Sociology, Social Work, and Anthropology

Aileac Deegan, Adjunct Professor of Social Work
Katharine Schrock, Adjunct Professor of Social Work
Kendra Yoder, Assistant Professor of Social Work
Bob Birkey, Adjunct Professor of Social Work
Carol Jarvis, Associate Professor of Social Work
Jeanne Liechty, Department Chair, Professor of Social Work, Director of Social Work Program
David Lind, Associate Professor of Sociology
Tom Meyers, Professor of Sociology
Zulma Prieto, Adjunct Professor of Latino Studies

Introduction

The Sociology, Social Work and Anthropology department offers two majors and two minors:

Visit the department's website at www.goshen.edu/sowk

Career and postgraduate opportunities

The sociology major and minor provide a knowledge base and skills in social analysis with a variety of practical applications. The social policy minor is a collaborative cross-disciplinary program for students who want to work for social change within the public sector or nonprofit organizations. In this minor, students will develop understanding of policy making processes, community organizing and social advocacy in relation to their specific area of academic interest as well as some of the specific skills necessary for this work.

Past graduates in sociology have entered positions in foreign and domestic community development and professional and voluntary social services (not requiring professional social work training) with such agencies as Church World Service, Mennonite Central Committee and Peace Corps. The majority of graduates have gone on to attend graduate school or seminary and are presently employed in the Christian ministry, college teaching, community development, law and business, personnel management, public administration, public policy and program evaluation, research, social services, or urban planning.

The purpose of social work is the restoration and enhancement of social functioning through intervention with individuals, families, groups, larger social systems and social welfare policies and programs. The social work program is a generalist program leading to either the bachelor of arts or bachelor of science degree with a major in social work. Generalist social work practice requires a person-situation approach to problem solving, and the generalist perspective of the Goshen College social work education program provides a broad conceptual framework. The program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education and has, as its primary objective, the preparation of students for professional social work practice. Students are also prepared for graduate social work education and receive advanced standing in many graduate social work programs.

Social Work: two tracks, BASW or BSW

The social work program has both a four-year track and a 16-month accelerated track. Students who start college immediately after graduating from high school follow the four-year track and earn a BASW. Students who have graduated with an associate degree in human services and have related work experience follow the accelerated track, earning a BSW. It is possible for students with an associate degree to fit into the second half of the four-year track; however, the accelerated track is designed to provide a more accessible option for working and/or parenting adults. Both tracks follow the same social work curriculum, which builds upon a liberal arts perspective. Both tracks build on the Goshen Core curriculum with its emphasis on international, intercultural, interdisciplinary and integrative teaching and learning. The Goshen Core requirements differe somewhat for the BASW and the BSW, recognizing that BSW students are adult learners, bringing more life experience to the study of liberal arts. Both models of the Goshen Core assist students in thinking broadly about individuals, families and groups and the social systems in which they function. Liberal arts education at Goshen College is seen as a moral activity that places a high value on persons and social justice. The program outcomes for graduates are the same for students enrolled in either track; it is a generalist program leading to a bachelor of arts degree with a major in social work, accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.

Major in sociology

40 credit hours

Core courses (19 credit hours):

  • Soc 200, Principles of Sociology 3
  • Soc 310, Social Theory 3
  • Soc 334, Race, Class and Ethnic Relations 3
  • Soc 391, Methods of Social Research3
  • Soc 392, Junior Seminar in Social Research3
  • Soc 409, Field Experience in Sociology/Anthropology 3
  • Soc 410, Senior Seminar1

Elective and related courses (21 credit hours):

  • Choose four of the following courses 12
    Soc 210, Sociology of the Family
    Soc 230, Ethnography and Culture
    Soc 302, Urban Diversity (Chicago Center)
    Soc 315, Religion in Culture and Society
    Soc 320, Environmental Sociology
    Soc 336, Latin American Societies and Cultures
    Soc 340, African Societies and Cultures
    Soc 351, Contemporary Issues
  • Choose one of the following (Identities & Inequalities) 3
    Hist 330, Gender in World History
    Hist 335, History of Ethnic Conflict
    Soc 205/WGS 200, Introduction to Gender Studies
    Soc 260, Human Sexuality
    Soc 345/SoWk 345, Women's Concerns
  • Choose one of the following (Politics & Social Change) 3
    Econ 203, Principles of Microeconomics
    PJCS 360, Designing for Social Change
    PoSc 200, Introduction to Political Science
    PoSc 210, Introduction to Public Policy
    PoSc 308, International Politics
  • Choose one of the following (Sustainability & Human Ecology) 3
    Biol 207 NW, Roots of Environmental Crisis
    Econ 309, Environmental Economics
    Econ 314, Ecological Economics
    Hist 345, Environmental History

Student learning outcome

Graduates in sociology will synthesize sociological theory and method in original research.

Planning guide

First year

Goshen Core
SST language prerequisite
Principles of Sociology
Lower level sociology electives

Second year

Social Theory
Lower level sociology courses
Goshen Core
SST

Third year

Methods of Social Research
Junior Seminar in Social Research
Race, Class & Ethnic Relations
Goshen Core
Upper level sociology electives

Fourth year

Senior Seminar
Upper level sociology electives
Field experience
Balance of Goshen Core

Social work professional program: 4-year track

Admission to the social work professional program

Social work is a professional program that requires an admission process separate from admission to the college. Students apply for admission to the social work education program following successful completion of Introduction to Social Work, SoWk 224, taken in the sophomore year. Written applications are accepted after January 1 of each school year. Students transferring into the major in the junior year should apply immediately upon college admission. Admission criteria include academic and personal qualifications with a value orientation necessary for the professional practice of social work. The admission process is directed toward furthering students' personal growth as they explore vocational interests and abilities. Specific information about criteria and process is found in the Social Work Student Handbook. This may be obtained from the director of social work education.

Major in social work

53 credit hours

  • Psyc 306, Abnormal Psychology 3
  • Soc 200, Principles of Sociology 3
  • Soc 210, Sociology of the Family 3
  • Soc 334, Race, Class and Ethnic Relations 3
  • Soc 391, Methods of Social Research 3
  • SoWk 221, Human Behavior 3
  • SoWk 224, Introduction to Social Work 3
  • SoWk 321, Social Service Field Experience 3
  • SoWk 322, Social Welfare Policy & Program I3
  • SoWk 323, Social Welfare Policy & Program II4
  • SoWk 325, Social Work Practice Theory I 4
  • SoWk 409, Field Instruction 10
  • SoWk 410, Social Work Senior Seminar 2
  • SoWk 425, Social Work Practice Theory II 3
  • One of the following courses: 3
    SoWk 345, Women's Concerns
    SoWk 350, Human Services: Child Welfare
    SoWk 350, Human Services: Services to Families

Planning guide: four-year track

First year Goshen Core
Principles of Sociology
General Psychology*
Sociology of the Family
SST language prerequisite
Second year Goshen Core
Human Behavior
Introduction to Social Work
Social Service Field Experience
SST (spring or summer)
Expository Writing (strongly recommended)
Third year Goshen Core
Social Welfare Policy and Program I, II
Practice Theory I
Methods of Social Research
Race, Class and Ethnic Relations
Abnormal Psychology
Social Work Elective
Fourth year Balance of Goshen Core
Social Work Practice Theory II
Field Instruction
Senior Seminar

Student learning outcomes

Graduates in social work will demonstrate in measurable ways achievement of the ten core competencies articuloated by the Council on Social Work Education. Graduates will:

  1. Identify themselves as professional social workers and conduct themselves accordingly.
  2. Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice.
  3. Apply critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgments.
  4. Engage diversity and difference in practice.
  5. Advance human rights and social and economic justice.
  6. Engage in research-informed practice and practice-informed research.
  7. Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment.
  8. Engage in policy practice to advance social and economic well-being and to deliver effective social work services.
  9. Respond to contexts that shape practice.
  10. Engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.

Planning and advising notes

Students declaring a social work major are assigned a social work faculty adviser. Students exploring their interest in social work are invited to talk with the program director. Academic advising, which takes place in the fall and spring semesters each year, aids students in selecting courses in the sequence required for successful completion of the program. All social work courses must be taken in numbered sequence. If possible, Methods of Social Research should precede Social Work Practice Theory I. Additional advising appointments are scheduled as part of admission to the program and to field instruction. Students are encouraged to initiate contact with faculty advisers as issues arise, at any time throughout the academic year.

*Psyc 100, General Psychology is a prerequisite for Psyc 306, Abnormal Psychology. Social work majors should discuss with their adviser the option of SoWk 221 Human Behavior functioning as the prerequisite for Psych 306. Courses in human biology, statistics and expository writing are required for admission into some Master of Social Work (MSW) programs.

Academic requirements

The professional practice of social work requires acquisition of knowledge, specific skills, a firm identification with specified values and ethics and a high degree of social and personal responsibility. Students whose academic work falls below a 2.5 GPA in required social work and related courses, or whose personal or professional behavior is inconsistent with the above requirements, may be asked to leave the program. Students who are denied admission or dismissed from the program, and believe relevant policies were unfairly administered, have the right to initiate the Goshen College grievance procedure.

Social work professional program: 16-month accelerated BSW track

Admission to the social work professional program

Social work is a professional program that requires an admission process separate from admission to the college. Students apply for admission to the social work education program during Social Welfare Policy & Program I, the first social work course taken in the 16-month completion track. Written applications are accepted after October 1. Admission criteria include academic and personal qualifications with a value orientation necessary for the professional practice of social work. The admission process is directed toward furthering students' personal growth as they explore vocational interests and abilities. Specific information about criteria and process is found in the Social Work Student Handbook. This may be obtained from the director of social work education.

Goshen Core

A description of the Goshen Core for accelerated programs is located in the Graduate and Continuing Studies section of the catalog.

Major in social work (accelerated BSW program)

53 credit hours

NOTE: Since students are entering the 16-month accelerated track with an associate degree, we expect that they will be transferring in the following lower level and supporting courses. Each applicant's transcript will be evaluated to determine which requirements have been met, and individualized plans of study will be developed to address any gaps.

  • Psyc 306, Abnormal Psychology 3
  • Soc 200, Principles of Sociology 3
  • Soc 210, Sociology of the Family 3
  • Soc 334, Race, Class and Ethnic Relations 3
  • SoWk 221, Human Behavior 3
  • SoWk 224, Introduction to Social Work 3
  • SoWk 321, Social Service Field Experience 3
  • One of the following courses: 3
    SoWk 345, Women's Concerns
    SoWk 350, Human Services: Child Welfare
    SoWk 350, Human Services: Services to Families

The following upper level social work courses must be taken at Goshen College and are offered in an accelerated format:

  • Soc 391, Methods of Social Research 3
  • SoWk 322, Social Welfare Policy & Program I3
  • SoWk 323, Social Welfare Policy & Program II4
  • SoWk 325, Social Work Practice Theory I 4
  • SoWk 409, Field Instruction 10
  • SoWk 410, Social Work Senior Seminar 2
  • SoWk 425, Social Work Practice Theory II 3

Student learning outcomes

Graduates in social work will demonstrate in measurable ways achievement of the ten core competencies articulated by the Council on Social Work Education. Graduates will:

  1. Identify themselves as professional social workers and conduct themselves accordingly.
  2. Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice.
  3. Apply critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgments.
  4. Engage diversity and difference in practice.
  5. Advance human rights and social and economic justice.
  6. Engage in research-informed practice and practice-informed research.
  7. Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment.
  8. Engage in policy practice to advance social and economic well-being and to deliver effective social work services.
  9. Respond to contexts that shape practice.
  10. Engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.

Planning guide: 16-month accelerated BSW track

First year 1st 7-week term:
Proseminar
Wellness for Life
Social Welfare Policy & Program I
2nd 7-week term:
Methods of Social Research
Goshen Core (one course)
3rd 7-week term:
Goshen Core (one course)
4th 7-week term:
Goshen Core (one course)
3rd & 4th terms (14 weeks):
Social Welfare Policy & Program II
Social Work Practice Theory
5th 7-week term:
Goshen Core (two courses)
6th 7-week term:
Goshen Core (two courses)
Second year 1st 7-week term:
Social Work Practice Theory II
2nd 7-week term:
Senior Seminar
1st & 2nd 7-week terms:
Field Instruction

Minor in sociology

18 credit hours

  • Soc 200, Principles of Sociology 3
  • Soc 310, Social Theory 3
  • Soc 391, Methods of Social Research 3
  • Three courses in sociology (at least one upper level, 300 or above) 9

Planning and advising notes

The minor in sociology is not available to students majoring in social work. For elective sociology courses in the minor, courses taught from within the sociology department (not cross-listed from other departments) are strongly preferred.

Minor in social policy

18 credit hours

Core courses (9 credit hours):

  • One of the following courses: 3
    SoWk 322, Social Welfare Policy and Program I
    PoSc 210, Introduction to Public Policy
  • One of the following courses: 3
    Econ 203, Principles of Microeconomics
    Phil 302, Ethics and Morality
    Psyc 200, Social Psychology
    Soc 200, Principles of Sociology
    Soc 230, Ethnography and Culture
  • SoWk 321, Social Service Field Experience (or alternative internship) 3

Skills and methodology courses (9 credit hours):

  • Three of the following, with no more than two courses from any one department: 9
    Bus 121, Introduction to Entrepreneurship
    Bus 215, Entrepreneurial Finance
    Bus 319, Leading Nonprofit Organizations
    Comm 212, Digital Media Production I
    Comm 250, Writing for Media
    Comm 324, Principles of Public Relations
    PJCS 325, Mediation: Process, Skills and Theory
    PJCS 426, Conflict-Healthy Groups
    Soc 391, Methods of Social Research

Planning and advising notes

To obtain a minor in social policy, students must consult with their major adviser and submit a proposal of their goals and rationale for their course choices in the minor to the Social Policy Review Committee (Jan Bender Shetler, Joe Liechty, Gilberto Pérez, Jr.) for approval. At least nine credit hours in this minor must be upper level (300 level and above) courses. After the plan of study is approved and submitted to the registrar, students will continue to be advised for the minor by their major advisers. Double counting will be limited to two courses, i.e., at least 12 hours of the minor must be met through discrete courses that do not count toward a student’s major requirements.

In the social policy internship, students will gain practical experience in their specific areas of interest. Most will complete an internship through the existing course, SoWk 321, which combines 40 hours in an agency and policy setting with weekly class sessions. Students may also meet this requirement through existing departmental internship courses, provided they meet the three credit hour requirement. With approval by the social policy review committee, the internship requirement may also be met through an off-campus program such as the Chicago Center.

Sociology courses


SOC 200 Principles of Sociology 3
An introduction to the principles and methods used in the study of human society. Includes a survey of topics in social problems, social inequalities, social identity, human ecology and social change.

SOC 205 Introduction to Gender Studies 3
(Cross-listed from WGS 200) Introduction to major areas of feminist thought (historical and contemporary) that shaped the field of Women's Studies. Course objectives focus on increasing students' understandings of the social systemic factors (i.e., sociological factors) that influence women's lived experience. Readings, small group discussions, and service learning/activism projects enable students to apply feminist theory concerning women and gender in an interdisciplinary context. This course serves as an introductory survey course for the women and gender Studies minor and a topical exploration for sociology.

SOC 210 Sociology of the Family 3
A study of the role of family in society and culture. Includes a comparative history of the family institution as well as an examination of social trends affecting mate selection, marriage, family roles and family relationships in contemporary society and culture.

SOC 230 Ethnography and Culture 3
An introduction to ethnographic methods and cultural analysis. The course will operate on two interrelated dimensions, one focused on the history of ethnography and cultural analysis in anthropology and sociology, the other focused on practical techniques of qualitative research, including specific skills in qualitative research design, methods, and data analysis. The course includes an ethnographic research project.

SOC 260 Human Sexuality 3
Biographical, psychological and sociological factors determining sex-role identification and role performance; human reproduction, fertility control and sexual disorders; social and spiritual values in human sexuality; sex discrimination and movements toward sex equality.

SOC 302 Urban Diversity 3
Student is exposed to issues affecting the lives of an ethnically and religiously diverse urban populace - racism, sexism, classism - and helped to develop new ways of conceptualizing and interpreting the contemporary urban scene. Reading, research and writing are integrated with the student's first-hand involvement in issues under study. Available only through the Chicago Center or WCSC in Washington, D.C.

SOC 310 Social Theory 3
A comparative study of prominent social theorists of the past 200 years with specific attention to their interpretations of social changes related to modernity, globalization, and identity. Includes an examination of the purpose of social theory particularly as it relates to sociological inquiry. Prerequisite: Soc 200 or consent of instructor.

SOC 315 Religion in Culture and Society 3
An analysis of the social, cultural and political contexts that profoundly affect religious institutions and expressions, and upon which religion has an influence. Course includes such topics as meaning and belonging, modern individualism, dynamics of religious collectives and the impact of religion on social change.

SOC 320 Environmental Sociology 3
A survey of environmental sociology including theories of human-environment interaction, a history of various environmental movements and other developments with significant ecological implications, cross cultural comparisons of human-environment relations, and questions of justice with relation to who decides about resource use and who suffers the effects of environmental degradation.

SOC 322 Social Policy and Programs 3
(Cross-listed from SoWk 322) Economic and social justice is used as an organizing framework to study the relationship between major social problems and social welfare policy, programs and services. Included are poverty, health and mental-health care, family problems, racism, sexism and other forms of institutionalized oppression. The political aspects of social welfare policy and the legislative process itself are examined in depth. Prerequisites: SoWk 221, 224, or consent of instructor.

SOC 334 Race, Class & Ethnic Relations 3
A study of the dynamics of race and ethnic group interaction focusing on minority groups in the U.S. as defined by race, language, culture, religion or national origin. Attention is given to social class, power and majority-group dominance as factors in assimilation and culture-loss or collective self-determination and maintenance of cultural pluralism. Prerequisite: Soc 200.

SOC 336 Latin American Societies & Cultures 3
Current developments are examined within the context of a general survey of Latin-American societies and cultures. The course aims to provide: 1) a basic knowledge of Central and South-American geography and social structure, 2) an acquaintance with alternative ways of interpreting information about and experiential knowledge of Latin-American life, and 3) an opportunity to explore themes of oppression and liberation as these pertain to Latin-American thought and experience.

SOC 340 African Societies and Cultures 3
A study of the current development and modernization of the nations and peoples of Sub-Sahara Africa. After brief attention to the geographic, historical and anthropological factors underlying Africa's development, the major focus will be on the current social and political forces that are shaping the developing nations.

SOC 345 Women's Concerns 3
(Cross-listed with SoWk 345) This course covers a wide range of issues that are part of contemporary North American women's lives. The place of women in society is approached from the position of social and economic justice. The course: (a) examines and critiques the U.S. American women's movement as an interpersonal and psychological phenomenon; (b) identifies cultural, religious, racial, social, economic and political processes as they affect women's lives; (c) considers women to be persons of worth and value with the right of self-determination ; and (d) assists in understanding, contextually, women's requests for help and appropriate intervention strategies. Class participation and small group discussions are important components of course learning.

SOC 351 Contemporary Issues: 3
Study on a current social topic, problem, or issue. Examples include food and society, male identity, Latino families. Topics vary and may be requested by students.

SOC 380 Statistics in Research 3
(Cross-listed from Psyc 380) A study of data analysis and its relationship to research methods in a variety of settings. Collection, presentation and analysis of numerical data, including descriptive, parametric, and nonparametric statistics. Students are strongly encouraged to complete the Quantitative Literacy requirement in the Goshen Core before taking this course.

SOC 391 Methods of Social Research 3
An introduction to the principles and methods of social research in sociology and social work, including the project design, data analysis, and interpretation for both quantitative and qualitative research projects.

SOC 392 Junior Seminar in Social Research 3
Philosophy of science in sociology; synthesis of theory and method; choice of a topic and initial literature review, research design and piloting of any instruments in preparation for Soc 409 Field Experience and Soc 410 Senior Seminar. To be taken Spring semester of the junior year. Prerequisites: Soc 310, 391.

SOC 400 Advanced Readings 1
This independent study provides the opportunity for Sociology majors and minors to pursue more individualized, self-guided study and research in a topic of interest, and strengthen their skills and knowledge in an area of sociology or anthropology where they have not been able to do course work. Prerequiste: Soc 310, upper level standing, and consent of instructor.

SOC 409 Field Experience in Sociology 3 (3-6)
Experience in the practice of social research outside the classroom; students continue researching and developing the topic they proposed in Soc 392 Junior Seminar in Social Research in preparation for writing and presenting their thesis research in Soc 410 Senior Seminar. Prerequiste: Soc 392.

SOC 410 Senior Seminar 1
Students complete their thesis research and writing, culminating in a formal presentation of their work. Questions related to Sociology as a profession will also be addressed. Prerequisite: Soc 392.

Social work courses


SOWK 221 Human Behavior 3
A study of the individual through the life cycle within the social environment. Focus on physical, psychological, social, cultural and religious factors in the development of the self.

SOWK 224 Introduction to Social Work 3
Analysis of the knowledge base, value structure, purpose, nature, history and function of social work practice in various social welfare activities and social workers through observation and guided participation in programs for meeting human need. Students engage in a specific field experience as part of course requirements and must furnish their own transportation.

SOWK 321 Social Service Field Experience 3
Offers sophomore or junior students an initial exposure to social work practice in a social agency. The course focuses on an integrated understanding of the organizational and community context for social work practice and offers the students an opportunity for observing social work practitioners and offering specific services to clients. Classroom activities include discussion of social work related issues and concerns. Prerequisites: SoWk 221, 224 or consent of instructor. Students furnish their own transportation for field placement.

SOWK 322 Social Welfare Policy & Program I 3
Economic and social justice is used as an organizing framework to study the relationship between major social problems and social welfare policy, programs and services. Included are poverty, health and mental-health care, family problems, racism, sexism and other forms of institutionalized oppression. The political aspects of social welfare policy and the legislative process itself are examined in depth. Prerequisites: SoWk 221, 224 or consent of instructor.

SOWK 323 Social Welfare Policy & Program II 4
A critical analysis of social welfare programs and issues of social welfare policy, including philosophical perspectives, the broad issues of organization, cost delivery, impact, effectiveness and alternate strategies. Students develop skills in identifying, evaluating and formulating macro-level approaches to social problems. Prerequisite: SoWk 322 or consent of instructor. Taken concurrently with SoWk 325.

SOWK 325 Social Work Practice Theory I 4
Systems approach to the practice of social work beginning with a model for solving human problems. Emphasizes development of a theoretical base for social work practice and includes a laboratory in which specific behavioral skills are developed through simulation experiences. Prerequisites: SoWk 221, 224. Taken concurrently with SoWk 323.

SOWK 345 Women's Concerns 3
This course covers a wide range of issues that are part of contemporary North American women's lives. The place of women in society is approached from the position of social and economic justice. The course: (a) examines and critiques the U.S. American women's movement as an interpersonal and psychological phenomenon; (b) identifies cultural, religious, racial, social, economic and political processes as they affect women's lives; (c) considers women to be persons of worth and value with the right of self-determination ; and (d) assists in understanding, contextually, women's requests for help and appropriate intervention strategies. Class participation and small group discussions are important components of course learning.

SOWK 350 Human Services:Special Studies 3
An in-depth seminar on a selected field of service, program or policy issue. Particular emphasis is given to concepts of exploitation and social/economic justice. Check the course offering list to see current options.

SOWK 391 Methods of Social Research 3
(Cross-listed from Soc 391) An introduction of the principles and methods of social research in sociology and social work, including the project design, data analysis and interpretation for both quantitative and qualitative research projects. Prerequisites: Soc 200, 210, SoWk 221, 224.

SOWK 409 Field Instruction 10
Integration of knowledge base and the acquisition of social work practice skills through direct practice under a qualified field instructor in a social service agency. Field Instruction must be applied for during the spring of the year preceding enrollment. Usually taken over two semesters; may be taken for 10 credits during the spring semester by approval of program director. Prerequisites: SoWk 323, 325 and consent of program director. Students furnish their own transportation for field placement.

SOWK 410 Social Work Senior Seminar 2
Taken during the second semester of Field Instruction or concurrent with one semester block field placement. A weekly seminar that offers the integration of learnings from all social work and required related courses. The final exam takes the form of a written paper and oral examination through which students demonstrate their integration of learning and skill competencies.

SOWK 425 Social Work Practice Theory II 3
Expansion of learnings from Social Work Practice Theory I and Social Welfare Policy and Program II and application to social work practice with individuals, families and social systems of varying size. This course is taught concurrently with the first semester of field instruction, which provides the opportunity to integrate theory with skill development. Prerequisites: SoWk 323, 325, and admission to the program.