Recent Posts

July 18, 2014

After five weeks of language and culture studies in Lima (and one week of travel to Cusco and Machu Picchu), the Goshen students say goodbye to their Lima host families and teachers and travel to their service locations. They spend a second six-week period scattered across the country, working in schools, clinics, churches and social service organizations.                 Before they go, however, the Peru groups have traditionally thrown a farewell party – or despedida – for the host families. The party is a chance for the students to thank their host families for…

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July 17, 2014

Goshen College students had the opportunity to view works of art, interview the artist and gain insights into the creative process during a visit to the home and studio of Victor Delfin, Peru’s leading painter and sculptor. Delfin, 87, is considered Peru’s most accomplished artist. The youngest child in a poor family from a fishing village in northwestern Peru, Delfin graduated from the National School of Fine Arts in Lima in 1958. He served briefly as director of the Puno School of Fine Arts and then as an art teacher in Chile. Fifty years ago, Delfin established an eclectic art studio…

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July 17, 2014

Fútbol just for the fun of it

Goshen College students spent their second Saturday in Lima playing soccer and volleyball with host family members and their friends. The spirited play took place at the municipal sports complex in the San Isidro district of Lima on a warm and gray morning. The students  loved it, especially the opportunity to play “fulbito,” a scaled down version of soccer. Although fútbol, or soccer, is Peru’s national sport, fulbito is played more frequently, especially among adults because it can be played on a smaller field of artificial grass, concrete, asphalt or even dirt. There are six players per side, plus a…

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July 16, 2014

Raising joy in the garden

It’s a cloudy June day, and Señora Gregoria Flores meets us under the canopy where the gardeners scheme. This is where they plan their attack: The tilling and composting, the seeds sprinkled in neat rows, the watering. They will deploy beat-up old spades and rusty picks and leaky hoses. They plan planting and plot plots. The chalkboard in the little meeting area is full of beautiful Spanish garden words that roll off the tongue like smooth pebbles: rabanita, betarraga, espinaca, acelga, camote, abono (radish, beet, spinach, chard, yam, fertilizer). In a few months, the gardeners will be eating the organic…

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July 16, 2014

Just as the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 traumatized many people in the United States, Peru’s war on terror in the 1980s and 1990s continues to traumatize Peruvians. And just as in the United States, the final chapter of the war has yet to be written. In 1980, members of the Communist Party of Peru, more commonly known as the Sendero Luminoso (Shining Path), began a guerilla war to overthrow the government, elevate the rural poor and establish a communist state modeled on the philosophy of Mao Zedung (Mao Tse-tung), the founder of the People’s Republic of China. Besides…

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July 15, 2014

Should Peru’s government continue its ban on genetically modified organisms? Should it limit the development of squatter communities? Should Peru continue to pay motorists to retire older vehicles from Lima’s streets? Is tourism a great thing for Peru? And are Peruvians and North Americans basically the same at heart? These provocative questions were discussed and debated by Goshen College students during a recent afternoon at Casa Goshen. SST Co-Directors Judy Weaver and Richard R. Aguirre developed the idea of having the students explore these issues in an academic exercise inspired by the radio program “Intelligence Squared U.S.,” Oxford-style debates heard…

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July 14, 2014

One of the leading Peruvian literary figures we learned about was Ricardo Palma, whose own life was as fascinating as his stories. We got a sense of the author as a man and Peruvian by visiting his home – now a museum – in the Miraflores district of Lima. Palma lived from 1833 to 1919, a period of great change in Peru. In addition to a rich life of reading and writing from an early age to the end of his days, Palma was a naval officer, a survivor of a shipwreck, a friend to presidents and a political activist…

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July 13, 2014

Mention the “War of the Pacific” in the United States and most people will think about the epic World War II battles that pitted Japan and the United States and allied powers. Mention “War of the Pacific” in South America and most people will recall the 19th century war between Chile, Peru and Bolivia whose outcome continues to spur resentment among citizens of the three nations. Goshen College students recently got the opportunity to learn more about that war through a complex war strategy game designed to entertain, educate and foster peace and understanding among the people of Peru, Chile and…

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July 12, 2014

What makes Machu Picchu so remarkable? It was not known to the Spaniards who invaded and took over the Inca Empire in the 16th century. No major events or battles happened there. It remained unknown to the outside world until 1911, when local families led a North American explorer to the 500-year-old walls, covered in jungle vegetation. The explorer, Hiram Bingham, returned with a National Geographic team to excavate and photograph it, and soon the whole world was enthralled by this breath-taking mountain village. Because of Machu Picchu, the rest of the world began to know something about the beautiful…

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July 11, 2014

After Cusco, we made our way through the Valle Sagrada, or Sacred Valley of the Incas, so called because it contained stunning lands and properties that belonged to the emperor himself.  We started the day in the ancient Inca capital of Cusco, visiting the central plaza – one of the most beautiful in South America – and a market. Then our bus took us on to some of those famous Inca sites. We visited Chinchero, where the great Inca sat on a throne of stone to observe religious festivities in a wide, artificially-flattened parade ground below.  A colonial-era church now…

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