PAST FELLOWS

From 2008-12 CIIE gave the opportunity for both visiting and resident faculty to conduct research on a variety of topics. Here are the past fellows who’ve conducted research from 2008-2012.

Fellows conduct research in one of the following areas:

  • Social/Demographic Context of Latino Students
  • Educational Experience of Latino Students in Local Schools
  • Higher Education Experience of CIIE Students
  • Curriculum Innovation, Teaching and/or Intercultural Campus Transformation
  • Intercultural process to Theological/Institutional Identity Issues

Past Fellows (2011-2012)

Kimberly Case

Research Associate, CIIE

Topic: The Role of Summer Bridge Programs in Equipping Students of Color for Successful Transition to College:

Abstract: As students of color transition to predominantly White Campuses, they benefit from summer bridge programs that promote social and academic integration. Using a pre/post-test design and data from two cohorts, this study examined gains in college self-efficacy, social connectedness, ethnic identity and academic skills development.

ANN HOSTETLER, PH.D.

Professor of English

TOPIC: Exploring the Emergence of Critical Consciousness in the College-level Study of Ethnic Literature

This project traces the emergence of critical consciousness among college students engaged in the study of Mennonite literature at a Mennonite College. In particular, it focuses on an interactive blog kept by the class as a tool for responding to reflective questions.

JAN BENDER SHETLER, PH.D.

Professor of History

TOPIC: Representing New Faces in Local Immigration History: Collaboration with the Elkhart County Historical
Society/Museum

This project seeks to diversify the representation of Elkhart County history at the Museum in Bristol and to bring attention to sources for the county’s ethnic histories. The project collected information and historical resources on under-represented groups that have immigrated in the last century. In Phase I (2011-12) of the project we will produce “Finding Aids” of archival, museum and other historical resources to enable future students and scholars to research these topics. 

 ALIAH CAROLAN-SILVA, PH.D.

CIIE Research Fellow

TOPIC: Latino/a Students’ Perceptions of a College-going Culture: Utilizing Mixed Methods to Examine College Access

This presentation explores Latino students’ experiences with the college-going culture in their school, based on data from a mixed-methods research study.

BOB YODER, D.MIN.

Campus Pastor, Director of Youth Ministry

TOPIC: Administrative Faculty and Staff as Faith Mentors to Goshen College Latino/a Students

This project will explore the role of Goshen College administrative faculty and staff as “faith mentors” of our Latino/a students and to further explore what it means for Goshen College to be a mentoring environment to our Latino/a students.

 

Past Fellows (2010-2011)

Ruben Viramontez AnguianoRuben Viramontez Anguiano, Ph.D (Bowling Green State University, Ass. Prof. of Human Development and Family Science)

Topic: An Ecological Exploration of Intersecting Capitals and Their Impact on the Educational Success of Latino Students in Northeast Indiana

Area of Study: The relationship between the family, community, and institutions for the academic success of Latino students.

The purpose of this study will be to explore how intersecting capitals, including social, cultural and intercultual capital at the familial, school and community impact the educational motivation and success of Latino students at the pre-college and college levels in Northeastern Indiana. The major overarching goal of the study is to understand how families, schools and communities can work together throughout the educational pipeline to ensure the path to higher education for Latino students.

 

Kim CaseKim Case, Ph.D. (Higher Education)

Topic: Experiences of African American and Latino College Students in the Classroom and the Teaching Practices that Contribute to Their Learning

Through previous research, much is known about how students learn best and about the teaching practices that facilitate good learning. Unique dynamics within an intercultural classroom can enhance or sometimes hinder student learning.  This study will focus on the learning experiences of African American and Latino students by examining students’ classroom experiences alongside the attributes, attitudes, beliefs, behaviors, and teaching methods of professors who facilitate learning.

 

Bonfiglio, ChristieAliah Carolan-Silva, Ph.D. (Education-Curriculum & Instruction)

Topic: The Influence of Latino Students’ Social Networks on Their Academic Achievement

Area of Study: Educational Experience of Latino Students in Local Schools

Dr. Carolan-Silva’s research explores Latino students’ educational experiences through an ethnographic study in local schools. She uses social capital theory to examine Latino youth as they are nested within family, peer, school and community networks and the combination of factors that lead to students’ educational achievements. Through examining how students’ social networks provide a means to attain resources that contribute to educational achievement, she hopes to offer implications for both schools and families about how to better support the education of Latino children.

 

Bonfiglio, ChristieChristie Bonfiglio, Ph.D. (Education)

Topic: Response to Intervention (RTI) & the Implications for Minority Students and Academic Success

Area of Study: Educational Experience of Latino Students in Local Schools

“Response to Intervention” (RTI) is an emerging approach to the diagnosis of learning disabilities that holds considerable promise as a student with academic deficits is given research-validated interventions, and the student’s progress is monitored frequently to determine if those interventions are sufficient to help the student catch up with his or her peers. If the student fails to show significantly improved academic skills despite several well-designed and implemented interventions, this failure to ‘respond to intervention’ can be viewed as evidence of an underlying learning disability. One advantage of RTI is that it allows schools to intervene early to meet the needs of struggling learners rather than waiting for them to fail. Another is that RTI maps those specific instructional strategies found to benefit a particular student, which can be very helpful to both teachers and parents (Fuchs, Mock, Morgan, & Young, 2003).

Given this information, this project undertakes the RTI approach for identifying local elementary students of color who are in need of early intervention with regards to reading instruction. Such early intervention will validate this process within the local school district and will potentially dissuade inaccurate identification of special educational services for students who are disproportionately represented within such population and offer them an alternative means for success.

 

Bonfiglio, ChristieOdelet Nance, Ph.D.

Topic: The Efficacy of Internal and External Support Systems for African American Students at Goshen College

 

 

 

Bonfiglio, ChristieBob Yoder, (Religious Studies)

Topic: Faculty as Faith Mentors to Goshen College Latino/a Students In and Out of the Classroom

Area of Study: This project will explore the role of teaching faculty as “faith mentors” of our Latino/a students by equipping faculty with specific, tangible ways for effective faith mentorship, in and out of the classroom . This project will further explore what it means for Goshen College to be a mentoring environment to our Latino/a students as we reach out to students with diverse theological backgrounds, particularly among our ever-growing Latino/a population. I will draw from the work of Sharon Daloz Parks in her book, Big Questions, Worthy Dreams: Mentoring Young Adults in their Search for Meaning, Purpose, and Faith, from the recent findings of the National Study of Youth and Religion in their book Souls in Transition: The Religious and Spiritual Lives of Emerging Adults, from the findings of The Spirituality in Higher Education project (UCLA) in their book Cultivating the Spirit: How College Can Enhance Students’ Inner Lives, and from other books and resources. This project will also draw from personal and group interviews of both students and faculty.

 

Bonfiglio, ChristieChristine Noria, Ph.D. (Education)

Topic: The Role of Attribution, Motivation and Belonging for Latino Students in Higher Education

 

 

 

Bonfiglio, Christie

Brenda Srof.  (Nursing)

Topic: The Experience of Ethnic Identity Formation and Subsequent Caring Practices Among Latino/a Nursing Graduates

Ethnic identity formation is characterized by self identification, feelings of belong, commitment to a group, and a sense of shared values.  The experience of college is an important time for ethnic identity formation as the student navigates the feelings of belonging with one’s own cultural group and the belonging within the context of the college environment.  Within the profession of nursing, the experience of belonging is imbedded in the construct of caring as a central construct of the profession.  The purpose of this research is to describe the meaning of the experience of ethnic identity formation among Latino/a nursing students as reflected among recent Latino/a nursing graduates.   A second purpose of this research is to describe the meaning of the Latino/a student’s journey for his/her own caring practices.   The design of this qualitative study is interpretive phenomenology.  The purpose of phenomenology is to understand the structure of a concept or phenomenon as a lived experience of the person. The expression of experiences of individuals is formulated into the universal essence of the experience. The study is relevant to the development of the science of nursing and the methodology of nursing education.

Past Fellows (2009-2010)

Aliah Carolan-SilvaAliah Carolan-Silva, Ph.D (Education-Curriculum & Instruction)

Topic: The Influence of Latino Students’ Social Networks on Their Academic Achievement

Area of Study: Educational Experience of Latino Students in Local Schools

Dr. Carolan-Silva’s research explores Latino students’ educational experiences through an ethnographic study in local schools. She uses social capital theory to examine Latino youth as they are nested within family, peer, school and community networks and the combination of factors that lead to students’ educational achievements. Through examining how students’ social networks provide a means to attain resources that contribute to educational achievement, she hopes to offer implications for both schools and families about how to better support the education of Latino children.

David LindDavid Lind, Ph.D. (Sociology)

Topic: Appraising Community Belonging Through Food & Nutrition: An Exploratory Study of Latino Experience in the Goshen Community

Area of Study: Social/Demographic Context of Latino Students

Transnational migration has created multicultural places across the Midwestern United States. What roles do food and nutrition play in the cultural, economic and social integration of these pluralistic sites? The purpose of Dr. Lind’s research is to identify and explore indicators of community belonging among Latino residents of the Goshen community with particular attention to the relationship between food, food security and community identity.

 

Bonfiglio, ChristieChristie Bonfiglio, Ph.D. (Education)

Topic: Response to Intervention (RTI) & the Implications for Minority Students and Academic Success

Area of Study: Educational Experience of Latino Students in Local Schools

“Response to Intervention” (RTI) is an emerging approach to the diagnosis of learning disabilities that holds considerable promise as a student with academic deficits is given research-validated interventions, and the student’s progress is monitored frequently to determine if those interventions are sufficient to help the student catch up with his or her peers. If the student fails to show significantly improved academic skills despite several well-designed and implemented interventions, this failure to ‘respond to intervention’ can be viewed as evidence of an underlying learning disability. One advantage of RTI is that it allows schools to intervene early to meet the needs of struggling learners rather than waiting for them to fail. Another is that RTI maps those specific instructional strategies found to benefit a particular student, which can be very helpful to both teachers and parents (Fuchs, Mock, Morgan, & Young, 2003).

Given this information, this project undertakes the RTI approach for identifying local elementary students of color who are in need of early intervention with regards to reading instruction. Such early intervention will validate this process within the local school district and will potentially dissuade inaccurate identification of special educational services for students who are disproportionately represented within such population and offer them an alternative means for success.

 

Kevin GaryKevin Gary, Ph.D. (Education)

Topic: Teacher Dispositions, Multicultural Education, & the Good Life

Area of Study: Teacher Attrition and the Virtues of Excellent Teachers

Dr. Gary’s research focuses on excellent teachers at diverse schools who have taught for more than seven years, noting how such teachers conceptualize and understand the art of teaching? This study is situated in the context of Richard Ingersoll’s recent and comprehensive report on teacher attrition, which finds that “after just five years, between 40 and 50 percent of all beginning teachers” leave teaching altogether. In short, Dr. Gary’s study seeks to understand what sustains good teachers and how they understand the art of teaching.

 

Rebecca HorstRebecca Horst, M.A. (Campus Ministries – Academic Office)

Topic: Exploring the Convocation and Chapel Experience of Diverse Student Populations at Goshen College

Area of Study: Higher Education Experience of CIIE Students

All Goshen College students are required to attend an average of one convocation or chapel service per week as part of their general education program. Because the student population is quite diverse, their experience of this universal requirement is presumed to be quite diverse as well. This project will investigate the convocation and chapel experience of CIIE students compared to other student groups. Findings from this project are intended to improve the capacity of convocations and chapel services as venues for intercultural and integrated learning at Goshen College.

 

Carlos Gutierez, M.A. (Business – Marketing)

Topic: Study of Financial Aid as a Marketing Tool in Recruiting Latino Students

Area of Study: Higher Education Experience of CIIE Students

The focus of this study is to examine existing strategies for marketing financial aid information to students and explore whether these methods or strategies are the most effective tools in the recruitment of Latino students in Elkhart County. As part of this process, an analysis of cultural views regarding financial aid (particularly loans) will be examined as well as other factors such as trust, the college’s reputation and families’ economic status. A SWOT and benchmarking analysis will also be performed to study how Goshen College compares with similar size institutions in the marketing of financial aid products to Latino students. Implications and conclusions of this study will be suggested in light of existing motivation and marketing related theories.

Past Fellows (2008-09)

Getnet BitewGetnet Bitew, Ph.D. (Education)

Topic: An Investigation of the College Experience of Latino Students at Goshen College

Dr. Bitew is investigated the curricular and co-curricular experiences of Latino students at Goshen College using questionnaires, interviews, observation and document analysis. Informants included not only the students, but also teachers, parents, staff and non-Latino students. Dr. Bitew sought to contribute to policy and curriculum practices through a deeper understanding of the identity factors and exclusionary forces of students’ College experiences.

Some themes emerged from his interviews, including the need to form a College Support Group for High School Latino Students in the surrounding community. This group’s focus would be to provide orientation about college, availability of opportunities and so on to Latino and other students whose parents may have little experience of higher education.

 

Lynda NyceLynda Nyce, Ph.D.  (Sociology)

Topic: Transnational Migration in the Goshen Context:  Implications for Higher Education

Dr. Nyce’s project explored the realities of transnational migrations to and from Goshen.  The project contributed to the work of the Center for Intercultural Teaching and Learning by providing both an increased understanding of the community and identification of constraints on the pursuit of higher education among Latinos.

Interviews with members of the community documented the frequency of transnational migrations, the social networks that facilitate both the migrations and acquisition of employment and the narratives of meaning given to these moves.

The project situated understandings of transnational migrations and educational constraints in the context of debates surrounding the enforcement of federal immigration law and of global economic realities.

Three questions guided Dr. Nyce’s research:

  1. What are the experiences of migration, immigration, and transnational connections of Latinos who are settling in the Goshen and Ligonier area;
  2. What are the social networks among these Latinos that support daily life;
  3. How does educational decision-making operate within the life of transnational immigrant families?

The Goshen area has been going through much strain as a result of economic decline.  Latino immigrants are leaving or considering leaving the area; Latino immigrant families are living in precarious situations due to the overall economic downturn (e.g. three households combine into one in which 15 people are surviving on one source of income). The informal economy, particularly among undocumented immigrants, is active but not very lucrative.

Jerrell Ross RicherJerrell Ross Richer, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics

Topic: The Economics of Immigration in Elkhart County, Indiana

Economic forces have been prominent in the decisions made by thousands of workers to emigrate from Mexico to northern Indiana over the past decade. The opportunity to earn much higher wages motivated people from Hidalgo and other Mexican states to seek employment in Elkhart and surrounding counties.  But during 2008-2009 the national economy experienced an economic slowdown, and the local unemployment rate increased as manufacturers laid off workers and suspended production.

The economic downturn reduced immigration and could even lead to out-migration of both documented and undocumented workers. The decreasing number of Latinos residing in Elkhart County could help ease the local unemployment problem in the short run, but out-migration could also hasten the economic slowdown as the immigrant community reduces its consumption of locally-produced goods and its contribution to the local, state and federal tax base.

The purpose of Dr. Richer’s research project was to investigate how economic forces affect immigration and how immigrants contribute to the local economy in the context of the economic downturn.

Elkhart County has one of the highest Mexican-born population concentrations in the entire United States east of the Mississippi River.  9.1 percent of Elkhart County’s population in 2007 was foreign-born. 12.3 percent of the population speaks Spanish at home, second only to Lake County, a heavily-Latino area southeast of Chicago.

With nearly 40 percent of its workforce dedicated to manufacturing, Elkhart County was hit hard by the economic downturn. The September 2008 unemployment rate for Elkhart County was 9.3 percent, a sharp increase from 4.6 percent in 2007.

 

Rafael FalconRafael Falcon, Ph.D., Professor of Spanish

Topic: Exploring Cultural Identity and Assimilation with CIIE Students

What role should ethnic identity exploration play in supporting the educational experience of Latino students?  Dr. Falcon explored cultural identity and assimilation issues among Center for Intercultural Teaching and Learning students through group discussions of the book Mi Gente: In Search of the Hispanic Soul and individual interviews.

Dr. Falcon addressed in discussions such as:

  1. Historical and personal understandings of the terms “Hispanic” and “Latino.”
  2. Personal cultural identity. Responses to “The Reflection of My Essence” included appreciation for traditional Hispanic values, a relaxed integration into U.S. non-Hispanic culture and a comfortable multicultural balance.
  3. The short story “Going Home” directed students to reflect on the challenges and aspects of life they would enjoy in returning to the country of their Hispanic origin.

 

Kevin GaryKevin Gary, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education

Topic: Teacher Interiority and Multicultural Encounters

How can teachers create a space that is hospitable while at the same time challenging students toward a genuine and meaningful intercultural encounter? Drawing on the work of philosophers Martin Buber, Emmanuel Levinas and Simone Weil, as well as the writings of multicultural theorists Sonia Nieto and Geneva Gay, Dr. Gary explicated what the dynamics of a genuine and productive intercultural encounter look like and reflected on classroom practice: how teachers nurture, avoid or resist such encounters.

The National Council of Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) asks schools of education to assess the dispositions of pre-service teacher candidates. Teacher dispositions are “in the long run, more important than knowledge and skills” for they indicate “predictive patterns of action” (Borko, Liston, & Whitcomb, 2007). Dr. Gary’s overarching aim was to substantively identify teacher dispositions that contribute to student academic success and retention, with a particular focus on Latino students.