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HOUSE DESIGN 
SYLLABUS
Art 316, Fall Semester, 1999 
Marvin Bartel, instructor 
Housing design is complex and important. A house must be functional, but at the same time it can not keep from also being the loudest visual and aesthetic statement made by most people. A house is a philosophical statement involving the largest and most public material asset owned (or leased) by most people. As such it speaks volumes about the implicit values of the designer, builder, developer, realtor, city planner, owner, and/or renter. Many issues are decided in designing and/or selecting a house. These decisions are based on explicitly stated or assumed implicit values. Decisions are ultimately based on the opinion about what is most important in a particular circumstance. Often decisions are not very rational, and even people who live in extremely well designed houses can identify obvious shortcomings once they have used the house for a few years. Frank Lloyd Wright's best designs had seriously leaky roofs. In spite of this, many consider him this countries greatest architect, not because the roof leaked, but because his designs made strong statements about his beliefs.


Major Learning Goals                                   to top of page
  1. Identify and clarify the issues around the decision making criteria in house design. Houses work and talk? What makes it function well and what makes it say the right things? What factors help a house correctly reflect the values of its designer and owner?
  2. Develop your abilities to design creative, expressive, appropriate, and functional houses that meet the criteria you decide is most important. This should take the form of inspired problem solving. Where do top designers and architects go for their best inspiration? How does the designer's values and tastes effect the outcome?
  3. Gain skills. Acquire significant, usable (possibly marketable) practiced skills in computer assisted drafting and visual presentation of house designs.
Types of Assignments
  1. Reading reported, discussed, and/or tested. Assigned from text, libraries, and other materials.
  2. Experiential work such as: sketches, drawings, photographing, diagramming, cutouts, computer aided drafting skills, and model making. 
  3. Assignments to record, journal, and respond to field trips and other activities of the course. Use writing and sketching.
  4. Creative planning of two homes. Possibilities include remodeling jobs, vacation houses, condominiums, low income housing, and others tailored to individual proposals.
  5. Web sites to study for this class.
Specific Assignments (links to be added soon here)


Class Attendance                            to top of page

Class sessions are considered the primary contact time with the instructor. In many cases, class sessions will be the only opportunities to get and process the information and skills needed to master the materials in this course. There are no automatically excused class cuts allowed. Failure to attend every class session results in a lowered grade unless the missed class is for reasons beyond the control of the student, and the instructor approves the excuse. Any work missed, even because of an excused absence, must be made up. 

Meet at 12:00 Tuesday and Thursday for double periods. Classes are used for instruction, discussions, field trips, and for time to develop skills and work on drawings. 


Out of Class Work Time

The average time spent out of class should bring the total of in and out of class time to approximately 9 hours per week. 


Grading
What is assessed? 
  1. Creativity. Are you willing to experiment, research, and risk new ideas?
  2. Aesthetics. Are learning and using design principles to produce unity, theme, interest, and so on?
  3. Knowledge of the field. Are you willing to read, observe, process, learn about and apply design theory for houses? 
How are the above measured? 
  1. Quality of assignments (skill development and growth in rendering, drafting, progress on CAD). Are you willing to take time to practice and prefect you skills?
  2. Journals (writing and sketching) to give evidence of thoughtful reflection and consideration of the pros and cons of several options in every situation.
  3. Class reports, participation and attendance.
  4. Tests. Both skills and knowledge are tested - possibly even creativity.                                    to top of page
This is the Instructor's House

Marvin Bartel, the instructor, has a masters and doctorate degree in art education, has studied design and drafting, and has designed original houses built in Goshen, Indiana, in Illinois, and in Kansas. He serves on the Campus Space Planning Committee which deals with aesthetic concerns and campus planning. He has done design and drafting work for several campus renovation projects including Ad28, Multicultural Affairs in Kulp, the Publications Hub, the Degree Completion classroom in Newcommer, as well as numerous others which have not been constructed. 


 |   Drafting and Design Course Home   |  House Design Syllabus
Design Ethics   |  Drafting and Design Syllabus   |   Assignments 
|   Tests   |   Prices of materials   |  Soapdish Assignment  |  Journaling  | 
| Design concepts & Drafting Standards  |  Group Grading   |   Websites to see
 |   Time Saving Acad Hints  |  Answers to Questions  |  The Secret Purpose of Craft   |
  |   Goshen College Art Department  |   Bartelart.com   |   Prices of Materials   |
   |  Marvin Bartel Courses  |    Marvin Bartel Home   |  Bartel Artwork    |

© Marvin Bartel, all rights reserved 
For permission to copy or publish, e-mail: marvinpb@goshen.edu 
Goshen College students may print a copy for thier own use. 

page updated 10-1999