Art Rubric for Assessment of the Discussion & Writing on
Art History, Aesthetics and Art Criticism - an Assessment Form
Category
Person evaluated _____________
Your name __________________
Description
Check & comment here
Good
Average
Needs work
Growth 

How does student now compare with earlier lessons?

In knowledge and vocabulary? . . .
In awareness and perception? Noticing? . . .
In interest, involvement, and attitude?  . . .
In spontaneous comments about art topics?  . . .
Creativity Speculates about meaning and feeling of work. Takes risks.  Mentions alternatives. . . .
How original and innovative are comments, questions, and answers?  . . .
Fulfills Assignment How well does written and spoken work solve the problems outlined in this assignment? . . .
Are variations from the assignments made for  valid & creative reasons? . . .
Knowledge Gaining knowledge & awareness of art terminology & art purposes & concepts.  . . .
Gaining knowledge and awareness of artists and their styles and work.  . . .
Helpful Is the student positive, cooperative, tactful,  & considerate in discussions?  . . .
A thoughtful listener. Asked good questions? . . .
Work Habits Attentive and participatory? . . .
Do conversations with classmates stick to  art topics and other appropriate related topics? . . .
Composition
And Design
Did the student notice the principles of design and composition and wonder how things worked visually? . . .
Wonders about visual causes and effects in art? . . .
Formatted for printing.  All rights reserved. Attributed copies may be made for non-profit educational classroom use.
© Marvin Bartel, Instructor, Goshen College.     http://www.goshen.edu/art/ed/rubric3.html

Others need to contact the author for permission to publish any part of this document.

Art Education HOME page                                updated 6-2011

Also see: 
A printable Rubric for grading a student's Artwork. Free for educational non-profit use.
A printable Critique Form for students and teachers to write a critique on artwork.
NOTE: Good teaching includes finding ways to give helpful feedback.  By filling out a rubric and giving it the the student, the student learns the art teacher's ideas about art and how to become a better artist.  Students also learn when they fill out rubrics about their own and their classmates' performances.  Rubrics should not replace face-to-face teaching and learning, but rubrics may be a time saving way to provide some formal feedback.   --mb

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