Course details

 

Business

Jon Geiser, Associate Professor of Business, Business Develop Director for CBEE
Jim Hess, BSBA Program Director & Associate Professor of Business
Michelle Horning, Department Chair, Professor of Accounting, Manager, Java Junction
Gretchen Lund, Adjunct Professor of Business
Phil Mason, Associate Professor of Business
Kent Palmer, Associate Professor of Informatics
Jerrell Richer, Professor of Economics
Russ Rupp, Professor of Accounting

Introduction

The Business department offers five majors and five minors:

Students may not earn a double major in two Business department programs, but major/minor combinations in the Business department are allowed.

The accounting, business, and marketing majors lead to a bachelor of arts degree. The business administration and organizational leadership majors lead to a bachelor of science degree and are designed for adult students in a year-round schedule of 5 and 7-week courses.

A Masters in Business Administration program is offered online. More information about the program can be found at www.thecollaborativemba.org and also in the Goshen College academic catalog for graduate programs.

The department also offers several non-credit continuing education programs in business through its Center for Business and Entrepreneurial Education. Visit the business department website at www.goshen.edu/business for more information.

Career and postgraduate opportunities

Business within a liberal arts context provides a strong foundation for succeeding in today's complex and multi-disciplinary business environment. As part of a Christ-centered college, the business department at Goshen College models a community of faith and learning by incorporating lessons of ethics and social responsibility in all aspects of the business education process. Students are encouraged to question, research, and explore the impact of every business decision on customers, investors, employees, and the environment.

Students with a degree from the business department are prepared for career opportunities in a broad range of businesses and nonprofit organizations. Many graduates pursue masters and doctoral degrees in all areas of business, accounting, information systems, economics, and law.

Accounting – Accounting graduates have career opportunities in auditing, banking, financial analysis, financial planning, taxation, as chief financial officers and controllers. Graduates with 150 credit hours are qualified to take the Uniform CPA Examination in order to qualify for licensure as a Certified Public Accountant.
Business and business administration – Business graduates are currently working in business, education, banking, overseas development, church offices and many not-for-profit organizations. Their careers span the fields of marketing, human resources, management, finance and operations. Many also work in consulting or have started their own businesses.
Economics – A global economics minor can complement any major course of study. Economics courses are designed to provide students with a deeper understanding of economic relationships and allows students to explore those relationships with a focus on international and environmental issues.
Entrepreneurship – An entrepreneurship minor can complement any major course of study. Entrepreneurship courses encourage students to be creative and innovative. Developing skills in entrepreneurship will enable students to identify opportunities and solve problems in a variety of work environments.
Marketing – A marketing major combines study in graphic design, marketing, business, and communication to prepare students for professional careers in marketing, such as marketing research, public relations, sales, advertising, and media relations.
Organizational leadership – This program enhances a student's professional skills while exploring hands-on applications relevant to workplace challenges. The curriculum includes accounting, communication, orgnizational culture, and ethics courses to provide students with the leadership and management skills needed by employers.

Computer science, Information technology, and Informatics

The Computing programs at Goshen College are led jointly by the business and mathematics departments. Information technology and informatics majors and minors require study in both computing and business. Detailed information about these programs can be found under Computing in this catalog.

Teacher education certification

Teacher certification in business is available for grades 5-12. Courses needed in addition to business major requirements are Bus 322 and Econ 306 or Bus 350. Also required are 30 credits of education courses, including a semester of student teaching. The first education class, Educ 201, should be taken in May term of the first year or fall of the sophomore year. See the education department pages and the Teacher Education Handbook for more details about requirements.

Minimum academic requirement for majors and minors

All Business department majors and minors must earn a grade of C- or higher in all courses required for their major and/or minor. Failure to attain this level of achievement requires the student to either repeat the course (for specific requirements) or take an additional course (an option for elective courses) and achieve a grade of C- or higher.

Major in accounting

52-61 credit hours

  • Acc 201, Principles of Financial Accounting 3
  • Acc 202, Principles of Managerial Accounting 3
  • Acc 210, Accounting Information Systems 3
  • Acc 301, Cost Accounting 3
  • Acc 302-303, Intermediate Accounting 6
  • Acc 304, Federal Income Tax: Individual 3
  • Acc 405, Auditing 3
  • Acc 434, Federal Income Tax: Corporate 3
  • Bus 220, Office Software Productivity 3
  • Bus 307, Career Planning 1
  • Bus 310, Business Law 3
  • One of the following internships: 3-12
    Acc 408, Accounting Internship
    Acc 409, Accounting Internship
    Bus 409, Business Internship
  • Bus 410, Business Capstone3
  • Econ 203, Principles of Microeconomics 3
  • Econ 204, Principles of Macroeconomics 3
  • Econ 380, Statistics in Research3
  • Mathematics requirement0-6

    For students entering Goshen College with SAT Math scores below 480 or ACT Math scores below 20:

    • Math 105, then either Math 115 or Math 141

    For students entering Goshen College with SAT Math scores of 480-540 or ACT Math scores of 20-23:

    • Math 115 or Math 141

    For students entering Goshen College with SAT Math scores above 540 or ACT Math scores above 23, requirement is met in one of the following ways:

    • Minimum AP Calculus score of 4 (AB level) or 3 (BC level)
    • Minimum IB score of 5 in Mathematics or Mathematical Studies
    • College credit in 100-level or higher mathematics course

Student learning outcomes

Graduates in accounting will:

  1. Identify and articulate how personal values and ethical considerations inform and impact business decisions.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the roles, goals, key concepts, methods, and tools utilized in specific business functions as well as the relationships between the various functions in a business.
  3. Intentionally prepare for an accounting career.
  4. Acquire skills needed to influence, inspire, and motivate individuals and groups to achieve results.
  5. Identify opportunities, analyze information, and apply frameworks for effective problem-solving and decision-making.
  6. Demonstrate effectiveness in writing and speaking in a variety of business contexts.
  7. Demonstrate ability to work productively with individuals in a diversity of roles and with varying interests in the outcome.

Planning guide

First year Goshen Core
Mathematics requirement
Principles of Financial Accounting
Principles of Microeconomics
Principles of Macroeconomics
Office Software Productivity
Second year Goshen Core
Principles of Managerial Accounting
Statistics in Research
Accounting Information Systems
Cost Accounting
SST (spring or summer, or summer after 3rd year)
Third year Goshen Core
Intermediate Accounting
Federal Income Tax: Individual
Business Law
Career Planning
Fourth year

Balance of Goshen Core
Balance of accounting major
Internship
Business Capstone

Planning and advising notes

SST should be completed in the first two years or summer of the third year. Additional math courses are encouraged for students anticipating graduate school.

In most states, 150 credit hours of undergraduate or graduate education is required before individuals can take the Uniform CPA Examination and/or be licensed as CPAs. Each state has unique licensing requirements, and students should work with their academic adviser to plan a course of study to meet the licensing requirements of a particular state.

Major in business

58 credit hours

  • Acc 201, Principles of Financial Accounting 3
  • Acc 202, Principles of Managerial Accounting 3
  • Bus 140, Essential Business Skills 3
  • Bus 220, Office Software Productivity 3
  • Bus 307, Career Planning 1
  • Bus 310, Business Law 3
  • Bus 315, Principles of Management 3
  • Bus 316, Principles of Marketing 3
  • Bus 317, Financial Management 3
  • Bus 318, Production/Operations Management 3
  • Bus 403, Management Strategy 3
  • Bus 409, Business Internship 3
  • Bus 410, Business Capstone 3
  • Econ 203, Principles of Microeconomics 3
  • Econ 204, Principles of Macroeconomics 3
  • Econ 380, Statistics in Research3
  • Additional business department courses, at least 6 credit hours upper level (courses numbered 300 and above) 9
  • Mathematics requirement0-6

    For students entering Goshen College with SAT Math scores below 480 or ACT Math scores below 20:

    • Math 105, then either Math 115 or Math 141
    For students entering Goshen College with SAT Math scores of 480-540 or ACT Math scores of 20-23:
    • Math 115 or Math 141
    For students entering Goshen College with SAT Math scores above 540 or ACT Math scores above 23, requirement is met in one of the following ways:

    • Minimum AP Calculus score of 4 (AB level) or 3 (BC level)
    • Minimum IB score of 5 in Mathematics or Mathematical Studies
    • College credit in 100-level or higher mathematics course

Student learning outcomes

Graduates in business will:

  1. Identify and articulate how personal values and ethical considerations inform and impact business decisions.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the roles, goals, key concepts, methods, and tools utilized in specific business functions as well as the relationships between the various functions in a business.
  3. Intentionally prepare for a business career.
  4. Acquire skills needed to influence, inspire, and motivate individuals and groups to achieve results.
  5. Identify opportunities, analyze information, and apply frameworks for effective problem-solving and decision-making.
  6. Demonstrate effectiveness in writing and speaking in a variety of business contexts.
  7. Demonstrate ability to work productively with individuals in a diversity of roles and with varying interests in the outcome.

Planning guide

First year Goshen Core
Essential Business Skills
Mathematics requirement
Principles of Financial Accounting
Principles of Microeconomics
Principles of Macroeconomics
Office Software Productivity
Second year Goshen Core
Principles of Managerial Accounting
Statistics in Research
SST (spring or summer, or summer after third year)
Third year

Goshen Core
Management, Marketing, Financial Management, Business Law
Production/Operations Management
Upper-level courses in major
Career Planning
A summer internship between third and fourth year is strongly encouraged

Fourth year Balance of Goshen Core
Balance of major
Management Strategy
Business Capstone

Planning and advising notes

SST should be completed in the first two years or the summer after the third year. Additional math courses are encouraged for students anticipating graduate school.

Major in business administration

NOTE: This is an adult accelerated B.S. program. See the Office of Graduate and Continuting Studies for more information.

Major courses: 54 credit hours

  • Acc 201, Principles of Financial Accounting3
  • Acc 202, Principles of Managerial Accounting3
  • Bus 121, Introduction to Entrepreneurship3
  • Bus 220, Office Software Productivity3
  • Bus 306, Essentials of Human Resource Management3
  • Bus 310, Business Law3
  • Bus 315, Principles of Management3
  • Bus 316, Principles of Marketing3
  • Bus 317, Financial Management3
  • Bus 318, Production/Operations Management3
  • Bus 403, Management Strategy3
  • Bus 410, Business Capstone3
  • Econ 203, Principles of Microeconomics3
  • Econ 204, Principles of Macroeconomics3
  • Econ 380, Statistics in Research3
  • Additional business department approved courses6
  • Math 141, Finite Mathematics3

Goshen Core courses: 42 credit hours (see Office of Graduate and Continuing Studies section of this catalog)

Student learning outcomes

Graduates in business administration will:

  1. Identify and articulate how personal values and ethical considerations inform and impact business decisions.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the roles, goals, key concepts, methods, and tools utilized in specific business functions as well as the relationships between the various functions in a business.
  3. Intentionally prepare for a business career.
  4. Acquire skills needed to influence, inspire, and motivate individuals and groups to achieve results.
  5. Identify opportunities, analyze information, and apply frameworks for effective problem-solving and decision-making.
  6. Demonstrate effectiveness in writing and speaking in a variety of business contexts.
  7. Demonstrate ability to work productively with individuals in a diversity of roles and with varying interests in the outcome.

Major in marketing

49 credit hours

  • Acc 201, Principles of Financial Accounting 3
  • Art 108, Digital Design3
  • Art 208, Typography3
  • Bus 307, Career Planning1
  • Bus 316, Principles of Marketing3
  • Bus 320, Marketing Research3
  • Bus 336, Advertising3
  • Bus 338, Sales3
  • Bus 409, Business Internship3
  • Bus 410, Business Capstone3
  • Comm 202, Oral Communication3
  • Comm 250, Writing for Media3
  • Comm 270, Media, Law and Ethics3
  • Comm 324, Principles of Public Relations3
  • Choose one of the following3
    Comm 240, Communication Research
    Econ 380, Statistics in Research
  • Choose two of the following6
    Acc 202, Principles of Managerial Accounting
    Art 308, Graphic Design
    Art 408, Advanced Graphic Design
    Comm 212, Digital Media Production
    Comm 326, Creating for the Web
    Engl 203, Introduction to Creative Writing
    Engl 204, Expository Writing

Student learning outcomes

Graduates in marketing will:

  1. Identify and articulate how personal values and ethical considerations inform and impact business decisions.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the roles, goals, key concepts, methods, and tools utilized in specific business functions as well as the relationships between the various functions in a business.
  3. Intentionally prepare for a marketing career.
  4. Acquire skills needed to influence, inspire, and motivate individuals and groups to achieve results.
  5. Identify opportunities, analyze information, and apply frameworks for effective problem-solving and decision-making.
  6. Demonstrate effectiveness in writing and speaking in a variety of business contexts.
  7. Demonstrate ability to work productively with individuals in a diversity of roles and with varying interests in the outcome.

Planning guide

First year Goshen Core
Digital Design
Oral Communication
Typography
Second year Goshen Core
Principles of Marketing
Media, Law & Ethics
Writing for Media
Statistics in Research or Comm Research
Sales
SST (spring or summer, or summer after third year)
Third year

Goshen Core
Principles of Public Relations
Advertising
Marketing Research
Principles of Financial Accounting
Career Planning
Upper level courses in major
A summer internship between third and fourth year is strongly encouraged

Fourth year Balance of Goshen Core
Balance of major
Business Capstone

Planning and advising notes

Principles of Marketing is a foundational course in this major and should be taken in the second year. This major allows students to choose from a list of course options, some of which require prerequisites, so appropriate course planning is required.

Major in organizational leadership

40 credit hours

NOTE: This is a bachelor's degree completion program. Entering students must have a minimum of three years of significant work experience and approximately 60 credit hours of college-level work already completed. See the Office of Graduate and Continuing Studies section for more information.

  • OLP 300, Effective Communication3
  • OLP 301, Individual and Group Dynamics3
  • OLP 307, Managerial Accounting3
  • OLP 308, Economic Environment of Organizations3
  • OLP 309, Leading and Serving in a Multicultural World3
  • OLP 312, Organizational Theory3
  • OLP 401, Organizational Cultures3
  • OLP 403, Leadership Theory and Development3
  • OLP 410, Ethical Issues in Leadership and Organization3
  • OLP 412, Leading and Managing Change3
  • OLP 420, Strategic Planning, Action, Measurement3
  • OLP 450, Leadership Project I1
  • OLP 451, Leadership Project II3
  • Religious World Goshen Core perspectives class3

Student learning outcomes

Graduates in organizational leadership will:

  1. Identify and articulate how personal values and ethical considerations inform and impact business decisions.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the roles, goals, key concepts, methods, and tools utilized in specific business functions as well as the relationships between the various functions in a business.
  3. Acquire skills needed to influence, inspire, and motivate individuals and groups to achieve results.
  4. Identify opportunities, analyze information, and apply frameworks for effective problem-solving and decision-making.
  5. Demonstrate effectiveness in writing and speaking in a variety of business contexts.
  6. Demonstrate ability to work productively with individuals in a diversity of roles and with varying interests in the outcome.

Minor in accounting

18 credit hours

  • Acc 201, Principles of Financial Accounting 3
  • Acc 202, Principles of Managerial Accounting 3
  • Acc 302, Intermediate Accounting 3
  • Econ 203, Principles of Microeconomics 3
  • Additional accounting courses 6

Note to business majors: Students must take 12 credit hours in accounting beyond what is required in the major, including Acc 302.
Note to marketing majors: Students must take 15 credit hours in accounting beyond what is required in their major, including Acc 302.

Minor in business

18 credit hours

  • Acc 201, Principles of Financial Accounting 3
  • Econ 203, Principles of Microeconomics 3
  • Additional business department courses, at least 9 credit hours upper level (300 and above)12

Note to accounting majors: Students must take 9 credit hours in business and economics beyond what is required in the major.
Note to marketing majors: Students must take 12 credit hours in accounting, business and economics beyond what is required in the major.

Minor in entrepreneurship

18 credit hours

  • Acc 201, Principles of Financial Accounting 3
  • Bus 121, Introduction to Entrepreneurship 3
  • Bus 328, Venture Planning 3
  • Bus 338, Sales 3
  • Two of the following: 6
    Acc 202, Principles of Managerial Accounting
    Bus 209, Field Experience
    Bus 316, Principles of Marketing
    Bus 360, Java Junction Management
    Bus 402, Applied Entrepreneurship

Student learning outcomes

Graduates in entrepreneurship will:

  1. Identify and articulate how personal values and ethical considerations inform and impact entrepreneurship.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the roles, goals, key concepts, methods, and tools utilized in entrepreneurial ventures.
  3. Acquire skills needed to influence, inspire, and motivate individuals and groups to achieve results.
  4. Identify opportunities, analyze information, and apply frameworks for effective problem-solving and decision-making.

Planning and advising notes

Note to accounting, business and marketing majors: Students must complete 12 credit hours of entrepreneurship minor courses beyond what is required in their major.

Minor in global economics

18 credit hours

  • Econ 203, Principles of Microeconomics 3
  • Econ 204, Principles of Macroeconomics 3
  • Econ 380, Statistics in Research3
  • Additional economics courses 9

Student learning outcomes

Gradutes in global economics will:

  1. Identify and articulate how personal values and ethical considerations inform and impact economics.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the roles, goals, key concepts, methods, and tools utilized in economics.
  3. Acquire skills needed to influence, inspire, and motivate individuals and groups to achieve results.
  4. Identify opportunities, analyze information, and apply frameworks for effective problem-solving and decision-making.

Planning and advising notes

Students should complete Econ 203, 204 and 380 in the first and second year. Additional mathematics courses are encouraged if graduate work in economics is anticipated. A teacher education program is available for students seeking to teach social studies in high school. See history department pages and the Teacher Education Handbook for more details.
Note to accounting and business majors: Students must take 12 credit hours selected from upper level economics courses, Bus 350, or business department May term international courses.
Note to marketing majors: Students must complete Econ 203, Econ 204, and 12 credit hours selected from upper level economics courses, Bus 350, or business department May term international courses.

Minor in marketing

19 credit hours

  • Art 108, Digital Design3
  • Bus 307, Career Planning1
  • Bus 316, Principles of Marketing3
  • Comm 202, Oral Communication3
  • Choose one course:3
    Comm 240, Communication Research
    Econ 380, Statistics in Research
  • Choose one course:3
    Bus 320, Marketing Research
    Bus 336, Advertising
    Bus 338, Sales
  • Choose one course:3
    Comm 324, Principles of Public Relations
    Comm 326, Creating for the Web
    Engl 203, Introduction to Creative Writing

Accounting courses


ACC 201 Principles of Financial Accounting 3
Development of principles underlying financial statements and accounting procedures. Basic accounting terminology and concepts of both financial and managerial accounting. Emphasis on analyzing and understanding financial statement information.

ACC 202 Principles of Managerial Accounting 3
Development of principles used in planning, controlling and evaluating organizational decision making. Primary topics are cost behavior, costing systems, profitability analysis and budgeting. At the conclusion of this course students will be able to conduct cost-volume-profit analysis, compute break-even points, prepare budgets, conduct variance analysis, do job costing, relevant cost analysis and capital budgeting. Prerequisite: Acc 201.

ACC 209 Field Experience 3 (1-3)
Work experience in, or student observation of, a business enterprise or problem. Each student's project is individually arranged with the instructor and must be approved prior to enrolling in this course. The course is designed to integrate and apply theoretical learning with experience. Students enrolling in this course must be an accounting major or minor and must have completed at least 15 hours of accounting program requirements. This course is repeatable.

ACC 210 Accounting Information Systems 3
Create an accounting system using a popular business software package. Gain understanding of internal control systems and organizational relationships with utilization of a computerized business system. Concentrates on the transaction cycles of cash receipts, cash disbursements, purchasing, sales, inventory control and management reporting. Prerequisite: Acc 201.

ACC 301 Cost Accounting 3
A study of how accounting information is used and communicated by managers to plan, control and evaluate decisions. Primary topics include cost behavior, cost-volume-profit analysis, costing systems, variance analysis, cost-allocation issues, budgeting, and pricing decisions. This course is a continuation of the principles learned in Acc 202. Case studies are used extensively in this course. Prerequisites: Acc 202, Bus 220.

ACC 302 Intermediate Accounting I 3
Development of accounting theory and practice by critically analyzing each element of the financial statement. Concentration on a conceptual approach to accounting information and reporting. Courses must be taken in sequence. Prerequisite: Acc 202.

ACC 303 Intermediate Accounting II 3
Development of accounting theory and practice by critically analyzing each element of the financial statement. Concentration on a conceptual approach to accounting information and reporting. Courses must be taken in sequence. Prerequisite: Acc 302.

ACC 304 Federal Income Tax:Individual 3
A comprehensive study of the current income tax laws as they apply to individuals and sole-proprietorships. Emphasis is placed on applying the tax laws for tax return preparation. Students are also introduced to tax research and tax planning.

ACC 375 Topics: 3 (1-4)
Depth study on a selected topic in accounting. Intended to accommodate student interest and/or faculty expertise in specific accounting issues. Issues may vary from year to year.

ACC 400 Selected Readings 1 (1-4)
Special topics for majors and minors.

ACC 405 Auditing 3
Study of the attest function and the responsibility of a Certified Public Accountant as an independent auditor of financial information. Prerequisite: Acc 303.

ACC 408 Accounting Internship 12 (6-12)
This internship is a full time position in a public accounting firm. Enrollment in this course is limited to accounting majors and must be approved by department faculty. Students are selected by accounting firms through a competitive interviewing process. Prerequisite: Bus 307.

ACC 409 Accounting Internship 3 (1-3)
Work experience in, or student observation of, a business enterprise or problem. Each student's project is individually arranged with the instructor and must be approved prior to enrolling in this course. The course is designed to integrate and apply theoretical learning with experience. Students desiring an internship in accounting must be an accounting major and must have completed at least 40 hours of major requirements. This course is repeatable. Prerequisite: Bus 307.

ACC 434 Federal Income Tax:Corporate 3
Study of the current tax laws applicable to C corporations, S corporations, partnerships and limited-liability companies. Students are introduced to tax research and tax planning for these business entities. Also included is an introduction to tax law related to not-for-profit organizations, trusts, estates and gift taxation. Prerequisite: Acc 304.

Business courses


BUS 121 Introduction to Entrepreneurship 3
The best way to learn about entrepreneurship is to do entrepreneurship. This course combines stories of success and failure in entrepreneurship, exploration of each student's aptitude for entrepreneurship, cultivation of new ideas, and practice with starting new ventures. Lean start-up, business model canvas, and customer development concepts are foundations for the experiential learning in this course.

BUS 140 Essential Business Skills 3
This course, designed for first year students, will introduce a variety of general business skills to benefit students in both their subsequent college courses and their future business career. Topics include business communication skills, personal productivity, working in teams, running effective meetings, problem-solving techniques, and decision-making.

BUS 209 Field Experience 3 (1-3)
Students enrolling in this course must be an accounting or business major or minor or an entrepreneurship minor and must have completed at least 12 hours of business or marketing or entrepreneurship program requirements.

BUS 217 Personal Finance 3
Designed to introduce students to the basics of personal finance. A survey course of personal and family financial planning with an emphasis on financial recordkeeping, planning your spending, tax planning, consumer credit, making buying decisions, purchasing insurance, selecting investments and retirement and estate planning.

BUS 220 Office Software Productivity 3
Advanced skills in commonly-used business software, such as spreadsheets, word processing, and presentation graphics. The focus is on using these tools to improve personal, team and organizational productivity and effectiveness. This course is offered in an on-line format and currently uses Microsoft Office 2013, Google Apps and Prezi. Students must have access to a personal computer.

BUS 306 Essentials of HR Management 3
Provides a comprehensive understanding of what effective firms in competitive environments are doing to manage their human resources as successfully as possible. Topics include the major issues facing human resource management and the various human resource activities.

BUS 307 Career Planning 1
The course will provide a framework within which to appraise career options, set goals and implement a plan to reach goals. Topics include self-appraisal, resumes, developing a job-search strategy, interviewing for jobs, choosing the first job and graduate-school opportunities. This course is available to students from all majors.

BUS 310 Business Law 3
Survey of legal principles. Topics include liability, contracts, sales and negotiable instruments; also, secured transactions, agency, partnerships, corporations and antitrust.

BUS 315 Principles of Management 3
Founded on the four major managerial functions: planning, organizing, leading and controlling. The process of management is applied to the functions of a business enterprise. Other topics include motivation, problem-solving and the coordination, communication and human relations aspects of management.

BUS 316 Principles of Marketing 3
The nature of marketing in our society; how organizations develop marketing strategies that enable them to meet their objectives and the needs of their customers through adequate marketing mixes; the relationship of marketing to other management functions; marketing activities at the domestic and international levels.

BUS 317 Financial Management 3
Introduces students to the primary elements of organizational finance such as time value of money, stock and bond valuation, forecasting, working capital management, capital budgeting and dividend policy. Prerequisite: Acc 202, Econ 203.

BUS 318 Production/Operations Management 3
Decision-making and quantitative analysis of production problems arising in areas of methods analysis, plant location, facilities design, production planning and control, inventory management, performance measurement, job design, worker safety and health, supply chain management, and quality control.

BUS 319 Leading Nonprofit Organizations 3
An exploration of how business principles apply to leading nonprofit organizations. Course provides students with the concepts, techniques and illustrations needed for effective nonprofit organizational management. Topics covered will include management and motivation of staff, trustees and volunteers, marketing, financial management, fund raising, planning, ethics, social responsibility, partnerships and sustainability.

BUS 320 Marketing Research 3
A comprehensive overview of the nature and scope of marketing research and its role in decision support systems. Course focuses on the practical aspects of marketing research and provides a framework for conducting quantitative and qualitative research. Prerequisites: Bus 316, Econ 380 or Comm 240.

BUS 322 Organizational Communication 3
(Cross-listed from Comm 322) An exploration of communication within organizations, as well as communication between organizations and the larger society. Topics include theories of communication and organizational structure; examination of power, culture, and conflict in organizations; and analysis of verbal and nonverbal messages in interpersonal, small-group and public settings. Assignments will assist students in developing skills in listening, analysis, speaking and writing. Prerequisite: Comm 240 or Bus 316.

BUS 328 Venture Planning 3
In this course students write business plans for an entrepreneurial venture. Areas of exploration include recognition of opportunity, pre-venture planning, start-up, strategy, negotiation and funding. Emphasis is also placed on the management of organizational growth and change. Attention is given to special concerns of small-firm management. Prerequisite: Bus 121 or consent of instructor.

BUS 332 Investments 3
In this course students will learn how to research, formulate and implement investment plans through portfolios constructed and monitored by students. Analytical frameworks and investment strategies that target objectives will be established and utilized. Also, decision making tools such as security valuation and leverage analysis models will be explored. Prerequisite: Acc 201.

BUS 336 Advertising 3
A managerial approach to developing advertising strategies; the use of advertising as a marketing tool; the creative process; evaluation of the effectiveness of advertising; the role of advertising in our society. Prerequisite: Bus 316.

BUS 338 Sales 3
An introduction to the dynamic world of selling. A pragmatic approach to the techniques and skills used by professional sales persons. Includes role playing and the development of a sales presentation.

BUS 350 International Business 3
International business is the field of study that focuses on business activities that cross national boundaries. It includes exports and imports - the subject of traditional international trade discussions - as well as foreign direct investment, international banking, the international transfer of technology and global business strategy. The cultural environment of international business is considered in some detail. The course presents the important activities of an international firm and a framework for analysis from a manager's perspective. Case studies are used in the course. Prerequisites: Econ 204 or consent of instructor.

BUS 360 Java Junction Management 3
Gives students the opportunity to manage a real business. Java Junction, a coffee shop located in the KMY Connector, is completely student-run and student-managed. Student managers, under the supervision of a business faculty member, have full responsibility for all management and operating decisions. The management team reports regularly to an Advisory Board who serves as Java Junction's Board of Directors. Managers are selected by the business department through an application process. Entrepreneurial students and those energized by challenges are encouraged to apply. This course is repeatable.

BUS 375 Topics: 3 (1-4)
Depth study on a selected topic in business. Intended to accommodate student interest and/or faculty expertise in specific business issues. Issues may vary from year to year and includes international trips during May term.

BUS 400 Selected Readings 1 (1-4)
Special topics for majors and minors.

BUS 402 Applied Entrepreneurship 1 (1-3)
This course is designed to provide an opportunity for experiential learning in entrepreneurship. Students must propose an activity to a business department faculty member for approval prior to enrolling in this course. Requirements for receiving academic credit may include a designated number of hours working on the activity, periodic meetings with the supervising faculty member, and written assignments related to the activity. This course is repeatable.

BUS 403 Management Strategy 3
A study and evaluation of management strategies to achieve organizational goals and objectives. Utilizes management principles, financial analysis and control, personnel decisions and marketing strategies to solve case/simulation problems. Prerequisites: Bus 220, 315, 316 and 317 or consent of instructor.

BUS 409 Internship in Business 3 (1-3)
Work experience in, or student observation of, a business enterprise or problem. Each student's project is individually arranged with the instructor and must be approved prior to enrolling in this course. The course is designed to integrate and apply theoretical learning with experience. Students desiring an internship in business must have a major in the business department and must have completed at least 40 hours of major requirements. This course is repeatable. Prerequisite: Bus 307.

BUS 410 Business Capstone 3
A broad examination of the responsibilities of business to society and social expectations of business. Topics include: business and its environment; corporate social responsibility; the manager and personal ethics; government regulation of business. Intended as the capstone senior seminar. Prerequisite: Senior standing in department or consent of instructor.

Economics courses


ECON 203 Principles of Microeconomics 3
A general survey of economic relationships and processes in modern society. Analyzes market and price behavior under competitive and monopolistic conditions and reviews the economic activities of government, with emphasis on spending and taxing patterns.

ECON 204 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
A general survey of economic relationships and processes in modern society. Focuses on macroeconomic topics: national-income accounting, aggregate-income determination, money and banking and international trade. Prerequisite: Econ 203.

ECON 209 Environmental Economics 3
In this course we consider how economic activity affects the environment and how environmental destruction can, in turn, harm the economy. We apply the concepts of externalities, public goods and open-access resources to topics such as air pollution, climate change and green business practices.

ECON 306 International Economics 3
Factors in international economic relations; international trade theory; balance of international payments; foreign exchange; commercial policy of the United States and other countries; foreign investment and economic development; international economic cooperation. Prerequisite: Econ 204 or consent of instructor.

ECON 308 Intro to Economic Development 3
Provides a general overview of the development field and surveys major issues from a range of viewpoints. Topics include trade and financial problems faced by developing countries, evaluation of various models of development and application of economic techniques to development problems.

ECON 309 Environmental Economics 3
In this course we consider how economic activity affects the environment and how environmental destruction can, in turn, harm the economy. We apply the concepts of externalities, public goods and open-access resources to topics such as air pollution, climate change and green business practices.

ECON 310 Economics of War and Peace 3
National defense spending is the largest category in the discretionary portion of the federal budget, larger than all the other categories combined. This course examines the benefits and costs of this commitment of public funds. Topics include the armament industry, national security, government financing, terrorism and peace-making.

ECON 312 Natural Resource Economics 3
In this course we examine how businesses utilize the earth's resources to provide goods and services. We assess whether natural resources are being used efficiently and sustainably, discussing policies and practices to correct market failures. Topics include fossil fuels, renewable energy and sustainable management of forests and fisheries. Prerequisite: Econ 203.

ECON 314 Ecological Economics 3
The emerging field of ecological economics balances the goal of economic efficiency against those of ecological sustainability and social justice. In this course we explore the "triple-bottom-line" (sustainable scale, just distribution and efficient allocation), applying these principles to business, government and individual decision-making. Prerequisite: Econ 203 or 309.

ECON 375 Topics 3 (1-4)
Depth study on a selected topic in economics. Intended to accommodate student interest and/or faculty expertise in specific business issues. Issues may vary from year to year and include international trips during May term.

ECON 380 Statistics in Research 3
(Cross-listed from Psyc 380) A study of data analysis and its relationship to research methods in a variety of settings. Collection, presentation and analysis of numerical data, including descriptive, parametric, and nonparametric statistics. Students are strongly encouraged to complete the Quantitative Literacy requirement in the Goshen Core before taking this course.

ECON 400 Selected Readings 1
Special topics for majors and minors.

Organizational leadership courses


OLP 300 Effective Communication 3
This course develops and enhances general and professional writing skills. Clear, concise, well-edited writing is emphasized. Course content includes selecting appropriate writing formats for specific situations and practicing various writing strategies to promote clear thinking and effective communication. Life-learning essays and professional writing assignments are included in the course requirements.

OLP 301 Individual and Group Dynamics 3
This course examines the question: What factors combine to determine individual and group performance in an organization? Individiual and group dynamics are examined in the context of the adult learning environment as well as the work environment. The internal and external environment of the worker in modern organizations is explored. Motivation is studies as a consideration of personality, attitudes, perception, roles, attitude, and environment.

OLP 307 Managerial Accounting 3
The acquisition, analysis and reporting of financial information is important to the individual leader and the organization. Special attention will be given to the planning and control responsibilities of practicing managers. Students gain confidence in their ability to interpret and use financial information for more effective decision making.

OLP 308 Economic Environmnt of Organization 3
The course focuses on the role of prices and markets in the modern, mixed free-enterprise economy. Students consider economic tools needed to better understand economic policy debates and make better choices as leaders.

OLP 309 Leading & Serving Multicultural Wld 3
The modern workforce is rapidly becoming a mosaic of colors, languages, cultural traditions and values. This demographic reality poses an immense challenge for both workforce and leaders. The goal of this course is to better understand different cultural values and styles, to recognize one's own biases and assumptions and to value diversity.

OLP 312 Organizational Theory 3
Humans are immersed in organizations; to a large extent they form our lives. This course introduces the history of organizational development and examines how and why organizations change. It covers organizational task goals of planning, organizing and control.

OLP 401 Organizational Cultures 3
This course introduces the concept that organizational culture is the sum total of the written and unwritten assumptions that an organization has learned and used throughout its history. The role of culture in young corporations, mid-life and mature organizations is considered. Consequences to organizational culture in a time of acquisitions, mergers and joint ventures are examined.

OLP 403 Leadership Theory & Development 3
This course focuses on providing theoretical foundations and conceptual principles for leadership and skills necessary to practice leadership competently. Activities are designed to enhance leadership self-awareness, encourage development of personal perspectives on leadership and prepare students to address leadership challenges. The course reviews historical and current perspectives on leadership and considers how leaders use influence to direct and coordinate the activities of group members.

OLP 410 Ethical Iss Leadershp&Organization 3
This capstone course considers the responsibilities of both leaders and organizations. Attention is given to three distinct but related themes: the social responsibility of an organization, public policy toward business organizations, and leadership ethics. Students are challenged to make ethical analysis a routine part of their decision-making framework. Case studies explore the reality of the multiple, competing claims placed on the leader and organization.

OLP 412 Leading & Managing Change 3
Organizations today function within a dynamic environment marked by rapidly changing technologies, globalization of markets, the "knowledge enterprise" and an increasingly diverse workforce. Learders of organizations must understand the change process, appropriate responses to change, conflict resolution and how to develop strategies for the future. Rethinking competition, leadership and markets is an essential exercise as leaders search for new paradigms that will govern organizartions now and in the future.

OLP 420 Strategic Planng,Action,Measurement 3
The course addresses strategic issues in running a business enterprise. The theme is good strategy-making and good strategy-execution are the key ingredients of company success and the most reliable signs of good leadership. The basic concepts and tools of strategic analysis and business research are presented, utilyzing case studies and simulation problems.

OLP 450 Leadership Project I 1
This capstone project integrates classroom theory with practical experience by identifying an opportunity to lead through service within an organizational setting ? either the student?s workplace or a public benefit organization. Students work with a faculty mentor to structure the learning, coordinate with the cooperating organization and assess the level and significance of their learning.

OLP 451 Leadership Project II 3
Continuation of the capstone project begun in OLP 450. Includes formal presentation of findings.

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