Acadenics

 

Chemistry

Amber Kaehr, Adjunct Professor of Chemistry
Doug Schirch, Department Chair, Professor of Chemistry
Dan Smith, Professor of Chemistry

Introduction

The Chemistry department offers a major in chemistry and also collaborates with the Biological Sciences department on the molecular biology/biochemistry major. In addition, a cooperative “3+2” program in chemical engineering is available, with three years completed at Goshen College and two years at a cooperating engineering school. See chemistry department faculty members for more information.

Visit the Chemistry department website at www.goshen.edu/chemistry.

Career and postgraduate opportunities

Chemistry graduates are currently working at many levels in business and industry. They also serve as medical doctors, professors and teachers, laboratory chemists, librarians and administrators.

Teacher education certification

Teacher certification is available for grades 5-12 in two areas related to chemistry. Courses needed in addition to chemistry major requirements are:
Chemistry - 30 credit hours of education courses.
Life Sciences and Chemistry - Biol 110, 120 & 130; Biol 200 or 201; Biol 203 or 303; Biol 300; Biol 301; and Biol 215, 309 or 315; and 30 credit hours of education courses. The first education class, Educ 201, should be taken in May term of the first year or spring of the sophomore year. For more details see education department catalog page and the Teacher Education Handbook.

Major in chemistry

51 credit hours

Student learning outcomes

Graduates in chemistry will:

  1. Possess broad knowledge of fundamental principles from organic, inorganic, analytical and physical chemistry and use this knowledge for solving problems.
  2. Demonstrate key laboratory skills for designing, executing, analyzing, recording and reporting laboratory experiments.
  3. Use effectively a broad range of modern scientific instruments.
  4. Demonstrate effective written and oral communication.
  5. Practice safe handling of chemicals.
  6. Use modern library tools to access chemical information.
  7. Successfully achieve career objectives for either employment or advanced education in graduate/professional programs.

Planning guide – options A & B

First year Goshen Core
General Chemistry
Calculus I
Goshen Core
General Chemistry
Calculus I
Second year Goshen Core
Organic Chemistry
Analytical Chemistry
Multivariate Calculus
SST (summer)

Goshen Core
Organic Chemistry
General Physics
Multivariate Calculus
SST (summer)

Third year Goshen Core
General Physics
Quantum Mechanics
Inorganic Chemistry
Goshen Core
Analytical Chemistry
Biochemistry (recommended)
Thermodynamics
SST (fall or summer)
Fourth year Balance of Goshen Core
Biochemistry (recommended)
Thermodynamics
Internship
Senior Seminar
Balance of Goshen Core
Quantum Mechanics
Inorganic Chemistry
Internship
Senior Seminar

Planning and advising notes

Fundamental computer competency is expected. Chem 409, Chemistry Internship or an equivalent noncredit experience is required. Two planning guides are given because some courses are offered only in alternate years. Additional recommended courses for chemistry majors: Chem 350, Chem 430, Biochemistry; Chem 450, Introductory Research Problems.

Chemistry courses


CHEM 101 Introductory Chemistry 3
Designed for non-chemistry majors. Chem 101 gives students a condensed foundation of chemistry principles. Students who have taken at least two semesters of high school chemistry with grades of B- or higher may enroll in Chem 103 without taking 101. Lectures and laboratory.

CHEM 103 Chemistry and Health 4
The study of organic and biochemistry, along with applications of biology, health care, and other fields, will be used to understand a public health problem such as malaria. The fundamentals of organic and biochemistry will be learned in the context of reducing infectious agents, protecting people from infection, detecting infections, and pharmaceutical treatments for diseases. A laboratory component will involve chemical experimentation, research skills, experimental design, and communication of results. Collaborative learning will be used in the laboratory. Prerequisite: two semesters of high school chemistry with grades of B- or higher or Chem 101.

CHEM 111 General Chemistry 4
An introduction to the basic particles of matter, the modern concept of the atom, chemical bonding and the structure of chemical compounds. The physical and chemical properties of some elements and compounds are examined. Reaction equilibrium and kinetics, acid-base theory, electrochemistry, radiochemistry and thermodynamics are included. Lectures and laboratory. Prerequisite: Chem 101,103 or high school chemistry (grade C or better) and adequate pre-calculus math.

CHEM 112 General Chemistry 4
An introduction to the basic particles of matter, the modern concept of the atom, chemical bonding and the structure of chemical compounds. The physical and chemical properties of some elements and compounds are examined. Reaction equilibrium and kinetics, acid-base theory, electrochemistry, radiochemistry and thermodynamics are included. Lectures and laboratory. Prerequisite: Chem 111.

CHEM 200 Analytical Chemistry 4
Quantitative analysis using traditional and instrumental methods. Lectures and laboratory. Prerequisite: General Chemistry, Chem 111-112 or consent of instructor.

CHEM 220 Human Nutrition 3
A study of the nutritive needs of the body in normal stages of growth and development, food sources of nutrients, nutrient functions and factors affecting nutrient utilization. Current U.S. and global nutritional problems are explored. Prerequisite: Chem 101, 103 or 111 or consent of instructor. (Biol 203 and 204 recommended).

CHEM 303 Introduction to Organic Chemistry 4
Covering structure, nomenclature, stereochemistry, and principal reactions for the major functional groups of organic chemistry, this is a one-semester survey course that gives an overview of the field. Laboratory exercises introduce basic purification techniques. This can be a stand-alone course for students majoring in biology and not continuing to medical school, veterinary school, or other graduate programs in biology and chemistry-related fields. For students with graduate school plans, this is the first in a two-course sequence in organic chemistry. Prerequisite: Chem 111-112.

CHEM 304 Intermediate Organic Chemistry 4
Using Chem 303 as a foundation, this course presents additional reactions (with an increased emphasis on mechanisms) and material on stereochemistry, as well as introducing spectroscopy (IR, NMR, GC-MS and UV-Vis). Together, the Chem 303-304 sequence covers all topics traditionally covered in two-semester organic chemistry courses. Laboratory experiments teach techniques for organic syntheses, instruments (GC/MS, FT-IR, FT-NMR), and chemical information retrieval. Prerequisite: Chem 303 with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 310 Thermodynamics 4
A study of classical thermodynamics in the formulation of Gibbs. Thermodynamic potentials, characteristic variables, stability, homogeneous and heterogeneous systems, chemical kinetics are treated. An introduction to statistical mechanics is presented. Applications include studies of material properties and engineering systems. Lectures and laboratories. Prerequisites: Phys 203-204, Chem 111-112, Math 211 and 213 or consent of the instructor.

CHEM 312 Quantum Mechanics 4
Principles of quantum mechanics are discussed beginning with a hydrogen atom and concluding with many atom molecules. The material is examined using the physical evidences that support the theory of quantum mechanics, particularly spectroscopy. The course also discusses symmetry of molecules, theory of NMR, and X-ray diffraction. Lectures and laboratory. Prerequisites: Phys 203-204, Chem 111-112, Math 211 and 213 or consent of the instructor.

CHEM 350 Environmental Chemistry 4
A laboratory intensive course with two lectures and two three-hour labs each week. Will include sampling, statistics and techniques involved in determining the level of contaminants in the environment. Although some instrumental theory will be discussed, the course will emphasize experimental technique. Students will gain hands-on experience collecting authentic environmental samples and using modern instrumentation and methods for detecting the presence of a variety of inorganic and organic compounds. Instruments used in the laboratory will include AA, HPLC, GC and GC-MS as well as standard commercial test kits. The students will gain experience using EPA methods for determining the level of contaminants in their samples. Prerequisite: Chem 111-112 and 303.

CHEM 400 Advanced Preparations 1 (1-2)
Projects involving advanced laboratory techniques.

CHEM 409 Chemistry Internship 3 (0-3)
Designed to give the student practical experience in chemistry. May involve work in a chemical industrial laboratory or production facility or an academic research activity. Students may also propose their own projects. 120 hours of work experience is required.

CHEM 410 Senior Seminar 3
(Cross-listed from Phys 410) An exploration of the relations between the natural sciences and other broad areas with special emphasis on ethical and theological concerns. Discussion, lectures, preparation and presentation of papers. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

CHEM 415 Inorganic Chemistry 4
Emphasis on models of structure and bonding as related to chemical and physical properties. Discussions will include descriptive chemistry of the elements, coordination and organometallic compounds and solid state materials. The laboratory component emphasizes synthesis and characterization of inorganic compounds. Prerequisites: Chem 200, 303, 304, and 312.

CHEM 430 Biochemistry 4
Introduction to the chemical processes of living organisms. This course (which complements Biol 307) focuses primarily on proteins (including enzymes) and metabolism, with introductions to carbohydrates, lipids, and cell membranes. Students planning to continue on to graduate programs in medicine, biochemistry, or related fields should take both Chem 430 and Biol 311 or 341 to get a solid background in the areas of biochemistry and molecular biology. Lectures and laboratory. Prerequisite: Chem 303-304.

CHEM 450 Introduction to Research Problems 1 (1-3)
Laboratory and conference. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.