Interview with Luke Bishop

Major

Communication

Current Position

Film Editor

GC Graduation Year

2007


Why or how did you choose your field? Were there specific experiences that influenced you?

I chose my field in high school. I was fortunate enough to attend a school that had an advanced video production facility where I was able to experiment with the technology. From my experience in high school, I was offered opportunities at GC that completely reaffirmed my decision. My first year at GC, I traveled to East Africa to help Professor Pat McFarlane shoot footage for two documentary films. By the end of my second year in college, I had credits in two finished documentaries, one the winner of a Gold Remi award at the Houston International Film Festival. GC furthered my experience by placing me in a service assignment with World Vision International in Cusco, Peru, where I traveled around southern Peru shooting footage for a project. Finally, my junior year I attended the Los Angeles Film Studies Center. While in LA, I worked for an Oscar nominated producer and learned about multi-million dollar productions.

What’s exciting about your job or field?

The most exciting aspect of my job is seeing a project from start to finish. The process of collaborating with other creative people to develop an idea and essentially giving it life is a very satisfying and exciting experience. It’s also exciting to see your work on TV or other public mediums.

What has been a challenge in your career journey?

The biggest challenge thus far is competition. In a world where anybody can buy Final Cut Pro and edit on their laptop, there is a lot of competition. The most difficult thing at first is demonstrating your talent and separating yourself from the rest.

Looking back, would you do anything differently?

I would have watched a lot more movies.

How did your liberal arts education assist you in your journey?

My liberal arts education has been essential to my success thus far. In an industry where versatility is rare, my experience in various areas has made me a more valuable asset to any film shoot or edit. Many of my colleagues attended specialty art academies or prestigious video colleges and specialized in one element of filmmaking. At GC, I completed every aspect of the process and that flexibility made it easier for me to find a position within the industry.

Did anyone offer you some memorable advice that you’d like to pass on? Or…what advice would you give to a young person just starting out?

One tidbit of advice I’d like to pass along is actually one of the GC core values. Passionate Learners. Even when you are no longer in school, continue to have a passion for learning within your field. Always look for new things to learn. Learn new technologies, techniques, equipment, anything; just keep learning. The more you know, the more valuable of an asset you are.