Acadenics

 

Communication

Seth Conley, Assistant Professor of Communication
Kyle Hufford, Assistant Professor of Communication
Pat Lehman, Professor of Communication
Jason Samuel, Assistant Professor of Communication, General Manager of 91.1 FM The Globe
Duane Stoltzfus, Department Chair, Professor of Communication

Introduction

The Communication department offers four majors and four minors. Two additional minors are offered in collaboration with other departments. In addition, secondary education certification is available in journalism.

The four majors prepare students to engage in meaningful service and fulfilling careers in communication fields. The four Communication department minors can combine with any major to provide valuable professional skills. The writing minor, offered in collaboration with the English department, may focus on either journalistic or creative writing. The multimedia communication minor is offered in collaboration with art, computer science and business information systems departments. Students in this program learn to design and develop web sites and CD-ROM presentations that convey information effectively and aesthetically.

Majors

Minors

Communication students at Goshen College have numerous opportunities to apply their classroom learning and to test their vocational interests. Students can develop leadership skills in broadcasting (WGCS: The Globe), journalism (Maple Leaf and Record), public address (the C. Henry Smith Peace Oratorical Contest), public relations (Public Relations Student Society of America), and video production (GC-TV). Student journalism organizations are based in a Communication Center with a full-service newsroom and suite of offices. The Globe studios feature state-of-the-art digital and computer-based equipment with satellite connections; GC-TV also is equipped with digital and computer-based production and editing equipment. Faculty members are especially attuned to contemporary ethical issues in communication fields and attempt to bring the college’s Christian orientation to bear on these issues.

Visit the Communication department website at www.goshen.edu/communication.

Career and postgraduate opportunities

Graduates have pursued vocations as broadcasters, reporters, editors, public relations and advertising practitioners, educators, attorneys, business executives and church leaders.

Teacher education certification in journalism

Teacher certification is available for grades 5-12 in journalism education. Courses needed in addition to the journalism major are Comm 190, Comm 260, and 30 credits of education courses, including a semester of student teaching. The first education class, Educ 201, should be taken in May term of the first year or fall of the sophomore year. See the education department pages and the Teacher Education Handbook for more details about requirements.

Major in broadcasting

45 credit hours

  • Comm 190, Introduction to Radio 1
  • Comm 195, Introduction to TV News 1
  • Comm 200, Communication Practice 2
  • Comm 202, Oral Communication3
  • Comm 204, Expository Writing 3
  • Comm 212, Digital Media Production 3
  • Comm 240, Communication Research 3
  • Comm 250, Writing for Media 3
  • Comm 260, Broadcast Writing 3
  • Comm 270, Media Law and Ethics 3
  • Comm 290, Radio Operations 1
  • Comm 312, Advanced Digital Media Production 3
  • Comm 360, Broadcasting for the Public Good 3
  • Comm 383, Communication and Society 3
  • Comm 409, Internship 4
  • Comm 410, Senior Seminar 3
  • Additional course(s): 3
    Comm 294, Advanced DM Methods: Pre-production
    Comm 296, Advanced DM Methods: Production
    Comm 298, Advanced DM Methods: Post-production
    Comm 314, Advanced Digital Media Immersion
    Comm 324, Principles of Public Relations
    Comm 326, Creating for the Web
    Comm 386, Film
    Comm 412, Special Project
    Thea 235, Power of Story
    Thea 320, Expressive Voice
  • At least four semesters participation in WGCS and/or GCTV NC

Student learning outcomes

Graduates in broadcasting will:

  1. Comprehend a core of knowledge in the field.
  2. Create a diverse portfolio that reflects multimedia storytelling.
  3. Demonstrate a set of professional skills and competencies in their practice of broadcasting.
  4. Serve the college and broader public through co-curricular media involvement.
  5. Demonstrate competence in securing and completing two or more internships.
  6. Report that courses and other collegiate training prepared them for a position in broadcasting or a related career.
  7. Integrate Christian values, professional conduct and a global perspective.

Planning guide for all Communication department majors

First year

Goshen Core
Communication Research
100-299 level courses in major

Second year Goshen Core
Media Law and Ethics
Expository Writing
Other courses in major
SST
Third year Goshen Core
Communication and Society
Courses in major
Fourth year Balance of Goshen Core
Balance of major
Internships
Senior Seminar

Planning and advising notes for all Communication department majors

Comm 200, Communication Practice should be with a co-curricular closely related to the area of concentration. The Comm 409, Internship should be in the student’s area of concentration. The broadcasting, journalism and public relations majors require two internships: one for three credit hours and a second for one credit hour. A portfolio or its equivalent is required for graduation.

All Communication department majors and minors must earn a grade of C- or higher in all courses required for their major and/or minor. Failure to attain this level of achievement requires the student to either repeat the course (for specific requirements) or take an additional course (an option for elective courses) and achieve a grade of C- or higher.

A maximum of 45 credit hours in communication courses may be applied to a degree. Also, no more than 12 credit hours in experiential learning (Comm 200, 209, 409 or 412) may be applied.

Major in communication

41 credit hours (core and one concentration area)

Core courses (23 credit hours):

  • Comm 200, Communication Practice 2
  • Comm 202, Oral Communication3
  • Comm 204, Expository Writing 3
  • Comm 240, Communication Research 3
  • Comm 270, Media Law and Ethics 3
  • Comm 383, Communication and Society 3
  • Comm 409, Internship 3
  • Comm 410, Senior Seminar 3

Film studies concentration (19 credit hours)

  • Comm 212, Digital Media Production 3
  • Comm 386, Film 3
  • CCCU Film Studies Program 13
  • At least four semesters participation in GCTV and/or theater NC

Note: The film studies concentration cannot be completed solely in residence at Goshen College. It requires one full semester at the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities’ Los Angeles Film Studies Center, or an approved alternative off-campus program, including Comm 409. Recommended electives: Comm 255, Comm 312, Comm 412, Engl 230, Thea 235, Thea 245, Thea 332, Thea 334, Thea 338.

Generalist concentration (18 credit hours)

  • Any communication courses, with adviser's approval 9
  • Any upper level (300 and above) communication or related courses, with adviser's approval 9
  • At least four semesters participation in Communication department productions NC

Multimedia communication concentration (18 credit hours)

  • Bus 220, Office Software Productivity 3
  • Comm 108, Digital Design 3
  • Comm 326, Creating for the Web 3
  • Comm 375, Animation3
  • Two courses selected from the following: 6
    Art 107, Design
    Art 208, Typography
    Comm 190, Introduction to Radio
    Comm 212, Digital Media Production
    Comm 255, Photo Communication
    Comm 312, Advanced Digital Media Production
    Comm 412, Special Project
  • At least four semesters participation in WGCS, GCTV, or The Record NC

Student learning outcomes

Graduates in communication will:

  1. Comprehend a core of knowledge in the field.
  2. Create a diverse multimedia portfolio.
  3. Demonstrate a set of professional skills and competencies in their practice of communication.
  4. Serve the college and broader public through co-curricular media involvement.
  5. Demonstrate competence in securing and completing one or more internships.
  6. Report that courses and other collegiate training prepared them for a position in communication or a related career.
  7. Integrate Christian values, professional conduct and a global perspective.

Major in journalism

45 credit hours

  • Comm 200, Communication Practice 2
  • Comm 202, Oral Communication3
  • Comm 204, Expository Writing 3
  • Comm 212, Digital Media Production 3
  • Comm 240, Communication Research 3
  • Comm 250, Writing for Media 3
  • Comm 270, Media Law and Ethics 3
  • Comm 326, Creating for the Web 3
  • Comm 350, Reporting for the Public Good 3
  • Comm 383, Communication and Society 3
  • Comm 409, Internship 4
  • Comm 410, Senior Seminar 3
  • Selected from the following courses: 9
    Comm 108, Digital Design
    Comm 190, Introduction to Radio
    Comm 255, Photo Communication
    Comm 260, Broadcast Writing
    Comm 290, Radio Operations
    Comm 308, Feature Writing
    Comm 312, Advanced Digital Media Production
    Comm 324, Principles of Public Relations
    Comm 385, Studies in Communication: Religious Journalism
    Comm 386, Film
    Comm 412, Special Project
    Engl 334, Writing Creative Nonfiction
    Thea 235, The Power of Story
    WGS 375, Gender in Popular Culture
  • At least four semesters participation in GCTV, Record, Maple Leaf, and/or WGCS NC

Student learning outcomes

Graduates in journalism will:

  1. Comprehend a core of knowledge in the field.
  2. Create a diverse portfolio that reflects multimedia storytelling.
  3. Demonstrate a set of professional skills and competencies in their practice of journalism.
  4. Serve the college and broader public through co-curricular media involvement.
  5. Demonstrate competence in securing and completing two or more internships.
  6. Report that courses and other collegiate training prepared them for a position in journalism or a related career.
  7. Integrate Christian values, professional conduct and a global perspective.

Major in public relations

46 credit hours

  • Bus 316, Principles of Marketing 3
  • Bus 336, Advertising 3
  • One of the following courses:3
    Comm 108, Digital Design
    Art 107, Design
  • Comm 200, Communication Practice 2
  • Comm 202, Oral Communication3
  • Comm 204, Expository Writing 3
  • Comm 240, Communication Research 3
  • Comm 250, Writing for Media 3
  • Comm 270, Media Law and Ethics 3
  • Comm 322, Organizational Communication 3
  • Comm 324, Principles of Public Relations 3
  • Comm 383, Communication and Society 3
  • Comm 409, Internship 4
  • Comm 410, Senior Seminar 3
  • Comm 412, Special Project: Events 1
  • Selected from the following courses: 3
    Art 208, Typography
    Bus 121, Introduction to Entrepreneurship
    Bus 220, Office Software Productivity
    Bus 315, Principles of Management
    Bus 319, Leading Nonprofit Organizations
    Bus 338, Sales
    Comm 190, Introduction to Radio
    Comm 255, Photo Communication
    Comm 260, Broadcast Writing
    Comm 308, Feature Writing
    Comm 326, Creating for the Web
    Comm 350, Reporting for the Public Good
    Comm 412, Special Projects
    Thea 235, The Power of Story
  • At least four semesters participation in GCTV, Record, Maple Leaf, Public Relations Student Society of America and/or WGCS NC

Student learning outcomes

Graduates in public relations will:

  1. Comprehend a core of knowledge in the field.
  2. Create a diverse portfolio that reflects their work in public relations.
  3. Demonstrate a set of professional skills and competencies in their practice of public relations.
  4. Serve the college and broader public through co-curricular media involvement.
  5. Demonstrate competence in securing and completing two or more internships.
  6. Report that courses and other collegiate training prepared them for a position in public relations or a related career.
  7. Integrate Christian values, professional conduct and a global perspective.
  8. Gain experience in practicing public relations as members of a team.

Minor in broadcasting

18 credit hours

  • Comm 212, Digital Media Production 3
  • Comm 260, Broadcast Writing 3
  • Comm 360, Broadcasting for the Public Good 3
  • Comm 409, Internship 3
  • Courses selected from the following, at least 2 credit hours upper level (300 and above): 6
    Comm 190, Introduction to Radio
    Comm 195, Introduction to TV News
    Comm 202, Oral Communication
    Comm 204, Expository Writing
    Comm 240, Communication Research
    Comm 250, Writing for Media
    Comm 270, Media Law and Ethics
    Comm 290, Radio Operations
    Comm 312, Advanced Digital Media Production
    Comm 383, Communication and Society

Minor in communication

18 credit hours

  • Comm 240, Communication Research 3
  • Comm 383, Communication and Society 3
  • Concentration courses selected with adviser's approval 12

Planning and advising notes

In the minor concentration, at least 5 credit hours must be upper level (300 and above), with at least 9 credit hours in communication and at least 6 taken at Goshen College.

Minor in journalism

18 credit hours

  • Comm 212, Digital Media Production 3
  • Comm 250, Writing for Media 3
  • Comm 350, Reporting for the Public Good 3
  • Comm 409, Internship 3
  • Courses selected from the following, at least 2 credit hours upper level (300 and above): 6
    Comm 108, Digital Design
    Comm 190, Introduction to Radio
    Comm 255, Photo Communication
    Comm 260, Broadcast Writing
    Comm 290, Radio Operations
    Comm 308, Feature Writing
    Comm 312, Advanced Digital Media Production
    Comm 326, Creating for the Web
    Comm 385, Studies in Communication: Religious Journalism
    Comm 412, Special Projects

Minor in public relations

18 credit hours

  • Bus 316, Principles of Marketing 3
  • Comm 250, Writing for Media 3
  • Comm 322, Organizational Communication 3
  • Comm 324, Principles of Public Relations 3
  • Courses selected from the following: 6
    Bus 319, Leading Nonprofit Organizations
    Bus 336, Advertising
    Comm 108, Digital Design
    Comm 190, Introduction to Radio
    Comm 200, Communicaton Practice
    Comm 202, Oral Communication
    Comm 212, Digital Media Production
    Comm 240, Communication Research
    Comm 255, Photo Communication
    Comm 260, Broadcast Writing
    Comm 270, Media Law and Ethics
    Comm 290, Radio Operations
    Comm 308, Feature Writing
    Comm 312, Advanced Digital Media Production
    Comm 326, Creating for the Web
    Comm 385: Studies in Communication: Religious Journalism
    Comm 409, Internship
    Comm 412, Special Project

Minor in multimedia communication

18 credit hours

  • Art 108, Digital Design 3
  • Bus 220, Office Software Productivity 3
  • Comm 326, Creating for the Web 3
  • Art/Comm 375, Animation3
  • Two courses selected from the following, at least 2 credit hours upper level (300 and above) 6
    Art 107, Design
    Art 208, Typography
    Art 308, Graphic Design
    Bus 336, Advertising
    Comm 212, Digital Media Production
    Comm 250, Writing for Media
    Comm 312, Advanced Digital Media Production

Student learning outcomes

Graduates in multimedia communication will:

  1. Comprehend a core of knowledge in the field.
  2. Create a diverse portfolio that reflects multimedia aesthetic proficiencies.
  3. Demonstrate a set of professional skills and competencies in their practice of multimedia communication.

Minor in writing

18 credit hours

  • Comm/Engl 204, Expository Writing 3
  • One of the following individualized courses:3
    Comm 412, Special Project
    Engl 280, Sophomore Portfolio and Engl 408, Senior Writing Practicum
  • Courses in journalistic and/or creative writing selected from the following 12
    Comm 250, Writing for Media
    Comm 260, Broadcast Writing
    Comm 308, Feature Writing
    Comm 326, Creating for the Web
    Comm 350, Reporting for the Public Good
    Engl 203, Introduction to Creative Writing
    Engl 312, Writing Workshop
    Engl 330, Writing Fiction
    Engl 332, Writing Poetry
    Engl 334, Writing Creative Nonfiction
    Engl 336, Special Topics in Writing
    Thea 350, Playwriting

Planning and advising notes

Students should choose an adviser from the Communication or English department faculty, depending on their particular field of interest.

Writing minors are encouraged to get involved with communication or English co-curricular activities, including The Record, The Maple Leaf, The Correspondent, Pinch Penny Press, Broadside, and Red Cents.

Students registering for Comm 412, Special Projects or Engl 408, English Writing Practicum must meet with an adviser and have a proposal approved in the semester prior to registering.

Communication courses


COMM 108 Digital Design 3
(Cross-listed from Art 108) This course in visual expression and communication will introduce students to relevant computer programs including Adobe InDesign, Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop. Through exercises, projects and critiques, students will learn both creative visual design and technical aspects of computer-generated images and composition.

COMM 190 Introduction to Radio 1
This applied course prepares students for work at WGCS-FM. Students attend lecture-discussion periods, engage in self-study and learn to operate the station through tutorial shifts.

COMM 195 Introduction to TV News 1
Applied learning, involving work assignments on the Correspondent, the campus television news program. Focuses on television news fundamentals including field reporting, videography, directing, producing and newscast studio operations.

COMM 200 Communication Practice 1 (1-2)
Applied work in communication with the student newspaper, yearbook, GC-TV, WGCS or other on-campus communication activity. A maximum of two hours applicable toward a communication major or minor. Consent of instructor required.

COMM 202 Oral Communication 3
A study of communication theories as applied to oral communication. Practical experience in a variety of activities including interpersonal communication, public speaking, small-group communication, persuasion and nonverbal communication. Attention is given to communicating in a culturally diverse society. Theories and principles of oral communication will be studied in all sections though individual professors may structure their courses around specific themes such as Border Crossings and Oral History.

COMM 204 Expository Writing 3
(Cross-listed from Engl 204) Theory and practice of written communication. Assignments in a variety of prose forms aim at developing the student's control of logic, organization, rhetoric, usage, and audience accommodation. Prerequisite: CORE 110 or equivalent.

COMM 206 Communication Across Cultures 3
A study of cultures, comparative message systems and principles of cross-cultural communication. A focus on current issues having to do with cultural interactions. Students analyze cultural dynamics through ethnographic projects, films and simulations. This course is designed as preparation for SST or for living in settings unlike one's native home.

COMM 209 Field Experience 3 (1-3)
Experiential learning, usually in an off-campus professional setting, for communication majors and minors. The student contracts with a faculty member in regard to goals, performance expectations, supervision, evaluation and course subtitle. The 209 level is intended for first year and sophomore students. Upper level students should enroll in 409. Prerequisite: Comm 202 or 204.

COMM 212 Digital Media Production 3
An introduction to digital media with an emphasis on field video production. The primary goal of the course is the development of the necessary video and audio skills and understandings needed to create effective digital media messages. Secondary goals include providing an overview of digital video production tools and techniques and exploring aesthetic and ethical issues of media. Students will take creative responsibility for fundamental media projects.

COMM 240 Communication Research 3
An introduction to theory building and research methodology of mass communication. Course focuses on the practical aspects of communication research, providing a framework for conducting quantitative and qualitative research..

COMM 250 Writing for Media 3
An introductory newswriting course devoted to print, broadcast and multimedia environments. The course will cover new judgments and new values; reporting strategies; research techniques; forms of jounalistic writing and Associated Press style.

COMM 255 Photo Communication 3
A first course including camera work, digital image workflow and printing. Technical fluency, visual composition, photojournalistic approaches, and expression are components of the course. Students must provide a digital camera on which f-stop and shutter speed can be controlled.

COMM 260 Broadcast Writing 3
Students will study the principles, forms and techniques of writing for broadcast media. Assignments will focus on the writing and editting of broadcast news and commercial messages.

COMM 270 Media, Law & Ethics 3
A course devoted to models of ethical decision making as they are applied to mass media issues, with special attention given to Christian perspectives. The course will cover issues like access to information, accuracy, conflicts of interest, deception, fairness, libel, obscenity, plagiarism and privacy.

COMM 290 Radio Operations 1
An applied course providing advanced instruction and experience in radio station operations, emphasizing four areas: announcing, systems operations (computer-based operations, satellite downlinking, basic productions, etc.) programming and management. Course work includes assisting WGCS managers in such areas as programming, production, and operations. Prerequisite: Comm 190.

COMM 294 Adv DM Methods:Pre-production 2
Covers the advanced skills involved in the planning, conceptualizing and writing of complex productions. Emphasis will be on proper storytelling techniques for effective communication through the visual medium. Course may provide opportunities to work for and with FiveCore Media clients on projects. Prerequisite: Comm 212.

COMM 295 TV News Production 1
Applied learning, involving leadership of GC Journal. Focuses on television news producing, directing and newscast studio operations. Prerequisite:Comm 195.

COMM 296 Adv DM Methods:Production 2
Covers the advanced production skills in filming, framing, audio recording, lighting and directing. Emphasis will be on proper storytelling techniques for effective communication through the visual medium. Course may provide opportunities to work for and with FiveCore Media clients on projects. Prerequisite: Comm 212.

COMM 298 Adv DM Methods:Post-production 2
Covers advanced post-production editing, motion graphics, audio mastering, color correction and producing skills. Emphasis will be on proper storytelling techniques for effective communication through the visual medium. Course may provide opportunities to work for and with FiveCore Media clients on projects. Prerequisite: Comm 212.

COMM 308 Feature Writing 3
Students will study nonfiction writing forms, including narrative journalism, and learn the process of publishing articles in newspaper, magazine and online markets. Students will prepare articles for submissioin. Prerequisite: Comm 204 or 250 or equivalent.

COMM 312 Advanced Digital Media Production 3
Advanced study of digital media production with an emphasis on "storytelling" through field video production. The primary goal of the course is the development of advanced skills and understandings needed to create effective and professional digital media messages. Secondary goals include providing an overview of digital media production tools and techniques and exploring aesthetic and ethical issues of media. This course places emphasis on the "creative" roles of digital media production personnel such as writers, producers, directors, videographers, and video editors. Students will take creative responsibility for advanced media projects. Prerequisite: Comm 212 or consent of instructor.

COMM 314 Advanced Digital Media Immersion 3
The course focuses on advanced integration of video and audio elements in program-length productions. Students will work as members of a production team to create professional digital media projects. The primary goal of this course is immersion in a "real world" production experience. Students may play many roles as a part of the team, including producer, director, writer, videographer and video editor. Prerequisite: Comm 312 or consent of instructor.

COMM 322 Organizational Communication 3
An exploration of communication within organizations, as well as communication between organizations and the larger society. Topics include theories of communication and organizational structure; examination of power, culture, and conflict in organizations; and analysis of verbal and nonverbal messages in interpersonal, small-group and public settings. Assignments will assist students in developing skills in listening, analysis, speaking and writing. Prerequisite: Comm 240 or Bus 316.

COMM 324 Principles of Public Relations 3
Introduction to public relations contexts, issues and practices - research, planning, communicating and evaluating. Emphasis on skills in analyzing public opinion and in communication with internal and external publics, with special attention to not-for-profit organizations. Prerequisite: Comm 240 or Bus 316.

COMM 326 Creating for the Web 3
This course examines the necessary tools for building successful web pages. Students utilize design elements and principles to emphasize the importance of the web as an effective form of communication. They also learn languages of page development (HTML/CSS) and responsive web design.

COMM 350 Reporting for the Public Good 3
Journalism's role in serving the public good will be in the forefront as students discuss civic journalism, the watchdog function of the news media, tensions between profits and public service, and the advocacy of peace and justice. Students will focus on significant independent reporting projects intended to advance the public good. Prerequisite: Comm 250 or equivalent.

COMM 360 Broadcasting for the Public Good 3
This course examines the philosophical, historical, technological and social aspects of broadcast and new global electronic media industries. Students will study aspects of broadcasting and new media economics, management, audience analysis, programming, media effects, government policy and FCC regulations for the public good.

COMM 375 Animation 3
Focuses on digital animation. Students will learn the skills needed to bring characters to life as well as create visual effects using computer software. Issues in the international contemporary visual culture will also be studied. Prerequisite: Comm 326.

COMM 383 Communication and Society 3
A study of communication issues in modern society with attention to the persons, institutions, media and systems that facilitate social interaction. An overview of communication philosophy as a basis for ethical and aesthetic perspectives.

COMM 385 Studies in Communication 3
Investigations into particular communication issues: social, scientific, philosophic, historical, aesthetic, political or institutional. Focus on an institution or topic of current interest.

COMM 386 Film 3
Survey of film as art, literature and mass medium. Historical development; authors and genres; philosophical, economic and political issues. A selection of 12 films for detailed study. Emphasis on "reading" film, understanding the medium's function and exploring contemporary cinematic issues.

COMM 409 Internship 3 (1-3)
Experiential learning, usually in an off-campus professional setting, for communication majors and minors. The student contracts with a faculty member in regard to goals, performance expectations, supervision, evaluation and course subtitle. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

COMM 410 Senior Seminar 3
A consideration of ethical and professional issues in contemporary communication. Information interviews with practitioners in communication. Writing of resumes. Required of all communication majors.

COMM 412 Special Project 1 (1-3)
Students may conduct research of particular interest or pursue specialized applied projects in communication under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.