Music

Debra Brubaker, Professor of Music
Christopher Fashun, Assistant Professor of Music
Matthew Hill, Professor of Music
Scott Hochstetler, Associate Professor of Music
Beverly Lapp, Department Chair, Professor of Music
Kathryn Schmidt, Assistant Professor of Music
Solomia Soroka, Associate Professor of Music
Matthias Stegmann, Music Center Recording Specialist, Guitar Instructor

Introduction

The Music department at Goshen College is dedicated to the cultivation of excellence in the areas of musical performance, pedagogy and scholarship. We believe musical expression is a human manifestation of the divine impulse and, as such, serves as a window into the individual soul, as a bridge between human beings and as a means of shared religious experience. The music department offers a major with four possible concentration areas, three minors, two endorsement options and two one-year certificates:

Visit the Music department website at www.goshen.edu/music.
A special resource for music students is the Goshen College Music Center, home to world class Sauder Concert Hall. The Music Center hosts several concert series each year, and the Community School of the Arts, based in the Music Center, offers a wide variety of music instruction and programming to the regional community. See www.gcmusiccenter.org for more information.

Student learning outcomes

Graduates in music will:

  1. Demonstrate growth in musicianship and artistry for excellence in music performance.
  2. Demonstrate increased skills and knowledge for quality scholarship in music.
  3. Develop expertise toward effective pedagogies and leadership in music.
  4. Integrate performance skills, aesthetic understandings and academic work toward music's service as an instrument of peacemaking and the deepening of Christian faith.
  5. Demonstrate preparedness for a vibrant career that includes using the musical arts for a positive contribution to society.

Career and postgraduate opportunities

Music graduates are currently working in public and private schools, colleges and universities, in private teaching, music technology, professional performance, in church music ministry and in music business. Some are also practicing music therapy, for which an undergraduate degree in music education is recommended. Many music graduates have gone on to earn degrees at our nation's most prestigious graduate schools.

Major in music

43-84 credit hours (Core and one concentration area)

Core courses (23 credit hours):

  • Mus 201/202, Music Theory I & II6
  • Mus 201/202-01, Keyboard Theory Labs 1
  • Mus 201/202-02, Aural Skills Labs1
  • Mus 204, Survey of Music Literature 3
  • Mus 301/302, History of Music I & II 6
  • Mus 303, Advanced Music Theory I 3
  • Mus 311, Topics in Music Literature 2
  • Mus 410, Senior Seminar 1
  • Sophomore qualifying recital NC
  • Keyboard proficiency NC
  • Senior recital, project, or lecture recital NC

Generalist concentration (20-21 credit hours)

  • Mus 212, Song Leading 1
  • Mus 304, Advanced Music Theory II 3
  • Applied music 14
  • One music elective from the following list: 2-3
    Mus 208, Introduction to Piano Pedagogy (3)
    Mus 210, Elementary Music Methods (3)
    Mus 308, Vocal Methods and Pedagogy (2)
    Mus 312, Conducting (3)
  • Ensemble participation at least seven semesters NC
  • Pianists only: accompany sophomore recitals or equivalent, as directed by the applied teacher NC

Music education concentration for K-12 certification (61 credit hours)

  • Mus 210, Elementary Music Methods 3
  • Mus 304, Advanced Music Theory II 3
  • Mus 305, String Methods and Materials 2
  • Mus 306, Woodwind Methods and Materials 2
  • Mus 307, Brass Methods and Materials 2
  • Mus 308, Vocal Methods and Pedagogy 2
  • Mus 312, Conducting 3
  • Mus 330, Teaching Secondary School Music 2
  • Applied Music 12
  • Professional education courses (see education department pages for details) 30
  • Ensemble participation at least seven semesters NC
  • Pianists only: accompany sophomore recitals or equivalent as directed by the applied teacher NC

Music and worship concentration (25-26 credit hours)

  • One of the following courses: 3
    Mus 208, Introduction to Piano Pedagogy
    Mus 210, Elementary Music Methods
  • Mus 212, Song Leading 1
  • Mus 312, Conducting 3
  • Mus 409, Internship 1-2
  • Applied music 8
  • Three related courses chosen from the following: 9
    Bibl 301, Hebrew Scriptures
    Engl 203, Introduction to Creative Writing
    Psyc 210 SW, Developmental Psychology
    Rel 205 RW, Religion in America
    Rel 210, Introduction to Youth Ministry
    Rel 320, Christian Faith
    Thea 235, The Power of Story
    Thea 245, Aesthetics
  • Ensemble participation at least six semesters NC
  • Public demonstration of leading chamber ensemble or congregational singing NC
  • Pianists only: accompany sophomore recitals or equivalent, as directed by the applied teacher NC

Piano pedagogy concentration (22 credit hours)

  • Mus 208, Introduction to Piano Pedagogy 3
  • Mus 211, Group Piano Instruction 2
  • Mus 304, Advanced Music Theory II 3
  • Mus 310, Intermediate Piano Pedagogy 2
  • Mus 412, Piano Literature 2
  • Applied music 12
  • At least six semesters of ensemble/accompanying NC
  • Accompany sophomore recitals or equivalent, as directed by the applied teacher NC

Research and performance endorsement options

Research endorsement requirements:

  1. Sophomore qualifying recital (15 min.) or lecture-recital (20 min.) involving live performance and sample of written scholarly work (3,000 words) on a music topic submitted to faculty.
  2. Junior project: a lecture or lecture-recital (30 min.) or a presentation at the student research symposium. Paper must be submitted to faculty for approval one month in advance.
  3. Senior presentation of a scholarly paper (60 min.), which may or may not include performance. A 9-10,000 word paper must be submitted to faculty one month prior to the public presentation.

Performance endorsement requirements:

  1. Sophomore qualifying recital (20-25 min.)
  2. Junior recital (30 min.)
  3. Senior recital (50-60 min.) A permission performance is required one month prior to the public senior recital date.
  4. Specific instrument requirements:
    Pianists - learn at least one full concerto (may serve as junior recital) and accompany at least three sophomore recitals or comparable collaborative performances.
    Violinists - learn at least one full concerto (may serve as junior recital)
    Other instrumentalists - significant sonata repertoire and full concerto or other collaborative chamber project.

Additional requirements

Keyboard proficiency. Keyboard proficiency will require facility in sight-reading, keyboard technique, harmonization, transposition, improvisation and playing by ear. Prior to entering the first semester of music theory (Mus 201), an examination will be given to determine the student's keyboard proficiency level and placement in the keyboard theory labs. Keyboard proficiency exams will be given during final exam days of each semester. In order to pass the keyboard proficiency exam, most students require a sequence of study that begins with the 200-level music theory keyboard skills labs and continues with at least one semester of private applied piano study. Students earning a grade of B or higher in Mus 250 Class Piano automatically meet the requirement. Fulfilling the keyboard proficiency requirement early on in the degree program (by the end of the junior year at the very latest) is strongly recommended.

Departmental recitals. All music majors and minors are expected to perform in the music department weekly recitals as directed by their applied faculty instructor.

Sophomore qualifying recital. All music majors, minors and interdisciplinary majors with a focus in music are required to present 15-20 minutes of music in a public recital by the end of their fourth semester of applied music study. Successful completion of this requirement, as well as acceptable work in other music studies, is a prerequisite for continuing as a major in the department.

Junior recital/project. Junior recitals/projects are required only for students pursuing the research or performance endorsements. See specific requirements under those headings and on the music department Web site.

Senior recital/lecture-recital/project. For those required to perform or present a senior recital or project, a permission performance is required one month prior to the public senior recital/presentation date. All program notes, translations and written documents must be submitted at the time of the permission for review and approval. Senior recitals are not required for music minors, but may be included (NC) if agreed upon by the student and music department adviser.

Ensemble participation. All music majors and minors are required to participate in a core ensemble (chamber choir, orchestra, or chamber orchestra). Participation in non-core ensembles is also encouraged (jazz band, men's chorus, women's world music choir, percussion ensemble, small chamber groups).

Planning guide

First year Goshen Core
Music Theory
Applied music
Survey of Music Literature
Second year Goshen Core
Music Theory (if not taken in first year)
Advanced Theory (if not in third year)
Specialty Course (see previous list)
Applied music
Courses in concentration
Sophomore recital
SST
Third year Goshen Core
Advanced Theory (if not in second year)
Applied music
Courses in concentration
Fourth year Balance of Goshen Core
Balance of major
History of Music
Topics in Music
Senior Seminar
Recital or paper
Fifth year Student teaching in fall for music education majors

Planning and advising notes

Music education students may take any of the following courses whenever offered: Mus 210, Mus 330, Mus 312. Music education students should see the Education department pages for professional education courses required for certification to teach.

Minor in Music

20-21 credit hours

  • Mus 201/202, Music Theory I & II 8
  • Mus 204, Survey of Music Literature 3
  • Mus 212, Song Leading 1
  • Applied music 6
  • Music elective from the following options:2-3
    Mus 208, Introduction to Piano Pedagogy (3)
    Mus 210, Elementary Music Methods (3)
    Mus 301, Music History I (3)
    Mus 302, Music History II (3)
    Mus 303, Advanced Music Theory (3)
    Mus 308, Vocal Methods & Pedagogy (2)
    Mus 311, Topics in Music Literature (2)
    Mus 312, Conducting (3)
    Mus 355, Arts in London (4)
  • Ensemble participation at least six semesters NC
  • Sophomore recital or project (may be given in junior or senior year) NC

Planning and advising note

Students pursuing a minor in music, especially those receiving music scholarships, are strongly encouraged to complete all requirements by the end of their junior year, particularly the 201-202-204 sequence of courses.

Minor in piano pedagogy

22 credit hours

  • Mus 201/202, Music Theory I & II 8
  • Mus 204, Survey of Music Literature 3
  • Mus 208, Introduction to Piano Pedagogy 3
  • Mus 310, Intermediate Piano Pedagogy 2
  • Applied music: Piano 6
  • Ensemble participation at least four semesters NC
  • Sophomore recital or project (may be given in junior or senior year) NC

Minor in music in worship

20-21 credit hours

  • Mus 201/202, Music Theory I & II 8
  • Mus 204, Survey of Music Literature 3
  • Mus 212, Song Leading 1
  • Mus 311, Topics in Music Literature: Church Music 2
  • Applied music 4
  • One of the following courses: 2-3
    Mus 208, Introduction to Piano Pedagogy
    Mus 210, Elementary Music Methods
  • Ensemble participation at least four semesters NC
  • Sophomore recital or project (may be given in junior or senior year) NC

Music courses


MUS 102 Foundations of Music Theory 2
An introduction to the reading and interpretation of musical notation for those with limited experience. The development of basic aural and keyboard skills, along with exposure to musical forms and styles will also be included. Intended as preparation for Mus 201-202 and as an exploratory experience for all aspiring musicians.

MUS 201 Music Theory 3
This course develops skills in analysis and composition to learn melodic, contrapuntal, harmonic, motivic, and formal principles of music towards a stronger theoretical understanding of how music is constructed. Although a variety of styles will be explored and used as examples, course materials focus on the "Common Practice Era", Western music's Baroque (1600-1750) and Classical (1750-1825) periods. The course begins with a review of foundational music theory concepts and moves through triads and seventh chords, melodic embellishments, partwriting in four-voice structure, figured bass, and diatonic harmony. The Keyboard Skills lab develops functional keyboard skills, as well as basic musicianship skills with emphasis on ear playing, reading, harmonizing, transposing, improvising, technique, and repertoire. The Aural Skills lab develops abilities in sight singing using the solfeggi system, rhythm reading, dictation, and improvisation. Each lab meets once per week.

MUS 202 Music Theory 3
A continuation of Mus 201, this course continues the study of Western music theory via analysis and composition activities. Concepts studied include phrase structure, linear dominant chords, predominant and linear harmonic functions, melodic figuration and dissonance, deeper exploration of diatonic harmonies, the leading-tone and other seventh chords, harmonic sequences, secondary dominants, and tonicization/modulation. Participation in the keyboard and aural-skills labs is required (.5 credit hours each). Prerequisite: Mus 201. The Keyboard Skills lab develops functional keyboard skills, as well as basic musicianship skills with emphasis on ear playing, reading, harmonizing, transposing, improvising, technique, and repertoire. The Aural Skills lab develops abilities in sight singing using the solfeggi system, rhythm reading, dictation, and improvisation. Each lab meets once per week.

MUS 203 What is Music? 3
Explores the many answers to this question in different historical and cultural contexts. Considers the relationship of music to the divine or transcendent and also issues related to performance, criticism, and interpretation. An Artistic World Perspectives course in the Goshen Core.

MUS 204 Survey of Music Literature 3
Designed to follow a year of music theory and precede the study of music history, this course presents an introduction to the basic style periods in Western music literature and acquaints the student with the main forms, composers and masterworks of those epochs.

MUS 206 Music Theater:Opera to Musical 3
This course examines examples of musical theater, from Monteverdi's Orfeo to the musical adaptation of Victor Hugo's Les Miserables. The chief emphasis will be to better understand how ideas, emotions, and themes within an opera or musical also depict social, cultural, and theological perspectives of a given historical epoch. Conversely, music theater can also affect the social, cultural, and theological imagination of its audience. An Artistic World course in the Goshen Core.

MUS 208 Introduction to Piano Pedagogy 3
This introductory course in the piano pedagogy sequence focuses on the beginning student and on the materials and teaching techniques most effective for this level of instruction. The course includes weekly lecture-discussion sessions, observation of class and private instruction, and the supervised teaching of weekly private lessons.

MUS 209 Music Field Experience 1 (1-3)
On-campus internships supervised by a professor. May include arts administration, audio recording technology, church music, private teaching or other fields.

MUS 210 Elementary Music Methods 3
This course is designed for teaching general music at the elementary level for elementary and music education majors. The course will introduce students to traditional and current methodologies of classroom music instruction. Emphasis on lesson planning, scope and sequence of a K-5 music program, and exploration of diverse repertoire utilizing singing and instruments.

MUS 211 Group Piano Instruction 2
This course will provide students with an introduction to the pedagogy of group piano instruction for older students. We will examine a four-semester curriculum that encompasses elementary to intermediary piano levels. The pedagogical approach will examine conceptual learning and problem solving in relation to the following: ear playing, reading, transposition, harmonization, improvisation, technique and repertoire. Primary aims of study: Learning the applied skills such as ear playing, harmonization and transposition and being able to utilize these materials to convey important musical concepts in a classroom situation; gaining a greater appreciation, through research, of the academic literature concerning group piano instruction; surveying several college-level class piano texts.

MUS 212 Song Leading 1
An introductory course using Hymnal: A Worship Book as a primary text. Emphasis will be placed on learning how to be a confident song leader. Attention will also be given to incorporating a variety of quality worship music in a worship setting. No prerequisite. Nonmajors are welcome.

MUS 240 Class Voice 2
Breathing, diction and other beginning techniques of voice production learned through exercise and song. Musical and dramatic interpretation studied within a singing performance setting. This course serves as a prerequisite for private applied voice study for students without previous vocal instruction. Exceptions are determined by the voice faculty.

MUS 250 Class Piano 2
A course of study for the beginning adult pianist, this course will meet in the Yamaha Clavinova lab. Skill development in ear playing, reading, transposition, harmonization, improvisation, technique and repertoire. Students earning a grade of B or higher in this course will have automatically met their piano proficiency requirement.

MUS 260 Chamber Music 1
Designed as an avenue to explore the intricacies of small ensemble playing. A pre-approved chamber group receives chamber coaching and general supervision with a music professor. The class is open to vocalists and instrumentalists.

MUS 261 Jazz Ensemble 0 (0-1)
Lavender Jazz is Goshen College's jazz ensemble. The group plays classic jazz standards and styles, such as swing, blues, waltz, mambo, cha cha and funk. Lavender Jazz performs one concert per semester in Sauder Concert Hall and performs occasionally off-campus for community events like the city of Goshen October First Friday. Other performance opportunities for the members of Lavender Jazz include performing in a jazz combo recital in Reith Recital Hall once per semester. Both the jazz ensemble and jazz combos are frequently asked to perform for both community and private events.

MUS 262 Opera Workshop 0 (0-1)
Opera Workshop is open to music majors and nonmajors by audition, and may be taken with or without credit. Fully staged, complete productions of operas and musicals alternate with productions of programs presenting opera, operetta, or musical thater scenes. Students are taught stage movement, character development, and solo/ensemble singing that enhances their ability to perform onstage.

MUS 263 All-Campus Band 0 (0-1)
All-Campus Band

MUS 265 Composition 2
Composition

MUS 269 Percussion 2
Percussion

MUS 270 Cello 2
Cello

MUS 271 Organ 2
Organ

MUS 272 Piano 2
Piano

MUS 273 Viola 2
Viola

MUS 274 Violin 2
Violin

MUS 275 Voice 2
Voice.

MUS 277 Flute 2
Flute

MUS 278 Bassoon 2
Bassoon

MUS 279 Oboe 2
Oboe

MUS 281 French Horn 2
French Horn

MUS 282 Trumpet 2
Trumpet

MUS 283 Clarinet 2
Clarinet

MUS 284 String Bass 2
String Bass

MUS 286 Guitar 2
Guitar

MUS 287 Saxophone 2
Saxophone

MUS 288 Harpsichord 2
Harpsichord

MUS 292 Symphony Orchestra 0 (0-1)
The Goshen College Symphony Orchestra presents concerts of major orchestral works from the Baroque to contemporary periods of music each semester. In addition, it collaborates with the choirs for various performances and student winners of the annual Concerto-Aria competition. The orchestra also performs in the department's annual Festival of Carols program and hosts world-renowned guest soloists and composers. The orchestra is open to all students by audition, regardless of major.

MUS 293 Men's Chorus 0 (0-1)
The Goshen College Men's Chorus is an auditioned group of 35-55 men representing a wide variety of academic majors. The Men's Chorus performs music from all genres and time periods with special emphasis on sacred a cappella literature. The men perform in numerous on-campus concerts and occasional off-campus concerts each year, as well as on periodic tours. In addition to singing male chorus repertoire, they regularly combine in concert with the Women's World Music Choir and the Symphony Orchestra to present standard SATB literature and choral/orchestral literature.

MUS 294 Women's World Music Choir 0 (0-1)
The Goshen College Women's World Music Choir is an auditioned group of 55-70 women representing a wide variety of academic majors. Its focus is the authentic performance of music from many cultures and countries. The choir performs in numerous on-campus and off-campus concerts each year, and tours routinely. In addition to singing world music repertoire, the Women's Choir regularly combines in concert with the Men's Chorus and Symphonic Orchestra to present standard SATB literature and choral/orchestral literature.

MUS 295 Harp 2
Harp

MUS 296 Trombone 2
Trombone

MUS 297 Tuba/Euphonium 2
Tuba/Euphonium

MUS 301 History of Music 3
This survey of Western Music from antiquity through the death of J.S. Bach will focus on the following desired outcomes: 1) Develop a deeper understanding for the musical styles, genres, and composers from antiquity through the Baroque in Western music history, 2) To understand the most significant historical, philosophical, and artistic influences on music from the time of antiquity through the death of J.S. Bach, and 3) To intellectually grasp the major principles and models for musical expression in the above time periods. Prerequisite: Mus 201-202, 204 or permission of instructor.

MUS 302 History of Music 3
This survey of Western Music from early classicism through the 21th century will focus on the following desired outcomes: 1) To develop a deeper understanding for the musical styles, genres, and composers from the beginnings of classicism through the present, 2) To understand the most significant historical, philosophical, and artistic influences on music from the classicism of the 18th century to the present, and 3) To intellectually grasp the major principles and models for musical expression in the above time periods. Note: Students should make every attempt to take MUS 301 before 302 as several important concepts carry over from the earlier time periods into those discussed in MUS 302. Prerequisite: Mus 201-202, 204 or permission of instructor.

MUS 303 Advanced Music Theory 3
Introduction to chromatic harmony through the study of hierarchy of chords and modulation procedures of the Classical period. Analysis of complex forms of the Baroque and the Classical periods. Formal and harmonic studies of works by Bach, Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. Prerequisites: Mus 201-202, 204, or permission of instructor.

MUS 304 Advanced Music Theory 3
Study of chromatic harmony through altered chords and modulation procedures of the late 18th and 19th centuries. Formal and harmonic analysis of works from the Romantic period. Introduction of the atonal theory. Studies of 20th century works and compositional techniques therein. Continuation of formal analysis of atonal works. Prerequisites: Mus 303.

MUS 305 String Methods & Materials 2
String Methods is designed for music education majors and students who are interested in learning how to play and teach stringed instruments. Students will develop proficient playing techniques in violin, viola, cello, and double bass that will allow them to adequately provide instruction to students in grades 5-12. There is a focus on pedagogical approaches and strategies for each instrument that include both individual and large-ensemble instruction. The course will provide students with specific materials and resources (method books, etude books, repertoire, etc.) appropriate for use with students in grades 5-12.

MUS 306 Woodwind Methods & Materials 2
Woodwind Methods is designed for music education majors and students who are interested in learning how to play and teach woodwind instruments. Students will develop proficient playing techniques in flute, oboe, bassoon, clarinet, and saxophone that will allow them to adequately provide instruction to students in grades 5-12. There is a focus on pedagogical approaches and strategies for each instrument that include both individual and large-ensemble instruction. The course will provide students with specific materials and resources (method books, etude books, repertoire, etc.) appropriate for use with students in grades 5-12.

MUS 307 Brass Methods & Materials 2
Brass Methods is designed for music education majors and students who are interested in learning how to play and teach brass instruments. Students will develop proficient playing techniques in trumpet, horn, trombone, euphonium, and tuba that will allow them to adequately provide instruction to students in grades 5-12. There is a focus on pedagogical approaches and strategies for each instrument that include both individual and large-ensemble instruction. The course will provide students with specific materials and resources (method books, etude books, repertoire, etc.) appropriate for use with students in grades 5-12.

MUS 308 Vocal Methods & Pedagogy 2
Required of all music-education majors and strongly recommended for all students with a voice concentration. Study of basic concepts of singing in a class setting with the goal of assisting students in becoming effective teachers of singing. Emphases will include review of basic singing technique, vocal physiology, drill in diagnosis and correction of vocal problems, diction and vocalizing for desired results. There will be a fieldwork dimension to this class.

MUS 310 Intermediate Piano Pedagogy 2
With special emphasis on the intermediate level student, this course focuses on the integration of theory, skills and repertoire; the teaching of transfer students; adolescent psychology and piano study; and a survey of intermediate materials.

MUS 311 Topics in Music Literature 2
The study of a major composer, genre or style. Prerequisites: Mus 201-202 and Mus 204 or consent permission of the instructor.

MUS 312 Conducting 3
Principles of conducting theory and practice. Course begins with basic technique and progresses to score preparation and rehearsal planning for large ensembles. Students are encouraged, though not required, to take Mus 212 prior to Mus 312.

MUS 330 Teaching Secondary School Music 2
This course deals with the practical strategies needed to build a successful music program at the secondary level (grades 6-12). Topics studied will include: developing high quality repertoire including multicultural elements, understanding the male changing voice, program structure, student rapport and classroom management, concert programming, marketing and recruiting, assessment strategies, and teaching musical literacy. A field component provides hand-on experience to develop important teaching skills prior to student teaching.

MUS 340 Audio Production 2
An introduction to the recording studio presenting its function in commercial music production. Areas include basic electronics, studio setup and engineering fundamentals. Lecture/lab.

MUS 355 Arts in London 4
(Cross-listed from Thea 355) A May term class that encompasses theater, art and music study and experiences in London, England. Class activities include morning lectures, visits to art galleries, attending music and theater performances, and day trips to Coventry, Stratford-upon-Avon, Salisbury and other locations. Daily writing assignments and a major project required. Offered in alternate years. Extra cost.

MUS 360 Chamber Music 1
Designed as an avenue to explore the intricacies of small ensemble playing. Approved chamber groups of two to eight students work with the instructor on rehearsal techniques and music decision making in a master-class setting. The class meets weekly and is open to all vocalists and instrumentalists.

MUS 362 Opera Workshop 1
Opera Workshop is open to music majors, minors, and nonmajors by audition, and may be taken with or without credit. Fully staged, complete productions of operas and musicals alternate with productions of programs presenting opera, operetta, or musical theater scenes. Students are taught stage movement, character development, and solo/ensemble singing that enhances their ability to perform onstage.

MUS 365 Composition 2
Prerequisite: Mus 265

MUS 369 Percussion 2
Prerequisite: Mus 269

MUS 370 Cello 2
Prerequisite: Mus 270

MUS 371 Organ 2
Prerequisite: Mus 271

MUS 372 Piano 2
Prerequisite: Mus 272

MUS 373 Viola 2
Prerequisite: Mus 273

MUS 374 Violin 2
Prerequisite: Mus 274

MUS 375 Voice 2
Prerequisite: Mus 275

MUS 377 Flute 2
Prerequisite: Mus 277

MUS 378 Bassoon 2
Prerequisite: Mus 278

MUS 379 Oboe 2
Prerequisite: Mus 279

MUS 381 French Horn 2
Prerequisite: Mus 281

MUS 382 Trumpet 2
Prerequisite: Mus 282

MUS 383 Clarinet 2
Prerequisite: Mus 283

MUS 384 String Bass 2
Prerequisite: Mus 284

MUS 386 Guitar 2
Prerequisite: Mus 286

MUS 387 Saxophone 2
Prerequisite: Mus 287

MUS 388 Harpsichord 2
Prerequisite: Mus 288

MUS 390 Chamber Choir 0 (0-1)
The Goshen College Chamber Choir is the elite mixed choir on campus, drawing its members from both the Men's Chorus and the Women's World Music Choir. An auditioned group of 25-45 first-years through seniors, the Chamber Choir performs the best in choral literature from the Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, and Modern periods. The Chamber Choir performs at numerous on-campus and occasional off-campus concerts each year, as well as on periodic tours. Corequisite: Mus 293 or 294.

MUS 395 Harp 2
Prerequisite: Mus 295

MUS 396 Trombone 2
Prerequisite: Mus 296

MUS 397 Tuba/Euphonium 2
Prerequisite: Mus 297

MUS 400 Special Projects in Music 1
May be elected for additional individual work in music theory, analysis, music history, conducting, music recording or music technology. May be repeated.

MUS 409 Music Internship 3 (1-3)
Designed to give students practical experience in music-related fields such as arts administration, music business, audio recording technology, church music and music therapy. Internships are individually arranged with the work supervisor and faculty adviser.

MUS 410 Senior Seminar 1
Weekly meetings of music majors and faculty to discuss vocational, curricular and ethical/spiritual topics.

MUS 412 Piano Literature 2
A functional knowledge of piano literature is essential for all pianists and teachers. This course will present an historical survey of piano literature from J.S. Bach to the present day focusing on stylistic elements pertinent to particular composers. Special emphasis will be given to works that may be best suited for advanced students, both high school and at the college undergraduate level.