Hunger and conviction on the world political stage

By Thomas V.Bona

Like other scholars of his generation, Edgar Lin ’67 came to the United States in the 1960s and ’70s to study. When he returned home, he found that Taiwan was, as before, still in the grip of martial law and political dissents were not tolerated.
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Conceptualizing the unseen:

Artists Liz Nofziger and Greg Stahly share surprising perspectives

By Marshall V. King

Liz Nofziger ’96 found art early in her Goshen College career and is making a career out of what she continues to find.
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Finding one’s place in the story

By Jodi H. Beyeler

While Beth M. Miller, a history major from Danvers, Ill., was researching the influence of Moody Bible Institute and fundamentalism on Illinois Mennonites between 1920 and 1960 for her senior paper this semester, she uncovered a bit of information in the Mennonite Historical Library (MHL) that not only advanced her research but also suddenly connected her to the topic in a way she couldn’t have imagined.
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A Tale of Two Roommates:

When Mennonites talk of “foreign service” they usually don’t mean embassies. For these two economic officers, it all began in college.

By Wally Kroeker

It’s a long way from Smithville, Ohio, to Port-au-Prince, Haiti – in more ways than one. Growing up in Ohio, David Reimer ’84 never had to think about curfews or the possibility of being kidnapped.
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Parables for our times

By Rachel Lapp

The Parables traveling worship team was formed in 2004 to lead worship in churches, schools and wherever else Christians gather as college students creatively connect with audiences through music, Scripture, personal testimony and drama.
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Parables for our times

By Rachel Lapp

The Parables traveling worship team was formed in 2004 to lead worship in churches, schools and wherever else Christians gather as college students creatively connect with audiences through music, Scripture, personal testimony and drama.

 

Parables members this year are, from left to right, Mike Honderich, Jonn Meyer, Karen Graber, Cheryl Eunike, Jesse Landis-Eigsti, David Bontrager, Jessica David and Amanda Entz.

According to Associate Professor of Music Jim Heiks, the name of the group was chosen because “parables are stories Jesus told and each of the students in the Parables ensemble also have an individual story to share. Their lives have been diverse, and each one offers a unique perspective on how Christ is working in their lives.”

The group of eight students want to “use their talents” to share their faith experiences and engage audiences in group worship experiences, according to Parables member Jessica David, a junior music major from Archbold, Ohio.   

“I wanted to be in Parables because it combines all of my interests in a church setting,” she said.

During the 2005-06 academic year, the Parables team offered their program in 27 different settings – from a youth “snow camp” at Amigo Centre in Michigan to Madison (Wis.) Mennonite Church to Iowa Mennonite School to a pastor’s gathering on campus.

 "I had such a good time traveling with the group, meeting so many people at all the churches we visited and strengthening friendships within the group."
- Karen Graber,
  Hurley, S.D.

Sophomore Jonny Meyer of Millersburg, Ind., said Parables seeks to   engage audiences in worship “that is meaningful to them. We hope that everyone can find something to connect with in our program that helps   them grow in their relationship with God.”
 
“I joined Parables because I love meeting new people, and it’s been such a wonderful experience to travel around to new churches and notice the wide variety of worship styles used,” said Meyer. “I’ve gained an appreciation and respect for the numerous styles of worship that people are comfortable with. It’s amazing how many different ways people can experience God! Seeing the joy on peoples’ faces as we lead them in worship has really encouraged me this year.”

Worshipping with smaller congregations, David said, was particularly meaningful for her.  “It seemed as though the smaller the church, the more they appreciated our presence,” sahe said. “This helped me to remember that God is using our group to reach out to people in all different walks of life, and in ways that we cannot even imagine.”

Both Meyer and David said that another significant outcome of their participation in Parables is the bonding among the group as they travel and worship together. David said that the friendships she has made in Parables is among “the most valuable things I will take away from this year” at Goshen.


-- photos by Dustin Combs





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