admission requirements include the following:

  • Earned a Master of Science in Nursing from a CCNE- or NLNAC-accredited program with a cumulative GPA of 3.3 of higher
  • Provide documentation of post-baccalaureate supervised practice hours from an accredited MSN program.  If there are fewer than 500 supervised practice hours, the DNP program will be tailored to achieve the required minimum of 1,000 hours of post-baccalaureate supervised practice.
  • Evidence of an unencumbered RN license in the state of practice.  (State of practice must be part of the SARA compact.)
  • Completed reference form from three (3) individuals who are able to address the applicant’s ability to succeed in a DNP program.  Individuals completing the reference form should be among the following:
    • nurse faculty member who has knowledge of the applicant’s academic ability
    • professional work-related colleague or supervisor
    • if practicing as an APRN, at least one should be from an APRN
    • if practicing as a nurse leader/executive, one should be from a supervisor who can address the applicant’s leadership abilities
  • Personal essay of 500 words or less that describes the applicant’s career goals related to pursuing the clinical doctorate.  The essay addresses the applicant’s current thoughts on their preferred focus for the evidenced-based scholarly project.
  • Current resume or curriculum vitae
    • evidence of currency in nursing practice
  • Interview with the co-director via video-conferencing

If applicant’s first language is not English, a TOEFL score of at least 100 on the Internet-based or 600 on written-based test or IELTS score of 6.5 is required.

The nursing department reserves the right to adjust the current admission criteria when outcome assessment data demonstrate the need for such changes.

A maximum of 9 credit hours of comparable graduate level coursework from an accredited college or university may be transferred, with the consent of the academic adviser. Comparable is defined as courses that fulfill the requirements for the program to which the student will be enrolled. Courses considered for transfer must have a grade of B (not B-) or higher.

Tuition and fees

  • Doctor of Nursing Practice (per credit hour) $796
    (33 credit hour program)
  • Residency Fee:$500

Career opportunities

The DNP acts as a leader and a change agent within their work environment.  Within this role, the DNP synthesizes theoretical, scientific, and contemporary clinical knowledge for the improvement of healthcare outcomes.

Clinical information

DNP students are required to complete 1000 faculty-supervised practicum hours.  Students complete 600 practicum hours as part of course work.  Up to 400 hours from post-baccalaureate studies may be accepted and counted toward the requisite 1000 hours.  See program materials for details.

Doctor of Nursing Practice

33 credit hours

  • NURS 700, Foundations for DNP Scholarship 3
  • NURS 702, Health Information Technology3
  • NURS 704, Biostatistics3
  • NURS 706, Population Health & Epidemiology3
  • NURS 708, Translational Science3
  • NURS 710, Healthcare Policy3
  • NURS 712, Organizational & Systems Leadership3
  • NURS 800, DNP Project Development3
  • NURS 802, DNP Project Implementation6
  • NURS 804, DNP Project Analysis & Dissemination3

Planning and advising notes

Program follows a cohort model with accelerated and traditional plan of study options. The accelerated option requires six semesters of study; the traditional option requires nine semesters.

DNP Student learning outcomes

Upon completion of the DNP program, graduates will demonstrate:

  1. Implements and evaluates clinical practice based on the integration of nursing theory and nursing science with knowledge from ethics, the biophysical, psychosocial, analytical, and organizational sciences. (DNP Essential I, VIII)
  2. Demonstrates advanced leadership skills for quality improvement and meeting system level challenges. (DNP Essential II, VIII)
  3. Critically appraises evidence to determine best evidence for practice. (DNP Essential III, VIII)
  4. Employs the use of information technology for the improvement and transformation of healthcare. (DNP Essential IV, VIII)
  5. Demonstrates knowledge of healthcare policy to provide leadership for advocacy and education that shapes the future of healthcare. (DNP Essential V, VIII)
  6. Lead interprofessional teams in the analysis of complex practice and/or organizational issues. (DNP Essential VI)
  7. Analyze epidemiological, biostatistical, environmental, and other appropriate scientific data related to individual, aggregate, and population health. (DNP Essential VII)
  8. Guide, mentor, and support other nurses to achieve excellence in nursing practice. (DNP Essential VIII)
  9. Demonstrate cultural humility in the ethical delivery of care to vulnerable populations.

DNP graduate nursing courses

NURS 690 DNP Practicum 3
DNP Practicum (1 - 9 credits). Students enroll in this course when they transfer in less than 500 practicum hours from their Masters program. Registration for this course must be approved by the DNP Program Director. Tuition for this course is 60% of the current DNP tuition rate.

NURS 700 Foundations for Clinica Scholarship 3
This course assists the student transition from practice into doctoral education from a sacred covenant philosophical framework. Additional topics to be considered are practice approaches based on theoretical, philosophical and historical underpinnings, scholarly writing, and introduction to grant writing. A guided executive summary is the major writing assignment for this course. There is a required residency in this course.

NURS 702 Health Information Technology 3
This course covers key topics in changes in technology, policies and innovations that have occurred, historically and recently. Topics also include health informatics (HI) overview, electronic health records, healthcare data analytics, health information exchange, architecture of information systems, evidence based practice, consumer health informatics, HI ethics, and quality improvement strategies for HI.

NURS 704 Biostatistics 3
Provides an overview of principles, practices and influences of biostatistics. Topics include ability to critique relevance of statistical methods, basic data management skills, and application of research to the clinical setting. Students will use quantitative measures to determine risk and association with health outcome rates. Practicum hours: 20.

NURS 706 Population Health & Epidemiology 3
Provides an overview of principles, practics and influences of epidemiology on health and health care delivery. Content includes identifying and evaluating key public health issues; exploring the roles of local, state, and federal governments in relationship to the core functions of public health; examining health disparities at the local, state, and federal levels; analyzing health systems? approach to health promotion and disease prevention; and exploring practice models that result in interprofessional collaborations for improved health outcomes.

NURS 708 Translational Science 3
The course focuses on critically appraising existing quantitative and qualitative evidence from the literature. The overarching theme is for students to critically appraise existing evidence to develop methods to affect change in practice. Students will develop a literature review matrix in preparation for their DNP project. Practicum Hours: 20

NURS 710 Healthcare Policy 3
This course examines political, ethical, and social factors impacting health policy as they intersect with the elements of cost, quality, and access. Students develop acumen in advocating for health policies consistent with the values of the profession. .

NURS 712 Organizational & Systems Leadership 3
A variety of topics are explored in this course: leadership theory; risk management in organizations; leading Interprofessional teams; relationship management; shared decision-making; working within a diverse workforce; change management; and developing restorative organizations. Practicum hours: 20.

NURS 800 DNP Project Development 3
This is the first of three courses leading to the completion of the DNP project. Included in this course are 120 practicum hours working on the DNP project. Topics to be addressed include: ethics in project development and implementation; completion of a systematic review of the relevant literature; and design and approval of the DNP project. Division of the 3 credit hours: 1 hour is theory/didactic; 2 hours are practicum.

NURS 802 DNP Project Implementation 6
This is the second of the three DNP project courses. The DNP project is implemented in clinical practice; 300 practicum hours are required. Formal peer critique is included in this course. Students will synthesize knowledge from previous coursework and apply concepts to their DNP project. Division of the 6 credit hours: 1 hour is theory/didactic; 5 hours are practicum; CR/NC course.

NURS 804 DNP Proj. Analysis & Dissemination 3
This is the final course in the program. The focus on this course is for the student to analyze and disseminate their project. This course requires 120 practicum hours. Division of the 3 credit hours: 1 hour is theory/didactic; 2 hours are practicum. Credit/No Credit

NURS 898 Final Project Research & Writing 1
Registration for this course gives students access to library and computer resources while finishing the requirements for the DNP project. It can only be taken after all other requirements have been satisfied. Can be taken as many times as needed until project is completed. This is a 14-week course. Credit/No Credit.

Master of Arts in Environmental Education

Professor D. Ostergren, Director of the graduate program in environmental education
Associate Professor J. Schramm
Assistant Professors B. Minter, J. Pontius
Instructor M. Stoltzfus

Introduction

The master of arts in environmental education program is based at Merry Lea Environmental Learning Center of Goshen College and is housed in the Sustainability and Environmental Education Department (SEED). Distinctive aspects of this 11-month program include an immersion in natural history, exposure to many forms of environmental education, developing leadership skills, and building curriculum through investigation and research. Students also engage with environmental education programs at Merry Lea for grades K-12. The degree has four major components: core courses, a project, an international experience, and an extensive practicum. Students integrate ecological learning with developing pedagogical skills. Additional practical concepts include land management, environmental policy, leadership, and administration. See www.goshen.edu/graduate/environmental-education for more details.

Admission information

Requirements for admission include an essay, a resume, three letters of recommendation and official transcripts for all undergraduate and graduate coursework.  In addition, applicants must complete the Confidential Health Report form prior to enrollment and provide proof of health insurance.  A limited number of scholarships are available for environmental education graduate students, tied to the Merry Lea mission and goals.

Tuition information

  • M.A. in Environmental Education (per credit hour) $850
    (11 month, 33 credit hour program)

Career opportunities

Graduates work as environmental educators in diverse settings such as nature centers, outdoor education programs, camps, parks and recreation programs, state and federal agencies, public and private K-12 schools, post-secondary education, and independent environmental organizations.

Master of arts in environmental education

33 credit hours

Summer I: July-August

  • EnEd 510, Natural History of the Southern Great Lakes 3
  • EnEd 515, Research Methods and Measurements 3
  • EnEd 520, Principles of Environmental Education 3

Fall: September-December

  • EnEd 530, Leadership and Administration for EE 3
  • EnEd 560, Creative Project and Paper 1
  • EnEd 570, Professional Field Studies in Environmental Education 2
  • EnEd 580, Practicum in Environmental Education 3

Spring: January-April

  • EnEd 525, Environmental Issues & History 3
  • EnEd 535, Land Management for EE 2
  • EnEd 550, Faith, Peacemaking & the Environment 1
  • EnEd 561, Creative Project and Paper II1
  • EnEd 575, International Environmental Education 3

Summer II: May

  • EnEd 536, Land Management for EE II1
  • EnEd 562, Creative Project and Paper III2
  • EnEd 581, Practicum in Environmental Education II2

MAEE Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the environmental education program, graduates will:

  1. Exhibit and promote systems thinking by integrating knowledge from multiple disciplines into the design and delivery of environmental education.
  2. Demonstrate an approach to environmental education that reflects an understanding of ecological processes common to all systems in rural, natural and urban settings.
  3. Be proficient in the design, implementation, and assessment of environmental education programs and be familiar with the use of sociological research methods for evaluation.
  4. Be competent in teaching skills and practices needed for the delivery of experiential, inquiry and field-based environmental education programs.
  5. Be able to recommend and utilize best practices in leading people in the context of environmental education, to facilitate policy and/or behavioral change in individuals, organizations, and society in order to improve or preserve our environment.
  6. Be able to evaluate resources and apply skills necessary for managing resources for the successful delivery of environmental education programs.

Environmental education courses

ENED 510 Natural History of So. Great Lakes 3
A study of the plants and animals of this region - and the ecosystems in which they are found. Emphasis on the 1) the interrelationships in ecosystems 2) the function of ecosystems, both how they operate and how they impact surrounding systems and humans, and 3) identity of the organisms that comprise the ecological community. Students will investigate the ecological relationships of the organisms identified as well as behaviors and life cycles.

ENED 515 Research Methods 3
This course investigates a wide range of research strategies that an environmental educator may use and/or encounter in the course of their career. The applied approach is primarily as a leader or director who is either evaluating an existing program, or designing a new program. We will also review and interpret both qualitative and quantitative studies (i.e. gathering information on people or natural resources) in ecological, social, and educational research.

ENED 520 Principles of Environmental Educ 3
A study of distinctive concepts and skills needed for delivering quality environmental education programs. The following themes-within the context of natural history-will be part of the course: field-based and experiential education, inquiry, questioning, interpretation, physical settings, responsive instruction, program design, assessment and evaluation, and learner outcomes.

ENED 525 Environmental Issues & History 3
A study of current environmental issues facing society. Topics include ethics, citizenry, environmental justice, theological implications, and organizations addressing issues. The various facets of the history of environmental education and outdoor education will be reviewed. A study of important literature relevant to all topics will be included.

ENED 530 Leadership & Admin for Env Educ 3
This is a survey course on the essential skills and practices in leadership and administration of non-profit organizations. Topics include personnel management, strategic planning, personality styles, financial and resource management, budget preparation, board utilization, fundraising and capital campaign, day-to-day functioning of a nature center, and team development.

ENED 535 Land Management for Env Education 2
This is a study of both the theory and practice of managing the "place" for various ecological functions and human values that enhance an environmental education experience. Includes how land management practices need to reflect the economic/social/spiritual values of humans, and the biological functions of the ecosystems it encompasses.

ENED 536 Land Management for EE II 1
Part two of this class. This is a study of both the theory and practice of managing the "place" for various ecological functions and human values that enhance an environmental education experience. Includes how land management practices need to reflect the economic/social/spiritual values of humans, and the biological functions of the ecosystems it encompasses.

ENED 550 Faith, Peacemaking and Environment 1
Environmental quality and care for creation are emerging as important components to faith, peace and justice across the globe. Creation care builds on spiritual and theological foundations that inspire us to care for God's creation. Environmental justice is the equitable distribution of costs and benefits from utilizing resources to all people regardless of class, generation, ethnic origin or gender. This seminar is a survey course of these topics.

ENED 560 Creative Project and Paper 1 ()
Your project is intended to be driven by your passion and interest in a topic within one of following themes: a) an environmental issue b) an ecological problem, or c) pedagogical challenges. The Creative Project is just that: a look into a challenging issue that requires creative insight.This is an applied experience and project that can be useful long into your career. Repeated for a total of 5 credit hours.

ENED 561 Creative Project and Paper II 1
Part two of your project is intended to be driven by your passion and interest in a topic within one of following themes: a) an environmental issue b) an ecological problem, or c) pedagogical challenges and possible solutions. The Creative Project is just that: a look into a challenging issue that requires creative insight. Repeated for a total of 5 credit hours.

ENED 562 Creative Project & Paper III 2
Your project is intended to be driven by your passion and interest in a topic within one of following themes: a) an environmental issue b) an ecological problem, or c) pedagogical challenges and possible solutions. The Creative Project is just that: a look into a challenging issue that requires creative insight. Repeated for a total of 5 credit hours.

ENED 570 Professional Field Studies in EE 2 (1-2)
In this course students travel with several faculty members throughout the region to encounter a wide variety of interdisciplinary programs, nature centers, pedagogies, leadership styles, and management strategies in environmental education (EE). They also investigate critical issues in EE and the decision-making process that will affect them, as educators, throughout their careers. Each student develops professional connections, practical resources, and, through written reflection, an understanding of EE in the broadest sense.

ENED 575 International Environmental Educ 3
Located on Andros Island in the Bahamas, this three-week, immersion style, cross-cultural experience is designed to learn about a new ecosystem and work with Bahamians to design EE curriculum within an international context. Participants will investigate a broad spectrum of opportunities and challenges for international non-profits delivering EE to local students, and/or in conjunction with tourism. The tourism on Andros Island is low-key compared to the more developed islands, and features an immense coral reef and a 1,000 sq. mile national park. Although the stay is relatively brief, students will work with the Andros Conservancy and Trust (founded in 1999) to design place-based curriculum; learn about the relationships between NGOs, government agencies, and businesses; apply natural history skills in a different ecosystem; and investigate first hand the implications of climate change on an island nation.

ENED 580 Practicum in Environmental Educ 3 ()
Being part of the delivery of Merry Lea's K-12 onsite and outreach programs in environmental education will fulfill the practicum in three major programming time blocks, giving students experience in multiple programs. Student will also have opportunities in specialty programs, such as summer camps and public programs. Assessment of student performance will occur after each of the three programming time blocks and as part of the final evaluation. Repeated for a total of 6 credit hours.

ENED 581 Practicum in Environmental Ed II 2
Being part of the delivery of Merry Lea's K-12 onsite and outreach programs in environmental education will fulfill the practicum in three major programming time blocks, giving students experience in multiple programs. Student will also have opportunities in specialty programs, such as summer camps and public programs. Assessment of student performance will occur after each of the three programming time blocks and as part of the final evaluation. Repeated for a total of 6 credit hours.

ENED 698 Final Project Research & Writing 1
Registration for this course gives students access to library and computer resources while finishing research and writing for the final project. Should be taken only after all other requirements have been satisfied. Can be repeated.

Graduate Semester in Sustainability Leadership

Professor D. Ostergren, Director of the graduate program in environmental education
Associate Professor J. Schramm
Assistant Professor J. Pontius

Program description

The fall Graduate Semester in Sustainability is a residential problem-based program, focused on understanding sustainable and regenerative communities by examining the local watershed. A cohort of students spends the fall semester in full-time residence at Merry Lea’s Rieth Village, where they closely evaluate day-to-day decisions and make sustainable living choices concerning both personal lifestyle and community life. They study the structures and functions of both societal systems and ecosystems at Merry Lea and in the surrounding region. Students engage in critical issues of local concern. Students and faculty from diverse backgrounds and expertise engage with people from the local community who are faced with real environmental issues. They grapple with the complexity of and interdisciplinary nature of possible solutions.

Tuition information

  • Sustainability semester tuition $17,270
  • Room $2,905
  • Board $450

Graduate Sustainability Semester

12 credit hours

  • Sust 510, Integrated Social and Ecological Systems 4
  • Sust 540, Empowering Sustainable Communities 4
  • Sust 580, Community Leadership in Sustainability 4

Sustainability courses

SUST 510 Integrated Soc/Ecological Systems 4
The focus of this course is on understanding landscapes, ecological systems, social systems and their interconnection. Emphasis will be on how these interdependent systems contribute to the ecological, economic, and social health of a region, and models of systems thinking for understanding both the natural and social communities will be employed.

SUST 540 Empowering Sustainable Communities 4
This course considers the ethical, political, spiritual and structural frameworks that have led to our current unsustainable models of social systems and explores potential changes that could lead to more regenerative and sustainable communities for the future. There is an emphasis on understanding how societal changes occur and how communities can work toward a higher level of resiliency for future challenges.

SUST 580 Leadership Exp in Sustainability 4
This course works to help students develop and understand the role of individual agency in motivating and implementing societal and behavioral change. A large portion of this course is an applied learning experience where students engage with a group or organization within the region that is working on a sustainability initiative. Students take on the responsibility and leadership for a portion of the initiative and learn skills both in sustainability work and community partnership.

Master of Business Administration

George Lehman, Program Director (Bluffton University)
Michelle Horning, Program Director (Goshen College)
Jerrell Ross Richer, professor of economics

A full list of faculty teaching in the Collaborative MBA program can be found at http://collaborativemba.org/faculty/

Introduction

The collaborative MBA is an accredited 36-credit degree, designed for working professionals, that can be completed in 22 months. It has a values-based curriculum that develops “leadership for the common good.” This online program, delivered using live videoconferencing, is highly interactive and includes two weeks of residency, one at the beginning, at one of the collaborating schools: Goshen College, Bluffton University, Canadian Mennonite University, or Eastern Mennonite University, and one week at an international setting after a year of course work.  The collaborative arrangement ensures a variety of qualified professors and a diverse cohort of students.

Leadership for the common good

Leadership for the Common Good is a unique perspective that the four collaborating colleges/universities bring to leadership education.

Personal Formation  – Developing authentic leaders on a journey of integration, spiritual growth, and maturity: Leaders who understand that personal, business, organizational, and community existence and success are tied to the sustainability of local and global systems.

Competency – Developing transformative leaders who design businesses and organizations and nurture communities to be resilient and sustainable with skills in entrepreneurship, shared vision development, mutual accountability, financial integrity, continuous innovation, empowerment of people and teams, and systems thinking.

Relationships  – Understanding that in community we build and maintain trustworthy relationships with each other and God and that problem solving must be contextual, based on constituent and community life conditions. In this context, we transform personal, business, organizational, and community conflicts into healthy outcomes.

Admission requirements

  1. Bachelor’s degree (or equivalent) from an accredited institution.
  2. Proficiency in Microsoft Word, Powerpoint, and Excel.
  3. Strong written and oral communication and quantitative skills.
  4. Significant professional experience in a business or organizational leadership role. For applicants with less than seven years of professional work experience, GMAT or GRE scores are required. Those with seven years of work experience are encouraged to take either the GMAT or GRE if their academic and workplace records do not show strong quantitative and communication skills.

Information about application requirements and application materials can be found at https://www.goshen.edu/graduate/collaborative-mba/application-requirements/.

Tuition information

  • M.B.A. in Business Administration (per credit hour) $759
    (22 month, 36 credit hour program)

Master of Business Administration

36 credit hours

  • MBA 522, Leadership and Management for the Common Good 3
  • MBA 523, Human Capital Development 3
  • MBA 541, Global Sustainability 3
  • MBA 564, Organizational Behavior 3
  • MBA 585, Financial and Managerial Accounting3
  • MBA 615, Narrative Leadership 3
  • MBA 623, Financial Management3
  • MBA 647, Strategic Marketing Management 3
  • MBA 663, Managerial Economics 3
  • MBA 670, Strategic Leadership in a Multicultural World 3
  • MBA 671, Data Analytics for Decision Making3
  • MBA 680, Sustainable Organizations and Global Citizenship3

MBA Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the program, MBA graduates will demonstrate the following outcomes.

  1. Personal Formation: Understand that personal, business, organizational, and community existence and success are tied to the sustainability of local and global systems.
  2. Competency: Demonstrate an understanding of the relationships between business, society, and the global economy as well as an understanding of how current realities are informed by history of economic systems.
  3. Competency: Apply economic theory to the functions of managerial planning and decision making.
  4. Competency: Interpret an organization’s “story” through analysis of financial information and apply that information to strategic decision making.
  5. Competency: Gather and analyze non-financial data including market research, business analytics, and environmental data, transforming it into meaningful information.
  6. Competency: Demonstrate an understanding of the various components of strategic marketing and the role of marketing in creating and communicating value for customers.
  7. Competency: Demonstrate an understanding of the key theories of organizational behavior and apply these theories to advance an organization’s mission, vision, and values.
  8. Relationships: Understand that problem solving must be contextual, based on constituent and community life conditions.

MBA Core courses

MBA 522 Leadershp/Managmnt for Common Good 3
Complexity, globalization, and competing demands characterize the realities of leading and managing organizations in today's environment. The focus of the course is on developing systemic wisdom and long-term perspective. The course combines times for self-reflection, conversation, questioning, and integration of various leadership and management theories to identify approaches to leading people, systems, and organizations in ways that bring restoration, that offer hope, and that work toward promoting the common good.

MBA 523 Human Capital Development 3
Developing human capital means creating and nurturing organizational environments in which human beings can develop and apply new ideas, competencies, skills, attitudes, and behaviors. This course will enhance knowledge and understanding of the value created by an engaged workforce and will focus on supporting employees developing skills and abilities in an intrinsically engaging environment. In addition we will study ways individuals and organizations benefit from well-managed conflict while limiting destructive conflicts that sap organizational creativity and energy.

MBA 541 Global Sustainability 3
The global economic system produces goods and services on a massive scale. Consumers benefit from access to necessities as well as increased comfort, convenience and choice. Producers benefit from opportunities to innovate and invest, while also providing employment and generating returns to investors. The question many are asking, however, is simple: Can the current system be sustained in the long run? To be sustainable, businesses and nonprofit organizations must find ways to generate value and minimize waste while simultaneously satisfying human needs and protecting ecological systems. This course examines the global economic system from a triple-bottom line perspective--planet, people and profit. It utilizes systems thinking and explores seven forms of capital: financial, manufactured, natural, human, social, cultural and spiritual.

MBA 564 Organizational Behavior 3
Utilizing an experiential case study method, this course surveys the evolution of theory, practice, and research in the areas of organizational behavior. Learning topics include motivation theory, group dynamics, leadership, decision-making, conflict transformation, change theory, organization structure, emotional intelligence and communication. This course affirms a systemic perspective and approach to organizational behavior and affirms the concepts implicit in the concept of Leadership for the Common Good.

MBA 585 Financial & Managerial Accounting 3
Managers and executives carry fiduciary responsibility for their organizations; it is therefore imperative that they know how to read financial statements, analyze financial health, assess financial risks, and communicate this knowledge effectively to others. The course emphasizes the role of the manager relating to finance and accounting through the analysis of quantitative information largely at the conceptual level. Topics include financial governance, understanding and reading financial statements, financial statement analysis, cost behavior, breakeven analysis, budgeting, balanced scorecard, working capital management, and the use of short-term cash planning. The overall aim is to improve organizational decision-making based on financial, social, and ecological metrics.

MBA 615 Narrative Leadership 3
Effective leaders communicate to inspire talent to excel; to partner with investors and communities; to engage with customers and clients and to grow their impact in the world as part of a global community. These communications are understood and acted upon based on the perceived context of the communication. Effective leaders are attentive to the ways that they shape the narratives that form the context for this communication. This course helps leaders to shape their own story and the organizational stories to cultivate an authentic, trustworthy and compelling narrative whether oral or written, in person or embedded within social media, in small groups and with large audiences.

MBA 623 Financial Management 3
The second course of this sequence examines more of the quantitative tools managers use in decision making. Topics include an in-depth analysis of value chains, including supply chain and distribution channels, activity-based management, analysis of external funds needed, in-depth analysis of time value of money, and capital budgeting.

MBA 647 Strategic Marketing Management 3
This course focuses on the tasks of creating and communicating value and gaining loyal customers for an organization in today's dynamic global marketplace. Topics include marketing strategy and planning, marketing research, the impact of technology on strategic marketing decisions, consumer behavior, ethics in marketing, social media and its role in marketing, internet marketing, customer relationships management, database marketing, and marketing evaluation. Leadership for the Common Good concepts are also offered as a backdrop for an ethical marketing framework.

MBA 663 Managerial Economics 3
This course applies insights from economic theory to the functions of managerial planning and decision making within a market-oriented business context. Specific content includes an overview of the market system, consumer demand theory, cost analysis, profit analysis, pricing strategies, the economics of technical change and innovation, the architecture of the firm, employee incentives, international economic impacts and government regulation. Leadership for the Common Good concepts are also offered as competing methods of improving the traditional market system.

MBA 670 Strategic Leadership in a Multicul 3
Historically the field of strategy has focused on strategies as mechanisms for winning and thus causing others to lose. Instead, we are learning that strategic partnerships and creation of manufacturing/service processes that develop human capabilities and use material resources wisely are needed to position the organization for sustained success in the marketplace. This course will help leaders develop approaches that strategically position their organizations to achieve this success. Theoretically this course will be grounded in Michael Porter's recent work on "creating shared value."

MBA 671 Data Analytics & Decision Making 3
The quality of decision making in organizations is greatly influenced by the quality of data gathered and by information derived from that data. This course focuses on the use of tools and processes to enhance corporate decision-making strategies. Topics include research design, survey development, defining data and information requirements, how and where data is stored, informatics and business intelligence, critical thinking, and transforming data into meaningful information.

MBA 680 Sustainable Org and Global Citizen 3
This course integrates the three pillars of The Collaborative MBA program of management, leadership and stewardship for organizational effectiveness and serving the common good. This course will be integrated with an international residency, most likely in a low-income country, and is designed to engage the students as reflective practitioners. This will involve a working case study to integrate student learning from other courses as well as additional case studies and readings on sustainable development and collaborative innovation. This "live" organizational case will demonstrate students' creative mastery of the MBA curriculum and the triple bottom line.

Directories

Goshen College board of directors

Malinda Berry
Elkhart, Ind.

Conrad J. Clemens
Tucson, Ariz.

Susan Fisher Miller, secretary
Evanston, Il.

David Gautsche
Lancaster, Pa.

Cristina Hernandez
Tegucigalpa, FM
Honduras

Felipe Hinojosa
College Station, Texas

Ken Hochstetler
Goshen, Ind.

Gerry Horst
New Holland, Pa.

Bart Miller
Oak Park, Il.

Dan Nussbaum
Oakville, Ontario

Timothy Oyer
Boston, Mass.

John Powell
Ypsilanti, Mich.

Bruce Stahly, chair
Goshen, Ind.

Myrtis Yake
West Orange, NJ

Aaron Zou
Bristol, Ind.

Tom Stuckey, ex-oficio
Interim Executive Director
Mennonite Education Agency

Faculty

Cabinet

Rebecca J. Stoltzfus, Ph.D.
President, Professor of Biology
B.A., Goshen College, 1984; M.A. 1988, Ph.D. 1992, Cornell University. GC, 2017-.

Jodi H. Beyeler, M.B.A.
Vice President for Communications and People Strategy
B.A., 2000, M.B.A., 2019, Goshen College. GC, 2003-.

Dominique Burgunder-Johnson, M.B.A.
Vice President for Marketing and Enrollment
B.A., Goshen College, 2006; M.B.A. Eastern Mennonite University, 2016. GC, 2015-.

Gilberto Pérez, Jr., M.S.W.
Vice President for Student Life and Dean of Students
B.S., Eastern Mennonite University, 1994; M.S.W., Universidad Interamericana (Puerto Rico), 2001. GC, 2012-.

Deanna Risser, M.B.A.
Vice President for Finance
B.A., Bluffton University, 1993 ; M.B.A., Indiana University South Bend, 2007 . GC, 1999-.

Ann M. Vendrely, Ed.D., D.P.T.
Vice President for Academic Affairs & Academic Dean, Professor of Kinesiology
B.A., Goshen College, 1985; M.S., University of Indianapolis, 1987; Ed.D., Loyola University, 2002; D.P.T., Regis University, 2008. GC, 2018-.

Kathleen Yoder, B.A.
Executive Assistant – Office of the President
B.A., Goshen College, 1985. GC, 2012-.

Todd A. Yoder, B.A.
Vice President for Institutional Advancement
B.A., Goshen College, 1985. GC, 2012-.

 

Graduate Faculty

Michelle Horning, C.P.A., M.S.
MBA Program Director, Business Department Chair, Professor of Accounting
B.A., Goshen College, 1991; M.S., Drexel University,
1995. GC, 1998-.

William F. Minter, M.S.F.
Merry Lea Director of Land Management, Assistant Professor of Environmental Science
B.S., Colorado State University, 1980; M.S.F., Purdue University, 1989. GC,
1991-.

David Ostergren, Ph.D.
Director of Graduate Program in Environmental Education, Professor of Sustainability and Environmental Education
B.S., 1982, M.Ed. 1992, University of Minnesota; M.A., 1997, Ph.D., 1997, West Virginia University. GC, 2008-.

Joel Pontius, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Environmental Education
B. S., Indiana University, 2006; M.S., 2011, Ph.D., 2014, University of Wyoming. GC, 2015-.

Jerrell Ross Richer, Ph.D.
Professor of Economics
B. A., Goshen College, 1985; M.A., 1988, Ph.D., 1991, University of California-Santa Barbara. GC, 2007-.

Jonathon Schramm, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Sustainability and Environmental Education
B. A. & B.S., Calvin College, 2001; Ph.D., Rutgers University, 2008. GC, 2012-.

Susan Setiawan, M.S.N., N.P.-C
Associate Professor of Nursing
B.A. 1992, B.S.N. 1995, M.S.N. 2013, Goshen College; Doctoral Candidate, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. GC, 2012-.

Jeanette Shown, M.S
Associate Professor of Computer Science and Information Technology
B.S. Indiana State University, 1979; M.S., University of Notre Dame,  1981; Graduate study (ABD), University of Washington. GC, 2015-.

Brenda S. Srof, Ph.D., C.N.L.-C
Chair of the Nursing Department, Professor of Nursing
B.S.N., Goshen College, 1982; M.S.N., Oral Roberts University, 1986; Ph.D., Loyola University, 2004. GC, 1988-.

Jody Srof, M.S.N., P.C.N.S.
Associate Professor of Nursing
B.S.N., Goshen College, 1982; M.S.N., Oral Roberts University, 1986. GC, 2015-.

Ruth Stoltzfus, Ph.D., C.P.N.P.-PC
Director of the Graduate Program in Nursing, Co-director DNP Program, Professor of Nursing
B.S.N., Goshen College, 1979; M.S.N., C.P.N.P., 1987; Ph.D., Indiana University/Purdue University Indianapolis, 2012. GC, 2000-.

Laura Wheeler, D.N.P., F.N.P.-BC
Professor of Nursing
B.S.N., 1997, M.S.N., University of Cincinnati, 1998. D.N.P., Maryville University, 2015. GC, 2008-.