English

Jessica Baldanzi, Associate Professor of English
Skip Barnett, Associate Professor of English, International Student Advisor
Beth Birky, Professor of English and Women's Studies
Ann Hostetler, Department Chair, Professor of English
Kyle Schlabach, Assistant Professor of English, Record Advisor

Introduction

The English department offers three majors and three minors. Four teacher certification options are also available.

Visit the English department website at www.goshen.edu/english for more information.

Students choosing any major in the English department may customize their degrees with a balance of literature, writing, and language courses. Literature courses feature diverse special topics courses alongside traditional literary surveys, with a particular concern for issues of race, class, gender, popular culture, and world literature in English. Writing courses help students develop skills in multiple genres, with specific attention to audience and publication. Through historical and sociological frameworks, language courses teach the power of language as a social and artistic tool.

Through a minor in English or writing, students from any discipline can select courses to support their professional goals and personal interests. The English minor helps students enhance critical thinking, reading and communication skills. The writing minor, taught in collaboration with the Communication department, provides valuable training in writing, revision, and hands-on editing for students in any major. TESOL minors gain an intercultural framework and fundamental skills for teaching English in a variety of settings.

The English department offers co-curricular opportunities in editing, publishing and writing. Students serve on Broadside and Pinchpenny Press boards, edit a literary arts journal, Red Cents, serve as an intern for the online Journal of the Center for Mennonite Writing, write articles for the department web site, produce the department newsletter, or tutor in the Writing Center. Many English students also gain experience editing or writing for The Record, the college newspaper, or by doing internships in editing, publishing, or writing. Each year, English students are chosen for the Horswell publishing fellowship, which gives students an internship in publishing, and the Sara Ann Freed scholarship, which honors a female student or students who have shown promise in creative writing and publishing. TESOL and English secondary education majors complete field work in local schools or abroad.

Teacher education certification in English and TESOL

In collaboration with the Education department, the English department offers four different teacher education state certification programs that equip students to teach English or English Learners (EL) in public schools and elsewhere:

  • Grades 5-12 certification in English/Language Arts education: in addition to, or as part of, the English major, students complete an additional survey course; Engl 230; Engl 319; Comm 200; Comm 202; Educ 307; a writing course; and the Secondary Education track in the Education department, including a semester of student teaching.
  • Grades K-6 certification in English Learners education (EL): students complete the normal Elementary Education major and Engl 204, 310, 315, 319, 320 and 325 (unless student teaching is done in EL).
  • Grades 5-12 certification in EL: students complete the TESOL major and the Secondary Education track in the Education department.
  • Grades K-12 certification in EL: students complete the TESOL major and the Secondary Education track and also take Engl 325 for 2 credits.

The first education class, Educ 201, should be taken in May term of the first year or fall of the sohpomore year. See the Education department pages and the Teacher Education Handbook for more details about requirements.

Honors thesis

Students who wish to complete a major scholarly or creative project as part of their English, English Writing, or TESOL major may enroll in Engl 499, English Honors Thesis, a three-credit hour independent study designed for this purpose.

Career and postgraduate opportunities

English is a major that teaches the highly transferable skills of analysis, critical thinking, language use, and written and oral communication, and prepares students for a wide range of jobs after graduation. Our English graduates are employed around the world, in occupations such as administration, editing, grant writing, journalism, law, library science, museum studies, publishing, research, and teaching at the secondary or university level. A significant number of TESOL graduates are engaged in teaching English as a second language in the U.S. and abroad, as well as serving in legal and business translation. Many graduates serve church agencies or train for the ministry. The English major also serves as a foundation for careers in business, medicine, web development, and social services, and prepares students for graduate study in literature, rhetoric, journalism or creative writing.

Major in English

39 credit hours

  • Engl 201, World Literature 3
  • Engl 204, Expository Writing 3
  • Engl 300, Critical Theory and Practice 3
  • One British Literature course 3
    Engl 301, British Literature I or
    Engl 302, British Literature II
  • One American Literature course 3
    Engl 303, American Literature I or
    Engl 309, American Literature II
  • Engl 315, The English Language 3
  • Engl 409, Senior Practicum 1-2
  • Engl 410, English Senior Seminar 2
  • Elective courses in English 15
  • Related course selected from the following: 3
    aesthetics, art history, Bible/religion, children's and adolescent literature, communication, history, linguistics, music history, sociology, peace/justice/conflict studies, philosophy, TESOL methods, theater, women's and gender studies

Student learning outcomes

Graduates in English will:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of American, English, and World literature in an aesthetic, cultural and historical context.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of the history and use of the English language.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of the history and practice of literary criticism.
  4. Demonstrate mastery of the above knowledge base at a level suitable for graduate school preparation.
  5. Analyze literature using appropriate formal and critical tools.
  6. Conduct traditional and digital literary research and present it through oral, written, and/or electronic formats.
  7. Develop proficiency in expository, professional, analytical, and/or creative writing, culminating in the design and development of a professional quality senior portfolio.
  8. Use reading, writing and critical thinking to integrate faith and ethics with personal identity.
  9. Contribute to the world on a local or global level as a culturally competent reader, writer, and thinker.

Planning guide

First year

Goshen Core
Academic Voice
Goshen Seminar
World Literature
Introduction to Creative Writing
Literature and Popular Culture

Second year Goshen Core
Expository Writing
Critical Theory and Practice
British or American Literature course
Literature of Ethnicity, Gender and Race
SST
Third year Goshen Core
American or British Literature course
The English Language
English electives
Related course
Fourth year Balance of Goshen Core
Balance of major and related courses
Senior Practicum
Senior Seminar

Planning and advising notes

Students earning Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), or CLEP credit in English are strongly encouraged to take Engl 204 during the first year. AP Literature or Language test score of 4 or IB SL score of 5 fulfills the Academic Voice requirement. IB HL score of 5 fulfills both Academic Voice and Goshen Seminar requirements. Most AP and IB literature and language courses will count as elective credits toward graduation, but not toward the English major.

In the Goshen Core, English majors should take an Artistic World course in disciplines other than literature.

Nine credit hours of the English elective courses in the major must be upper level (300-400 level). Most AP and IB literature and language courses will count as elective credits toward graduation, but not toward the English major.

The related course in the major may not be an applied courses (such as Record editing or music lessons or a studio art class) or be used to fulfill requirements of the Goshen Core. The related course may be counted toward another major only if it is required by that major. See Academic policies and requirements.

Students doing student teaching for English/Language Arts Secondary Education do not need to take Engl 409, English Practicum.

English majors are encouraged to get involved with communication or English co-curricular activities such as The Record, The Maple Leaf, Pinchpenny Press, Broadside, or Red Cents. Comm 200, Communication Practice or Engl 290, English Publication are recommended in the third year.

Students with a second major, in addition to English, may choose to take a senior seminar in just one major field, substituting an elective course in the other major.

Major in English writing

40 credit hours

  • Engl 201, World Literature 3
  • Engl 203, Introduction to Creative Writing 3
  • Engl 204, Expository Writing 3
  • Engl 280, Sophomore Portfolio 1
  • Engl 312, Writing Workshop (repeatable to 3 credit hours) 1
  • Engl 315, The English Language 3
  • Engl 319, English Grammar 1
  • Three Writing Courses 9
    Comm 250, Writing for Media
    Comm 308, Feature Writing
    Engl 330, Writing Fiction
    Engl 332, Writing Poetry
    Engl 334, Writing Creative Nonfiction
    Engl 336, Special Topics in Writing
    Thea 350, Playwriting
  • Two Literature/Language electives 6
    Engl 210, Introduction to Literature
    Engl 207/307, Literature of Ethnicity, Gender, and Race
    Engl 230, Literature and Popular Culture
    Engl 300, Critical Theory and Practice
    Engl 301, 302, 303, 309, British or American Literature
    Engl 305, Genre Studies
    Engl 306, Major Author
    Engl 310, Introduction to Linguistics
  • One course in media context or production experience 3
    Art 107, Design
    Comm 108, Digital Design
    Comm 255, Photocommunication
    Comm 260, Broadcast Writing
    Comm 326, Creating for the Web
    Comm 350, Reporting for the Public Good
  • Engl 408, Senior Writing Practicum 2
  • Engl 410, English Senior Seminar 2
  • Related course in the Arts selected from the following: 3
    Art 241, 242, or 343, History of Art
    Art/Mus/Thea 355, Arts in London
    Mus 204, Survey of Music Literature
    Thea 225, Introduction to Theater
    Thea 235, The Power of Story
    Thea 245, Aesthetics
    Thea 387, History of Theater

Student learning outcomes

Graduates in English writing will:

  1. Develop the vocabulary and conceptual tools to analyze, discuss, and create poetry, fiction, and nonfiction prose.
  2. Gain familiarity with classic and recent creative works, particularly with an eye to their craft, as well as to their place and purpose in twenty-first century culture.
  3. Develop knowledge of the intellectual and cultural frameworks of American, English, and Anglophone literature and language.
  4. Demonstrate mastery of a range of writing tools, including revision and editing strategies that foster the successful practice of creative and expository writing.
  5. Develop and design a series of portfolios that encourage self-assessment and focus in the student's work, leading to a professional writing sample in a chosen genre.
  6. Analyze the role of cultural context, audience, and individual voice in writing through creative collaboration.
  7. Use reading, critical thinking, editing, and writing to integrate faith and ethics with personal identity.
  8. Take ownership of an articulate written voice that can create change in the world.

Planning guide

First year

Goshen Core
Goshen Seminar
Introduction to Creative Writing
World Literature
Expository Writing

Second year Goshen Core
Writing elective
Writing Workshop
Media context/production experience course
Sophomore portfolio
SST
Third year Goshen Core
Writing elective
Literature elective
The English Language, English Grammar
English publishing or communication practice (encouraged)
Related arts course
Fourth year Balance of Goshen Core
Balance of major
Senior Writing Practicum
Senior Seminar

Planning and advising notes

Students earning AP, IB, or CLEP credit in English are strongly encouraged to take Engl 204 during the first year. AP Literature or Language test scores of 4 or IB SL score of 5 fulfills the Academic Voice requirement. IB HL score of 5 fulfills both Academic Voice and Goshen Seminar requirement. Most AP and IB literature and language courses will count as elective credits toward graduation, but not toward the English writing major.

Students completing the sophomore portfolio should meet with the English writing program adviser in the fall of their sophomore year or as soon as they declare an English writing major to determine the best semester for enrolling in that course.

English writing majors are encouraged to get involved with Communication or English co-curricular activities such as The Record, The Maple Leaf, Pinchpenny Press, Broadside, or Red Cents. Comm 200, Communication Practice or Engl 290, English Publishing are recommended in the third year.

Students with a second major, in addition to English writing, may choose to take a senior seminar in just one major field, substituting an elective course in the other major.

Major in teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL)

39-42 credit hours

  • Comm 206, Communicating Across Cultures 3
  • Educ 303, Literacy I 3
  • Educ 406, Literacy II 3
  • One of the following literature courses 3
  • Engl 201, World Literature (required if not pursuing teacher licensure in ELL)
    Educ 307, Children's and Adolescent Literature (required for ELL teacher licensure)
  • Engl 204, Expository Writing 3
  • Engl 310, Introduction to Linguistics 3
  • Engl 315, The English Language 3
  • Engl 319, English Grammar 1
  • Engl 320, Methods of TESOL 4
  • Engl 325, TESOL Practicum 2-3
  • Engl 410, English Senior Seminar 2
  • Additional foreign language beyond the 102-level 3
  • Two intercultural studies courses selected from the following: 6
    Educ 307, Children's and Adolescent Literature (an option here, if not obtaining ELL licensure)
    Engl 201, World Literature (an option here, if obtaining ELL licensure)
    Engl 207/307, Lit of Ethnicity, Gender, Race
    Hist 101, Ancient Roots of Culture
    Any intercultural course in the International studies minor list in the International Education section of the catalog. This course may not double count for the International Studies minor.

Student learning outcomes

Graduates in TESOL will:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the historical development, sociological contexts and systematic organization of languages in general and English in particular.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of language learning theories and language teaching methods and issues.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of culture's impact on world view, language, texts, and communication styles.
  4. Communicate effectively in a variety of sign systems, including oral, written and media.
  5. Apply language learning theories and evaluation methods in the use of a wide variety of effective stategies in the teaching of second languages.
  6. Contribute to society as a culturally competent teacher and communicator.
  7. Integrate faith and ethical awareness into the teaching of languages and interactions with language students.

Planning guide for TESOL major

First year Goshen Core
Academic Voice
Goshen Seminar
World Literature
Language courses for 102-level prerequisite
Communicating Across Cultures
Intercultural studies elective
Second year Goshen Core
Expository Writing
English Grammar
Additional foreign language
SST
Third year Goshen Core
Introduction to Linguistics
The English Language
Education courses*
Intercultural studies courses
Methods of TESOL
TESOL Practicum
Fourth year Balance of Goshen Core
Balance of major and related courses
English Senior Seminar

Planning and advising notes

Students earning AP, IB, or CLEP credit in English are strongly encouraged to take Engl 204 during the first year. AP Literature or Language test scores of 4 or IB SL score of 5 fulfills the Academic Voice requirement. IB HL score of 5 fulfills both Academic Voice and Goshen Seminar requirements.

*Elementary Education majors who want a K-5 EL license should choose the Elementary Education-English Learners major. See the Education section of the catalog for more information.

For the K-6 and 5-12 EL certifications, students should either do student teaching in EL (instead of Engl 325) or else do a non-EL student teaching placement and then Engl 325 for 2 credits. For K-12 EL certification, students should do EL student teaching with one age group (e.g., elementary students) and then Engl 325 for 2 credits with another age group (e.g. high school students). Non-Teacher Education students should do Engl 325 for 3 credits.

To complete the TESOL major, the minor, or the one-year certificate, students must demonstrate basic competence in some foreign language through the 102 level by testing or by courses. The "additional foreign language" requirement beyond the basic competence may be in the same language or a third language. Also, ASL may count as the basic foreign language or as the additional foreign language, but not as both.

Students with a second major, in addition to a TESOL major, may choose to take a senior seminar in either major field. Students who elect not to enroll in Engl 410, English Senior Seminar, must complete a senior portfolio for graduation. See the department chair for guidelines.

Minor in English

18 credit hours

  • Engl 204, Expository Writing 3
  • Any courses in the English department 15

    Note: At least 8 credits must be 300 level or above. AP, IB or CLEP credit may not count toward this minor.

Minor in writing

18 credit hours

  • Comm/Engl 204, Expository Writing 3
  • One of the following individualized courses:3
    Comm 412, Special Project
    Engl 280, Sophomore Portfolio and Engl 408, Senior Writing Practicum
  • Courses in journalistic and/or creative writing selected from the following 12
    Comm 250, Writing for Media
    Comm 260, Broadcast Writing
    Comm 308, Feature Writing
    Comm 326, Creating for the Web
    Comm 350, Reporting for the Public Good
    Engl 203, Introduction to Creative Writing
    Engl 312, Writing Workshop
    Engl 330, Writing Fiction
    Engl 332, Writing Poetry
    Engl 334, Writing Creative Nonfiction
    Engl 336, Special Topics in Writing
    Thea 350, Playwriting

Planning and advising notes

Students should choose an adviser from the Communication or English department faculty, depending on their particular field of interest.

Writing minors are encouraged to get involved with communication or English co-curricular activities, including The Record, The Maple Leaf, The Correspondent, Pinchpenny Press, Broadside, and Red Cents.

Students registering for Comm 412, Special Projects or Engl 408, Senior Writing Practicum must meet with an adviser and have a proposal approved in the semester prior to registering.

Minor in teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL)

20 credit hours

  • Engl 310, Introduction to Linguistics 3
  • Engl 315, The English Language 3
  • Engl 319, English Grammar 1
  • Engl 320, Methods of TESOL 4
  • Engl 325, TESOL Practicum or Student Teaching in EL 3
  • Additional intercultural studies courses 6
    selected from the list of courses for the international studies minor or additional foreign language courses beyond the general education prerequisite.

Planning and advising notes

To complete the minor, students must demonstrate basic competence in some foreign language through the 102 level by testing or by courses. The "additional foreign language" courses may be in the same language or a third language. Also, ASL may count as the basic foreign language or as the additional foreign language, but not as both.

English courses


ENGL 105 Introduction to College Writing 3
Introduction to college-level reading and writing skills (organization, focus, clarity, and development). Successful completion of this course fulfills the pre-requisite for Core 110 Academic Voice when a student's SAT/ACT score does not meet the SAT Critical Reading or Writing score of 480 or above, or the ACT English/Writing score of 20 or above, or when a student's high school GPA indicates a need for additional development of college-level writing and study skills.

ENGL 130 College Composition 3
Instruction in critical reading and analytical writing for academic context with focus on essay organization and style. Introduction to academic research and citation methods. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Engl 105, SAT Critical Reading or Writing score of 480 or higher, or ACT English/Writing score of 20 or higher.

ENGL 201 World Literature 3
Study of literature written in English outside of the United Kingdom and the United States that deals in a significant way with the intersection of cultures, particularly postcolonial literature from Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Latin America. Prerequisites: CORE 110.

ENGL 203 Introduction to Creative Writing 3
An introduction to the writing of poems, short stories and creative nonfiction, with emphasis on writing, reading and discussion.

ENGL 204 Expository Writing 3
Theory and practice of written communication. Assignments in a variety of prose forms aim at developing the student's control of logic, organization, rhetoric, usage, and audience accommodation. Prerequisite: CORE 110 or equivalent.

ENGL 205 Warriors and Peacemakers 3
War profoundly impacts the adulthood initiation experience of soldiers, peacemakers, and civilians. In addition to reading novels, plays, poems and memoirs, viewing films, painting and sculpture, we will listen to those who have lived through or served in conflict situations. We will also explore how artistic frameworks can help us to make sense of our own experience and the lived experiences of others. An Artistic World Perspectives course in the Goshen Core.

ENGL 206 Why Does Travel Writing Matter? 3
Travel writing attempts to bridge the distance between the observing self and the world, in a context where knowledge, power, and control are loosened from their normal orientations and subject to reorganization and reimagining. Students will examine the narratives of travelers who have undergone such experiences in new places and new societies and also create their own narratives of travel and intercultural exchange. An Artistic World Perspectives course in the Goshen Core.

ENGL 207 Lit of Ethnicity, Gender, Race 3
Study of literature shaped distinctively by cultural and theoretical concerns related to ethnicity, gender and race. Students may take Engl 207 more than once if different topics. Repeatable. Prerequisites:CORE 110. Specific topics, announced in advance, include the following:
Irish Literature in Ireland. Field studies in the cultural geography of 20th-century Irish authors with particular attention to the way politics, gender, religion, and violence have shaped Irish writing. Conducted during May or summer term at urban and rural locations in the Republic of Ireland.
American Indian Literature. Contemporary fiction and poetry by writers from a variety of American Indian traditions and backgrounds, with special emphasis on historical and cultural contexts and the revitalization of tribal practices, spirituality, ceremony and oral tradition.
African-American Literature. Twentieth-century fiction, poetry and essays spanning the broad range of African-American experiences, with an emphasis on the history of race in America as it informs the literary tradition. Literature integrated with music, art and performance.
Latino Literature. Fiction, poetry, and film by various Latino/a writers from diverse contexts, with an emphasis on both the distinctives of Latino literature and students' own position as Americans situated in a historical and cultural matrix.
Mennonite Literature. Recent literature -- mainly poetry and fiction -- by U.S. and Canadian Mennonite writers, studied in relation to Mennonite history, culture and theology.
Women in Literature. The study of literature written by women (mainly fiction and poetry) and of related issues such as the literary canon, gender representation and feminist literary theory. The syllabus will often include classic and contemporary women's literature by British, American, and World authors.

ENGL 209 Stories That Need To Be Told 3
Explores recent literary fiction in the U.S. that has broken into bestseller lists largely because of its urgent and authentic voice in the national cultural conversation. How does this fiction express the unique and changing identities and cultures of the United States? An Artistic World Perspectives course in the Goshen Core.

ENGL 210 Introduction to Literature 3
Analysis of literary texts in a genre chosen by individual professors. Instruction in literary analysis essay and literary research essay. Prerequisite: CORE110, or equivalent, SAT Critical Reading or Writing score of at least 650, ACT English/Writing score of at least 30, or permission of instructor.

ENGL 211 How Books Change the World 3
How have books changed the ways people think about their world? What is the future of the book in a digital information society? This course investigates the importance of books in shaping societies as well as individual identity and values. It also considers the history of books as material objects, cultural and communal objects, and instigators of technological change. An Artistic World Perspectives course in the Goshen Core.

ENGL 212 Word and Image 3
This course explores the relationship between visual and verbal art. Students develop skills in describing and analyzing visual and verbal works of art, including ekphrasis, the attempt to imitate visual art in writing. Students will contribute to class dialogue about how words and images work together, culminating in a final research project on a conversation between verbal and visual works. They will also create their own visual and verbal works of art. An Artistic World course in the Goshen Core.

ENGL 213 Shakespeare and Film 3
Why is Shakespeare still relevant today, across a diverse range of cultures and contexts? This course investigates the relationship between selected plays and their adaptations in film and popular culture. Students will develop skills in reading and interpreting texts of Shakespeare's plays and also skills in visual and cultural analysis of films they have inspired. An Artistic World course in the Goshen Core.

ENGL 214 Banned Books 3
Why are works of literature so frequently banned in the U.S.? How can literature honor dissenting voices and create a space for dialogue around controversial issues? This course will examine four or five major banned books in their historical and cultural contexts. Groups of students will research each situation and lead class members in examining objections and responses to each text, including aesthetic, ethical, social and religious values. An Artistic World course in the Goshen Core.

ENGL 230 Literature and Popular Culture 3
Study of literature in relation to film, television, or other media of popular culture. Specific topics, announced in advance, may include Shakespeare in Film, the Graphic Novel, or Global Images in Film. Repeatable.

ENGL 280 Sophomore Writing Portfolio 1
Guided instruction on portfolio development, including editing and revising skills needed for advanced writing courses. Students should meet with the English writing program adviser in the fall of their sophomore year to determine the best semester to complete this project. Prerequisite: Engl 204 and one additional writing course. Course grade will be Credit/No Credit.

ENGL 290 English Publication 1 (1-2)
Applied work in publication (Pinchpenny Press, Broadside, Red Cents, the department newsletter or blog). Students choosing to publish with Pinchpenny Press must register for this course, select a faculty adviser, and fulfill stated requirements. Repeatable. Prerequisite: Engl 204 and two additional writing courses, and consent of instructor. Course grade will be Credit/No Credit.

ENGL 300 Critical Theory & Practice 3
This course examines critical interpretive strategies and theories as applied to several literary genres. In addition, the course introduces students to important research skills involved in the production of literary criticism. Intended as an introduction to the English major and as an elective for other (usually upper-level) students. Prerequisite: CORE 110 and any college-level literature course.

ENGL 301 British Literature I 3
Development of British literature from Beowulf through the medieval period, Renaissance, and 18th century, with special attention to questions of canon, context, and identity. Prerequisite: CORE 110.

ENGL 302 British Literature II 3
Development of British literature from the Romantic era through the Victorian, modern and post-modern periods, with special attention to issues of modernity, industrialization, imperialism, and globalization. Prerequisite: CORE 110.

ENGL 303 American Literature I 3
Development of American literature, culture, and literary identity from colonial times through the 19th century. Prerequisite: CORE 110.

ENGL 305 Genre Studies 3
Study of a single genre as announced, sometimes with focus on writings of a specific period or place. Typical offerings include:
History of the Novel. The reading and study of significant works illustrating the development of the novel.
Contemporary Poetry. The reading and study of poetry and poets working since 1945. In addition to critical writing, each student will practice writing poems in an effort to better understand the creation and artistic nature of poetry. Repeatable. Prerequisite: CORE 110.

ENGL 306 Major Author 3
A study of a major author or of two authors in comparison. Courses have included Shakespeare, Chaucer, Faulkner and Morrison. Repeatable. Prerequisite: CORE 110.

ENGL 307 Lit of Ethnicity, Gender & Race 3
Same as Engl 207, with reading and research assignments that broaden and deepen the student's engagement with the topic. Students may take Engl 307 more than once if different topics. Repeatable. Prerequisite: CORE 110.

ENGL 309 American Literature II 3
Development of American literature from the late 19th century to the present. Study of literature that explores American identities, including European-American, American Indian and African-American. Repeatable. Prerequisite: CORE 110.

ENGL 310 Introduction to Linguistics 3
Different ways of looking at how language functions as systems of sounds, word structures, grammatical patterns and meaning constructions. Insights useful for language learning, teaching and appreciation of English and language in general.

ENGL 312 Writing Workshop 1
Intensive one-week workshop in writing, usually conducted by a visiting author during Spring semester. Repeatable. Prerequisite: Any college-level creative writing course or permission of department chair. Course grade will be Credit/No Credit.

ENGL 315 The English Language 3
The study of the sound system, history, and varieties of the English language, followed by exploration of current developments in sociolinguistics, dictionaries, and word formation. The course cultivates an informed attitude toward English usage.

ENGL 319 English Grammar 1
A detailed study of the grammar of English. Designed especially for future teachers of ELL or high school English. Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in Engl 310 or foreign language competence through the 102 level.

ENGL 320 Methods of TESOL 4
Primary topics addressed are theories of language learning, general TESOL approaches, methods for the teaching of specific language skills, materials preparation and assessment issues in ELL. A concurrent internship (teaching English to a nonnative speaker) brings reality to the theories. Prerequisite: World language competence through 102-level or permission of instructor. Engl 310 is recommended but not required.

ENGL 325 TESOL Practicum 3 (2-3)
Supervised teaching in the U.S. or abroad when appropriate supervision can be arranged. Teacher Education students seeking a K-6 or 5-12 ELL certification who do their student teaching in ELL do not need to take this course. Those who don't do student teaching in ELL and those seeking K-12 certification will need to take this course for 2 credits (60 hours of teaching). Non-Teacher Education students should take the course for 3 credits (100 hours of teaching). Prerequisite: Engl 320 and consent of instructor.

ENGL 330 Writing Fiction 3
A workshop course in writing short fiction, with special attention to issues of setting, character, plot, dialogue and point of view. Readings by contemporary writers. Prerequisite: CORE 110, Engl 203 or consent of instructor.

ENGL 332 Writing Poetry 3
A workshop course in writing poetry in a variety of forms, with special attention to imagery, sound, line, meter and revision. Readings in classic and contemporary poetry. Prerequisite: CORE 110, Engl 203 or consent of instructor.

ENGL 334 Writing Creative Nonfiction 3
A workshop course in writing the personal essay and nonfiction prose, with special attention to creating a personal voice and applying creative writing techniques to nonfictional subjects. Students will read and discuss examples of creative nonfiction and prepare two longer essays for a final portfolio. Prerequisite: CORE 110, Engl 203 or consent of instructor.

ENGL 336 Special Topics in Writing 3
A workshop course in special writing topics by genre (such as Memoir). Prerequisite: CORE 110, Engl 203 or consent of instructor.

ENGL 408 English Writing Practicum 2
English Writing majors develop a final writing portfolio under supervision of faculty adviser. Recommended for fall semester of the senior year. Prerequisite: Engl 204, 280, three English writing courses, and permission of instructor. Course grade will be Credit/No Credit.

ENGL 409 English Practicum 2 (1-2)
English majors propose independent projects in research, off-campus field experience, or internship. Prerequisite: Engl 204, 300, three upper-level literature courses, and permission of instructor. Course grade will be Credit/No Credit.

ENGL 410 English Senior Seminar 2 (1-2)
Weekly meetings of English, TESOL, and English Writing majors and faculty for an exchange of views on such topics as vocations, curriculum and ethical/spiritual issues related to a life-long study of literature and language. Completion of a capstone e-portfolio, vocational interview, career services activities, and issues in the profession research required.