Acadenics

 

Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures (MCLL)

Amanda Flickinger, Assistant Professor of American Sign Language
Colleen Geier, Program Director and Assistant Professor of ASL Interpreting
Paul Keim, Professor of Bible & Religion and Foreign Language
Dean Rhodes, Department Chair, Associate Professor of Spanish
Maria Sanchez Schirch, Assistant Professor of Spanish
Nayo Ulloa, Adjunct Professor of Spanish

Introduction

The MCLL department offers majors in Spanish and American Sign Language Interpreting, and minors in Spanish and American Sign Languge. In addition, Spanish offers a secondary education teaching option. The mission of MCLL is to foster in our students intercultural openness with the ability to function effectively with people of other world views as well as to develop in our students the ability to communicate in a variety of language systems.

Two semesters of French are offered in alternating years to prepare students for SST in Senegal, West Africa. In addition, one semester courses are offered prior to the following SST units: Khmer (Cambodia), Mandarin Chinese (China), and Swahili (Tanzania), typically offered the semester just prior to the Study Service Term. Visit the modern and classical languages and literature department website at goshen/edu/mcll and the American Sign Language website at goshen.edu/mcll/asl.

Major in American Sign Language interpreting

61 credit hours

  • ASL 101-102, Elementary ASL I & II 8
  • ASL 104, North American Deaf Culture 3
  • ASL 201-202, Intermediate ASL I & II 8
  • ASL 205, Advanced Fingerspelling and Numbers 2
  • ASL 210, Introduction to Interpreting3
  • ASL 301-302, Interpreting I & II 8
  • ASL 305, Linguistics of ASL 3
  • ASL 306, ASL Literature 3
  • ASL 401, Interpreting III 4
  • ASL 405, Transliterating3
  • ASL 407, Topics in Interpreting3
  • ASL 409, Interpreting Internship 12
  • ASL 410, Senior Seminar 1

Student learning outcomes

Graduates in ASL interpreting will:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of multicultural approaches to the work of interpreting and demonstrate effective bilingual and bicultural practice within their work.
  2. Apply professional standards, practices, and ethics to their work.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to evaluate an interpreting situation, choose the appropriate language or communication method, manage the environment, and work with clients and team interpreters.
  4. Demonstrate an advanced level of receptive and expressive proficiency in both English and American Sign Language.
  5. Effectively interpret and transliterate in dialogic one-on-one and small group settings with a variety of participants.
  6. Demonstrate skills necessary for interpreting or transliterating in entry level employment settings: a portfolio that includes a resume, video example, and documentation of 100 hours of supervised work experience.
  7. Document attendance at a minimum of six workshops in a portfolio for ongoing professional development.

Planning guide

First year Goshen Core
Elementary American Sign Language I and II
North American Deaf Culture
Second year Goshen Core
Intermediate American Sign Language I and II
Introduction to Interpreting
Other courses in major
Recommended electives
Third year

SST (recommended in fall to Peru)
Goshen Core
Interpreting I and II
Courses in major
Recommended electives

Fourth year Balance of Goshen Core
Interpreting III
Transliteraing
Topics in interpreting
Balance of major courses
Interpreting Internship
Senior Integrating Seminar

Planning and advising notes

Students majoring in American Sign Language are required to earn a grade of C or above in each course. Courses may be repeated only once to attempt a higher grade.

Recommended elective courses for ASL interpreting majors include: Bus 217, Personal Finance; Comm 206, Communication Across Cultures; Engl 310, Introduction to Linguistics; Engl 315, The English Language; Soc 200, Principles of Sociology; Soc 230, Ethnography and Culture; Soc 334, Race, Class and Ethnic Relations; and Thea 215, The Power of Story.

Minor in American Sign Language

21 credit hours

  • ASL 101-102, Elementary ASL I & II 8
  • ASL 104, North American Deaf Culture 3
  • ASL 201-202, Intermediate ASL I & II 8
  • ASL 205, Advanced Fingerspelling and Numbers 2

Major in Spanish

37-40 credit hours

  • Spanish courses 202 level and higher (3 credit hours may be French or German) 21
  • Span 300, Hispanic Literature 3
  • MCLL 410, Senior Seminar 1
  • Related courses selected from the following: 12
    Art 241-242, History of Art I, II
    Art 343, Contemporary Art History
    Engl 201, World Literature
    Engl 310, Introduction to Linguistics
    Engl 320, Methods of TESOL
    Hist 344, Latin American History
    PoSc 318, Latin American Politics
    MCLL 375, Topics
    Mus 301-302, History of Music I & II
    Soc 336, Latin American Societies and Cultures
    Thea 245, Aesthetics
    Thea 388, Themes in Drama
  • Junior year abroad (or approved alternate) NC
  • Internship (may be met by extended residence in Spanish-speaking country) 0-3

Student learning outcomes

Graduates in Spanish will:

  1. Engage in Spanish language conversations, provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions.
  2. Understand and interpret written and spoken Spanish on a variety of topics.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between the practices and perspectives of Spanish speaking cultures.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of the nature of language through comparisons of Spanish and English (or another language).
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of the concept of culture through comparisons of Spanish speaking cultures and their own.
  6. Use Spanish both within and beyond the school setting, including the Spanish speaking community in Goshen.
  7. Show evidence of becoming life-long learners by using the language for personal enjoyment, enrichment, and acquiring a larger global perspective.

Planning guide

First year Goshen Core
Level 202 or higher
Second language (or second year)
Second year Goshen Core
Advanced language courses
Second language
SST (recommended)
Third year Junior Year Abroad (advanced language and related courses)
Fourth year Balance of Goshen Core
Balance of major and related courses
Hispanic Literature
Senior Integrating Seminar

Planning and advising notes

While most Spanish majors begin to study Spanish in high school, it is possible to complete the major successfully if the student begins Spanish study at Goshen College and plans carefully. The requirement of two semesters living and studying abroad, usually completed during the student's junior year, can be met by one of the following:
1) Spend one semester in a Goshen College SST location (Peru or Nicaragua) and the other semester in an approved study abroad program. These two semesters do not necessarily need to be taken consecutively.
2) Spend two consecutive semesters in the same country with an approved study abroad program.
While SST is not required to complete the major, it is highly recommended. The 12 hour requirement of upper level related coursework for the Spanish major is normally completed during the study semester in one of the following approved study abroad programs:

  • BCA - Bridge/Connect/Act
  • CIEE - Center for Intercultural Education and Exchange
  • CEA - Cultural Experiences Abroad

Teacher education certification requirements

Teacher certification is available for grades 5-12 in two related areas. Courses needed in addition to the Spanish major core requirements are as follows:
Spanish education - Engl 310, Engl 320, at least 33 credit hours of Spanish language (up to 12 credit hours for level 101-201 may be earned by exam).
Bilingual/bicultural education – Comm 206, Engl 310, Engl 315, Engl 319, Engl 320, Engl 325, Educ 303, Educ 307, Educ 344, Educ 406

Also 30 credits of education courses, including a semester of student teaching. The first education course, Educ 201, should be taken in May term of the first year or fall of the sophomore year. See the education department pages and the Teacher Education Handbook for more details about requirements.

Minor in Spanish

12 credit hours

  • Spanish courses 202 level and higher 12
  • One semester of study abroad in a Spanish-speaking country (may be SST) NC

American Sign Language courses


ASL 101 Elementary American Sign Language I 4
An introduction to American Sign Language and the Deaf community; focuses on frequently used signs, basic rules of grammar, nonmanual aspects of American Sign Language and some cultural features of the Deaf community.

ASL 102 Elementary American Sign Lang II 4
Emphasizes further development of receptive and expressive skills, vocabulary building and grammatical structures. Introduction to language forms used in American Sign Language poetry and theater. Prerequisite: ASL 101 or consent of instructor.

ASL 103 Elementary American Sign Lang III 4
Emphasis on basic communication skills in the target language and culture. Normally offered only on SST. Prerequisite ASL 102 or equivalent.

ASL 104 North American Deaf Culture 3
Explores the American Deaf community, examining the educational, sociological and cultural features which shape this group of people.

ASL 201 Intermediate American Sign Lang I 4
Continues development of expressive and receptive language skills through student-led discussions and prepared reports on topics related to the Deaf community. Prerequisite: ASL 102 or consent of instructor.

ASL 202 Intermediate American Sign Lang II 4
Develops further expressive and receptive language skills. Prerequisite: ASL 201 or consent of instructor.

ASL 203 Intermediate American Sign Lang III 4
Continuation of grammar practice with emphasis on ASL practice. Normally offered only on SST. Prerequisite:ASL 201 or equivalent.

ASL 205 Advanced Fingerspelling & Numbering 2
Concentrated instruction and practice in expressive and receptive fingerspelling and the complex numbering system of ASL. Prerequisite: ASL 201 or consent of instructor.

ASL 210 Introduction to Interpreting 3
This course will allow students to explore the basic theories, principles and practices of the interpreting profession. Areas of study will include the history and ethics of the profession, national and local organizations as well as the role and responsibilities of the professional interpreter. Cognitive models of interpreting will be introduced and used to analyze texts in preparation for ASL 301 Interpreting I. Prerequisite: ASL 102 or consent of professor.

ASL 300 Gallaudette Term 14
Gallaudette Term

ASL 301 Interpreting I 4
Introduces theory and skills of the interpreting process, presenting both consecutive and simultaneous methods. Prerequisite: All 200-level ASL courses or consent of instructor.

ASL 302 Interpreting II 4
Introduces spontaneous ASL/English interpreting and provides extensive practice utilizing videotapes and audiotapes. Continuation of interpreting practice using recorded materials as well as out-of-class interpreting opportunities. Prerequisite: ASL 301 or consent of instructor.

ASL 305 Linguistics of American Sign Lang 3
Investigates the major grammar rules of American Sign Language. Studies specific aspects of phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics. Prerequisite: ASL 201.

ASL 306 American Sign Language Literature 3
Focuses on various genres of literature by and about Deaf people. Concentrates on Deaf characters and the influences Deaf culture and Deaf history have on literary works. Prerequisite: All 200-level ASL courses or consent of instructor.

ASL 401 Interpreting III 4
Continues the development of interpreting skills through in-class practice and participating in out-of-class interpreting opportunities. Prerequisite: All 300-level ASL courses or consent of instructor.

ASL 405 Transliterating 3
This course focuses on transferring information from spoken or written English into Conceptually Accurate Signed English (CASE) and from signed English into spoken English. Students will practice transliterating skills through various planned and unplanned situations. Issues related to educational interpreting will also be discussed.

ASL 407 Topics in Interpreting 3
Practical and ethical issues in interpreting. Topics will include decision-making, assignment assessment, managing the environment, state licensure requirements, national certification. Students are required to take the written portion of the RID certification examination. Prerequisite: All 300-level ASL courses or consent of instructor.

ASL 409 Interpreting Internship 12
Supervised interpreting experiences through placement in various community settings. Course offered the first 12 weeks of spring semester of the senior year. Prerequisite: ASL 401, 405, and 407.

ASL 410 Senior Seminar 1
Students reflect on ethical dilemmas, problems or conflicts encountered during their 12-week internship (ASL 409) with the goal of learning and growing from the collective discussion and experiences. In addition, students will set goals for themselves related to career, vocation and job procurement and create tools to assist in achieving their goals following graduation. Prerequisite: ASL 401, 405, 407, and 409.

Spanish courses


SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish I 4
Basic skills in understanding, speaking, reading and writing Spanish for beginners; class work includes collaborative learning.

SPAN 102 Elementary Spanish II 4
Basic skills in understanding, speaking, reading and writing Spanish for beginners; class work includes collaborative learning. Prerequisite: Span 101 or equivalent on placement test.

SPAN 103 Elementary Spanish III 4
Emphasis on basic communication skills in the target language and culture. Normally offered only on SST. Prerequisite: Span 102 or equivalent.

SPAN 199 Intro Conv Spanish 2
Intro to Basic Conversational Spanish

SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I 3
A review of grammar and intensive oral practice. Prerequisite: Span 102 or equivalent.

SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II 3
Reading and discussion of short story, drama and topics in Spanish culture. Major emphasis on improving reading, writing and conversational skills. Prerequisite: Span 201 or equivalent.

SPAN 203 Intermediate Spanish III 4
Continuation of grammar practice with emphasis on spoken Spanish. Normally offered only on SST. Prerequisite: Span 201 or equivalent.

SPAN 205 Spanish Conversation & Culture 3
Extensive practice in spoken Spanish. Topics related to life in Spanish-speaking countries. Course especially designed to meet interests of returned SST students. Prerequisite: Span 201 or equivalent.

SPAN 300 Hispanic Literature 3
Taught in Spanish. This course offers an overview of current and classical literature from Spain, Latin America, the Caribbean, and the Spanish-speaking world of North America. Themes, texts, and genres will vary from year to year. Required for Spanish majors; appropriate for returning SST students, CITL students, and others who speak Spanish and want to deepen their knowledge of Hispanic literature. Prerequisite: Span 201.

SPAN 301 Introduction to Spanish Literature 3
A survey of the currents in Peninsular literature. Beginnings through Golden-Age writers. Prerequisite: Span 201.

SPAN 302 Introduction to Spanish Literature 3
A survey of the currents in Peninsular literature. Late-19th and 20th-century writers. Prerequisite: Span 201.

SPAN 303 Spanish Composition I 3
A thorough review of Spanish grammar with exercises in composition. Prerequisite: Span 201.

SPAN 304 Spanish Composition II 3
A thorough review of Spanish grammar with exercises in composition. Prerequisite: Span 201.

SPAN 305 Culture of Hispanic World 3
Course focuses on culture, history, literature and music of the Hispanic world, with particular emphasis on Spanish-speaking SST locations. Comprehensive experience in written and spoken Spanish. Prerequisite: Span 201.

SPAN 309 Spanish-American Novel 3
A study of selected 20th-century Spanish-American novels representing various types emerging from the Spanish-American scene. Prerequisite: Span 201.

SPAN 322 Spanish-American Literature 3
A study of Spanish-American literature from 1880 to present time with special emphasis on the novels, the essay and the short story. Prerequisite: Span 201.

SPAN 349 Hispanic Short Stories 3
Presents Hispanic literature through short stories representative of the Hispanic world, originating in Spain, Latin America, United States and Canada, and integrating Spanish grammar and culture. Students read stories; review vocabulary and grammatical structures; study authors' lives and the historical context of the stories; and discuss cultural elements. Prerequisite: Span 201.

SPAN 350 Hispanic Film Studies 3
Presents Hispanic culture, conversation and grammar using films in Spanish. Prior to viewing, historical and cultural contexts, literary movements and influences of the era are discussed. Shows representative films, followed by activities which include written assignments, small-group presentations and discussions. Draws comparisons between books and the films based on them; encourages students to use vocabulary and grammar structures used in the films. Prerequisite: Span 201.

SPAN 400 Special Projects 1 (1-4)
Projects vary from studies in literature to advanced practice of language skills. Reserved for Spanish majors and minors

French courses


FREN 101 Elementary French I 4
Basic skills in understanding, speaking, reading and writing French for beginners.

FREN 102 Elementary French II 4
Basic skills in understanding, speaking, reading and writing French for beginners. Prerequisite: Fren 101 or equivalent on placement test.

FREN 103 Elementary French III 4
Emphasis on basic communication skills in the target language and culture. Normally offered only on SST. Prerequisite: Fren 102 or equivalent.

FREN 201 Intermediate French I 4
Grammar review with reading and discussion French. Normally offered only on SST. Prerequisite: Fren 102 or equivalent.

FREN 202 Intermediate French II 4
Reading and discussion of prose, poetry and drama. Grammar review, oral and written practice. Normally offered only on SST. Prerequisite: Fren 201 or equivalent.

FREN 203 Intermediate French III 4
Emphasis on conversational French. Normally offered only on SST. Prerequisite: Fren 201 or equivalent.

MCLL courses


MCLL 120 Khmer I 4
Offered in the term prior to Cambodia Study Service Term.

MCLL 140 Elementary Swahili I 4
Offered in the term prior to Tanzania Study Service Term.

MCLL 150 Chinese I 4
Offered in the term prior to China Study Service Term.

MCLL 375 Topics: 3
Study on a selected topic in Modern and Classical Languages and Literatures. Intended to accommodate student interest and/or faculty expertise. Topics may vary from year to year.

MCLL 400 Special Projects 3
Special Projects:

MCLL 409 Language Internship 3 (1-4)
Required of all departmental majors. Requirement usually fulfilled in extensive residence or study abroad in the language of the major, internship abroad or student teaching. Majors may also propose projects.

MCLL 410 Senior Integrating Seminar 1
Majors and faculty meet regularly for an exchange of views on such topics as vocations in foreign language and other issues related to a life-long study of language, culture, and literature in a diverse and multi-lingual global community. Involves the final assembly of a portfolio in the language of the student's major, as well as field excursions to culturally diverse communities in the area. Independent projects in research or teaching.