The world needs Goshen College

A chapel message from Jim Brenneman


On Nov. 18, 2005, the Church-Chapel was filled with more than 800 students, faculty, staff, alumni and community members awaiting the announcement by the Presidential Search Committee of the candidate of choice to serve as the 16th president of Goshen College. Rick Stiffney, chair of the search committee and vice-chair of the Goshen College Board of Directors, introduced educator, biblical theological and church leader Dr. James E. Brenneman to the community, culminating a discernment process that began following the resignation of Shirley H. Showalter in August 2005.

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Straight from the cow

By Jodi H. Beyeler

When senior Adrienne Landis went shopping for “raw milk” – that is, non-pasteurized or homogenized – in the Goshen area and wasn’t able to find it, she approached a vendor at the local farmer’s market. Leaning over his stall, he told her in a hushed voice where she could acquire the specialty product.

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Close to the heart:

“This I Believe” assignment yields personal stories, human truths

During the fall semester, Associate Professor of Communication Duane Stoltzfus ’81 heard about “This I Believe,” a series being aired on National Public Radio (NPR), from his wife, Karen Sherer Stoltzfus ’81. Then on the radio, he heard Deirdre Sullivan, a lawyer from New York, share her personal philosophy about funerals; she always goes, something learned from her father. “I was so moved by her stories and her thoughts,” said Stoltzfus: “‘Always go to the funeral’ means that I have to do the right thing when I really, really don’t feel like it. I have to remind myself of it when I could make some small gesture, but I don't really have to and I definitely don’t want to. I’m talking about those things that represent only inconvenience to me, but the world to the other guy.”

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Bulletin cover 2006 Winter issue
"The world needs Goshen College."

Winter 2006




Straight from the cow

By Jodi H. Beyeler

When senior Adrienne Landis went shopping for “raw milk” – that is, non-pasteurized or homogenized – in the Goshen area and wasn’t able to find it, she approached a vendor at the local farmer’s market. Leaning over his stall, he told her in a hushed voice where she could acquire the specialty product.

Why the secrecy? In Indiana, like many other states, it is illegal to sell raw milk.

That quiet tip led her to a picturesque Amish organic farm outside of Middlebury, Ind., about 15 miles from Goshen, where she would be able to come by the raw milk she desired – legally.

Karl Stutzman with cow Thus began, in 2004, a “cow share program” for Goshen College students, faculty, staff and recent alumni as several shareholders of a herd of cows, which provides the weekly supply of raw milk.

The way the program – more accurately called a “herd share program,” according to the farmer Jerry Miller – works is that someone interested in having raw milk to drink can pay $50 to own a share of a cow, and then pay a weekly boarding fee (for lodging and milking the cow) of $8 when they pick up their allotted two gallons of milk. So, Miller is never selling raw milk, but rather the shareholders are drinking milk from their own cows.

Miller owns six milk cows and sells 30 gallons of milk a week through his cow share program – with 10 of those gallons (or five shares) coming back to the GC campus. He sells the rest of the milk from his cows to a local cheese house.

Why all the hassle for milk? Landis, who grew up drinking regular skim milk in her home in Akron, Pa., first heard about raw milk from a friend. “When I first tried raw milk, I didn’t shake it up, so I drank straight cream,” she said. “I thought it was the most amazing thing ever. It was like ice cream, only not frozen and not as sweet.”

What makes raw milk different from what grocery stores have to offer is that it hasn’t been pasteurized or homogenized, and that it is almost always organic – coming from grass-fed cows that have not been given hormones or antibiotics. The pasteurization process was developed in the 1920s to kill bacteria in milk and to give it a longer shelf life. Homogenization is a process of breaking down the butterfat molecules in the milk through pressure.

Raw milk advocates claim that the pasteurization process, while eliminating the harmful bacteria, also kills beneficial bacteria that promote good health and eliminates the milk’s natural flavor. In addition, they believe that without undergoing the homogenization process, the natural butterfat is rich in fatty acids that protect against disease and stimulate the immune system. Those who have concerns about raw milk consumption, including the Food and Drug Administration, dispute the health claims and believe that pasteurization is necessary to rid the milk of potentially harmful pathogens.

Landis and her raw milk-drinking companions are not deterred in the slightest. Karl Stutzman ’03, the technical and public services assistant in the Good Library, picks up eight to 10 gallons of raw milk each week and brings it back to Goshen for others to pick up their share. He likes supporting a local farmer by purchasing directly so that the farmer receives the entire profit.

“The one thing I keep in mind is that pasteurized milk still has chemicals and other things in it that are not removed, because pasteurization only removes bacterial growth,” Stutzman said. “Jerry is careful with his milk and he is an individual I know and really trust. I think raw milk is safer than store-bought milk, because it is organic and because of the safety precautions – like straining and immediately chilling the milk – that he takes.”

Landis agreed, “I really love food and think it is important to buy local food for environmental, health and practical reasons.” She continues to find new uses for her raw milk as well beyond drinking; she has made cheese, whey, cream cheese, yogurt, butter and ice cream.

Associate Professor of History Jan Bender Shetler owns a half-share, and has received one gallon of milk each week since last summer. Her reasons for looking for an alternative are quite simple. “We used to drink raw milk in East Africa and the [milk from] the store tastes fake,” she said.

Landis keeps sharing the raw milk gospel and has even convinced her parents in Pennsylvania to make the switch. “What makes it so exciting is that it is local, raw, organic, grass fed cow milk. It is everything you could ever want in milk!” she said. “Once you start on raw milk, there is no going back.”

For more information about raw milk:
www.rawmilk.org
www.realmilk.org
www.cfsan.fda.gov


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