A Gateway for the Future

by Luke Gascho

Planning is a gateway for the future. A gateway creates a transition between one space and another, links from one time to another and makes possible interactions among diverse people.
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A Pilgrimage of Peace:
Literature and Conflict Studies in the Republic and Northern Ireland


Associate Professor of Peace, Justice and Conflict Studies Joe Liechty, who spent two decades involved in reconciliation work in Northern Ireland, and Associate Professor of English Ann Hostetler, a published poet, led a group of students to Ireland and Northern Ireland for several weeks
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Shoulder tapping continues

By Bethany Nussbaum ’06, Jennifer Rupp ’06 and Jodi H. Beyeler

“Indeed, the special servant has two sources for his call, commission and authority; one is God direct and one is the church.
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A pioneering woman on the faculty:

Olive G. Wyse remembered


She was the first woman in the Mennonite Church to earn a doctorate and the first woman to have a campus building named in her honor, and her favorite foods included butter horn rolls and burnt sugar angel food cake.
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Goshen College students study civil rights era during May term on storied soil

By Jennifer Rupp ’06

In Memphis, Tenn., in front of the Lorraine Hotel where Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot, Molly Moyer experienced feelings that would not have been inspired by a textbook or even watching a documentary.
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Faculty and alumni featured in latest ‘Chicken Soup for the Soul’ book


When bookstore browsers see the newest title in the “Chicken Soup for the Soul® series – Stories for a Better World – they will find 101 stories of love, tolerance, forgiveness and peace by a former U.S. president, Nobel Peace Prize winners and six Goshen College alumni.
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Alumna shares story of 'crocodile-approved' sustainable development in a children's book set in West Africa

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Meeting ‘Malcolm, Martin and the Mennonites’ in May

By Jodi H. Beyeler

Standing in front of a classroom of Goshen College students, Malinda Berry moved deftly between defining theological words, such as “atonement” and “theodicy,” to showing video clips of Martin Luther King Jr. at a Civil Rights march to soliciting opinions regarding interracial dating.
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Fall 2005 cover


A gateway for the future

Fall 2005

 


A pioneering woman on the faculty:

Olive G. Wyse remembered


She was the first woman in the Mennonite Church to earn a doctorate and the first woman to have a campus building named in her honor, and her favorite foods included butter horn rolls and burnt sugar angel food cake. olive Olive G. Wyse, professor emeritus of home economics, died on Aug. 12 at the age of 99.

Wyse was remembered during Homecoming 2005 – a special event scheduled months earlier, planned as a celebration with her of the college’s former home economics program – by alumni, who shared memories and planted a tree on campus in remembrance of her life and her impact on the lives of others over 50 years of teaching at Goshen.

olive1 Wyse was born March 9, 1906, in Wayland, Iowa, to Amos and Luvina (Gerig) Wyse, and grew up on the family’s 80-acre farm. By age 18, she had completed high school plus two years of college and had met all state requirements to teach home economics, but employers were reluctant to hire her at such a young age. She studied home economics at Goshen College, graduating in 1926, and was then hired as an instructor for the Goshen Academy. Six years later, she entered the University of Iowa and completed a master of science degree in nutrition in 1933. She returned to Goshen to accept a full-time teaching post and received full professorship status in 1946, the same year she completed a doctor of education degree at Columbia University, recognizing that a doctorate would be of significance to the status of Goshen College faculty women.

olive2 Headquartered for years on the first floor of the former Arts Building on campus, the home economics program graduated 320 students during Wyse’s tenure on the faculty until her retirement in 1976. A gifted and memorable teacher, Wyse was instrumental in establishing a wide range of courses open to all students, regardless of major. She served on committees and was professionally active beyond campus, consulting with Associated Colleges of Central Kansas and contributing nutrition education and workshops for teachers in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic. She traveled to Europe, Australia, Japan, the Caribbean and several Canadian provinces.

Residing most recently at Greencroft, Wyse was a member of College Mennonite Church, where she helped teach the preschool Sunday school class for 30 years. In retirement, Wyse noted in 1993, she enjoyed activities she had been too busy to engage in during a busy life in academia, and was still concerning herself with issues of nutrition, delivering Meals-on-Wheels for 11 years.

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